Skip to main content

Full text of "Atlas of Brown Co., Ohio"

See other formats


GENEALOGY COLLECTION 




3 1833 00861 8420 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/atlasofbrowncoohOOIake 



1369419 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Title 1 

Table of Contents 3 

Table of Distances and Population 4 

Outline Plan of Brown County 7 

History 9, 12, 15, 18, 23, 26, 29, 32 



Map of the State of Ohio 

Outline and Railroad Map of the United States , 

Map of the Hemispheres 

Patrons' Directory 35, 38, 41, 44, 68, 72, "7, 80 



INDEX TO TOWNSHIPS. 



Byrd , „ 


49 




Clarke , 


53 




Eagle ; 


65 




Franklin 


7, 55 




Green , 


71 




Huntington , ., 


t ,„...,„ 30, 31 





Pleasant 36, 37 

Scott 6L 

Sterling 67 

Union , , 16, 17 

Washington 63 



INDEX TO TOWNS OR VILLAGES. 



Aberdeen m.^timini <.;; <.<.-. 30 I 

Arnlieim ....;..;.( 65 

Benton 71 

Brownsville . i 53 

Brownstown 65 

Carlisle ....i. Jt.i ut.n 57 

Decatur ... . 51 

Fayetteville....... .< .. 78 

Feesburg. r. 61 



Fincastle .-: , 65 

Georgetown , 42, 43 

Greenbush 36 

H-amersville 37 

Higginaport II 

Hestoria * , 27 

Levanna iff . i;i „„.,;« 63 

Locust Ridge ; . 67 

Bit Orab 71 



New Harmony 67 

New Hope 59 

Red Oak 47 

Ripley . 24, 25 

Rusaellville 37 

Sardinia 51 

Saint Marlins 7 

Taylorsville . 31 

White Oak Valley....j|. 6L 



INDEX TO PORTRAITS. 



Brady, John T 

Drake, G. W 

Ellsberry, W. W. ... 

Leeds, L. B 

Linn, Chas. A., Jr. . 



Lafabre, John 6 

Roney, Enoch E 5 

Tarbell, David 5 

Boyle Family 33 

Fulton, Wm 22 



Flaugher, E 13 

Flaugher, Mrs. E 13 

Grimes, W. H 45 

Grimes, Eliza Ann 45 



INDEX TO VIEWS. 



Boyd, C. W. Jt S. G 8 

Boyle, John ; 33 

Beasley, Jephthu C 39 

Buchanan, Thos 56 

Boles, David 58 

Buchanan, John 66 

Central Hotel, Higginsport GO 

Cooper, Jacob 69 

Cochran, John 69 

Conn, Robert 73 

Drugoo, Samuel 40 

Dillen, John 46 

Devore, Mrs. E. W 52 

Drake, B. P. 66 

Ellsberry, Dr. A. M 6 

Frebis, S 6 

Flaugher, Hon. E 13 

Fitch, E. M 14 

Fulton, Wm 22 




Fulton, Joseph 

Fulton, T. B 

Crimes, Eliza Ann 
Gillilund, Wm. L. . 
Gutln 

Helion & McChesuey 
Howard, Cyi 
Hall, Dr. J. M 
Harrison, C. E. 

Henry, Joseph 76 

Johnson, W. L 76 

Kinkead, Scott 50 

Kinkead, Guy H 50 

Kautz, Frederick R 58 

Kelly, A 62 

Kerr, Margaret 62 

Lyon, William 64 

Martin, Samuel, Jr 6 

Martin, A. B 28 



i Hotel. Georgelo' 
noo Company ..... 



Moore, Thomas M. 
Mannon. Robert.... 

Martin, Henry 

Mnnn, John 

Martin, William.... 
National Un 
Ohio Valley 
Pangburu, J. 

Pence, Henry. 

Reinert. I.ewis 

Spears. Spencer 

Scholtcr, Joseph 

Thomas. W. L 

Ursuline Convent 

West, William B 

WiDters' Livery, Feed, and Sale Stable.. 

Wiles, W. P 

Wiles, Jos 

Zaumseil, C 



TABLE OF DISTANCES 




POPULATION OF 

BROWN COUNTY, 

Oil I o, 

BY CENSUS OF 1870. 



Byrd 

Clark 

Eagle 

Franklin 

Green 

Huntington .... 
Aberdeen . 



1,251 

1,091 

1,166 

1,226 

1,490 

3,020 

871 

995 

Jefferson 1,207 

tewis 2.8" 

Higginsport 530 

Ferry 

Pike 

Pleasant 

Georgetown 1,037 

Scott 1,070 

Sterling 1,39* 

U„i on 5,399 

Eipley 2,323 

Washington 1,082 

Total ! 30,802 



. 3,016 
1,314 
. 2,605 



POPULATION 



CENSUS OF I860 AND 1870. 



I. I860. 



20,750 

Allen 23,623 

Ashland 21,933 

Ashtabula 32,517 

Athens 23,768 

Auglaize 20,041 

Belmont 39,714 

Brown 30,802 

Butler 39,912 

Carroll 14,491 



I'hsl 



24,188 
32,070 
34,268 
21,914 



paign .... 

Clark 

Clermont 

Clinton 

Columbiana 38,299 

Coshocton 23,600 

Crawford 25,556 

Cuyahoga 132,010 

Darke 32.278 

Defiance 15,719 

Delaware 25,175 

Erie 28,188 

Fairfield 31,138 

Fayette 17,170 

Franklin 63,019 

Fulton 17,789 

Gallia, 25,545 

Geanga 14,190 

Greene 28,038 

Guernsey 23,838 

Hamilton 260,370 

Hancock 23,847 

Hardin 18,714 

Harrison 18,682 

Henry ' 14,028 

Highland 29,133 

Hocking 17,925 

Holmes 18,177 

Huron..'. 28,532 

.Tackson 21,759 

Jefferson 29,188 

Knox 26,333 

Lake 15,935 

Lawrence 31,380 

Licking 35,756 



20.309 
18,185 
22,951 
31,814 
21,364 
17,187 
36,398 
29,958 
35,840 
15,738 
22,698 
25,300 
33,034 
21,461 
38,836 
25,032 
23,881 
78,033 
26,009 
11,886 
23,902 
24,474 
30,538 
15,935 
50,361 
14,043 
22,043 
15,817 
20,197 
24,474 
216,410 
22,886 
13,570 
19,110 
8,901 
27,773 
17,057 
20,589 
29,616 
17,941 
26,115 
27,735 
15,576 
23,249 
37,011 



Pop. 1S70. 

Logan 23,028 

Lorain 30,308 

Lucas 46,722 

Madison 15,633 

Mahoning 31,001 

Marion 16,184 

Medina 20,092 

Meigs 31,405 

Mercer. 17,254 

Miami 32.740 

Monroe 25,779 

. 64,006 

. 20,303 

. 18,583 



Montgomery... 

Morgan 

Morrow 

Muskingum 44,886 

Noble 19,949 

Ottawa 13,364 

Paulding 8,544 

Perry 18,453 

Pickaway 24,875 

Pike 15,447 

Portage 24,584 

Preble 21,809 

Putnam 17,081 

Richland 32,516 

Ross 37,097 

Sandusky 25,503 

Scioto 29,302 

Seneca 30,827 

Shelby 20,748 

Stark 52,508 

Summit 34,674 

Trumbull 38,659 

Tuscarawas 33,840 

Union 18,730 

■Van Wert 15,823 

Vinton 15,027 

Warren 26,689 

Washington 40,609 

Wayne 35,116 

Williams 20,991 



Wo 



1,550 



Wyandot 18,553 

Total 



Pop. 1SC0 

20,996 
29,744 
25,831 
13,015 
25,894 
15,490 
22,517 
26,534 
14,104 
29,959 
25,741 
52,230 
22,119 
20,44: 
44,416 
20,751 
7,010 
4,945 
19,678 
23,469 
13,643 
24,208 
21,820 
12,808 
31,158 
35,071 
21,429 
24,297 
30,868 
17,493 
42,978 
27,344 
30,656 
32,463 
16,507 
10,238 
13,631 
26,902 
36,268 
32,483 
16,633 



APPROXIMATE POPULATION 

UNITED STATES. 

CEHSUS OF 1860 and 1870. 





1870. 


1SC0. 


Alabama 


. 996,9.92 


904,290 


Arkansas 


. 483,157 


435,427 


Jalifornia 


. 560,233 


380,010 


Connecticut 


. 537,454 


400,151 


Delaware 


. 125,015 


112,218 


Florida 


. 187,752 


140,439 


Georgia 


.1,195,338 


1,057,329 


Illinois 


.2,538,408 


1,711,753 


Indiana 


.1,673,943 


1,350,941 


Iowa 


.1,191,727 


674,948 


Kansas 


. 364.405 


107,110 


Kentucky 


.1,321,011 


1,155,713 


Louisiana 


. 726,927 


709,290 


Maine 


. 626,451 


628,276 


Maryland 


780,806 


687,034 


Massachusetts .. 


.1 457,351 


1,231,065 


Michigan 


.1,187,135 


749.112 


Minnesota 


. 433,564 


172,022 


Mississippi 


. 834,934 


791,396 


Missouri 


.1,719,978 


1,182,317 


Nebraska 


. 119,696 


28,836 


Nevada 


. 42,191 


6,857 


New Hampshire 


.. 318,300 


326,072 


New Jersey 


. 906,108 


672,031 


New York 


..4,374,703 


3,880,735 


North Carolina.. 


.1,071,135 


992,607 


Ohio 


.2,603,392 


2,339,511 


Oregon 


.. 90,933 


62,464 


Pennsylvania.... 


..3.519.G01 


2,906,370 


Khodc Island.... 


.. 217.356 


174,621 


South Carolina. 


.. 710,979 


703.812 


Tennessee 


..1,257,495 


1,109,847 


Texas 


.. 805,000 


602,432 


Vermopt 

Virginia 


.. 330,552 


315,110 


..1,224,962 


1,590,079 


West Virginia .. 


.. 442,033 




Wisconsin 


..1,055,165 


775,873 


Total States.... 


38,092,482 31,184,170 



TERRITOKIF.S, ETC. 

Arizona 9,058 

Colorado 39,804 

Dakota 14,181 

Dist. of Columbia. 131,706 

Idaho 14,998 

Montana 20,594 

New Mexico 91,864 

Utah., 86,786 

Washington 23,925 

Wyoming 9,118 



2,003,392 2,339,511 



34,197 
4,839 
75,076 



93,541 
40,295 
11,576 



Total Territories.. 442,694 259,626 
Total States 38,092,482 31,184,170 



Total TJ. States 38,535,176.31,443,702 



9 



HISTORY OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO. 



The claims of the different European raonarchs to large portions 
of the Western Continent were based upon the Erst discoveries 
made by their subjects. The territory now comprised within the 
limits of Ohio was formerly a part of that vast region claimed by 
France, and known under the name of Louisiana. In the year 
1748, a company of Frenchmen, calling themselves the "Ohio 
Company," established a few fur trading posts along the Maumee, 
although the title to the land of the State was yet unsettled be- 
tween them and the English. In 1749, the English built a trad- 
ing house on the Great Miami, at a place called Lorin's Store. 
Christopher Giot, an agent of this company appointed to examine 
Western lands, also made a visit to this river during the same 
year, and called on the Twigtrees tribes. 

The French, hearing of the English settlers among these tribes, 
in 1752 sent a force to rout them, in which transaction the first 
white blood was shed in Ohio. The tribes of the Shawnees and 
Delawares being hostile, Col. Boquet, in 1764, marched from 
Fort Pitt, Pennsylvania, into the heart of the State, and by pru- 
dence and skill effected an honorable treaty with the savages. 
The next war With the Indians, in 1774, is commonly called Lord 
Dunmore's war. A severe battle was fougbt at Wapatomico, 
above Zanesville, on the Muskingum, and one at Point Pleasant, 
on the Ohio, which ended the war. In 1779, an expedition was 
planned against the native Shawnees, and their village, Cliilti- 
cothe, on the Little Miami, near the site of Xenia, burned. The 
" Coshocton Campaign" was an unimportant demonstration on 
the Muskingum, in 1780. There were several other invasions of 
unimportance about this time. In 1786 that of Col. Logan, Ed- 
wards in 1787, and Todd in 1789. 

Moravian missionaries were in Ohio as early as 1762. Ninety- 
four of the Moravian Indians were murdered within the limits of 
Tuscarawas County, in 1782, by a party of Americans under Col. 
Williamson. By an Act of Parliament, in 1774, all this territory, 
known as the " Northwestern Territory," was made a part of the 
province of Quebec. In 1783, the claims of England to the 
Northwestern Territory were assigned to the United States. The 
Erst purchase of land and settlement in Ohio of a permanent 
character was in 1788, at Marietta.. Previous to this there had 
been an attempt for settlement at the mouth of the Scioto, by four 
families from Pennsylvania; but difficulties with the Indians de- 
feated their enterprise. The same year that Marietta was settled, 
Congress appointed Gen. St. Clair governor of the territory. 
The second settlement in the State was at the mouth of Little 
Miami, Eve miles above Cincinnati. A third settlement was made 
on the celebrated French grant, at Gallipolis, early in 1792. The 
Cincinnati reservation along the Cuyahoga, the Connecticut re- 
servation along the Cuyahoga, were partially settled in the year 
1800 by about one thousand inhabitants. General Harmer's un- 
successful expedition against the Indians, undertaken from Fort 
Washington, now in the limits of Cincinnati, occurred in the year 
1790. This was followed by St. Clair's still more disastrous 
defeat in 1791. Gen. Wayne, in 1794, wiped out these disgrace- 
ful defeats, by a successful attack upon the Indians at the Rapids 
of the Maumee. This victory was speedily followed by the peace 
honorable to the whites. July the 27th, 1788, Washington 
County was formed; this being the first county organized within 
the limits of Ohio. Hamilton was the second county established 
in the Northwest Territory, organized January 2d, 1790, by pro- 
clamation of Gov. St. Clair. Wayne County was established 
Aug. 25, 1796, being the third county organized in the territory. 
In 1797 Adams County was organized by proclamation of Gov. 
St. Clair, and covered a large tract of country, including that of 
which Clermont and Brown are now composed. December 9th, 
1800, Clermont County was organized, which with Adams em- 
braced all the territory now within the limits of Brown, except 
a small portion in the northeast corner, taken from Highland 
County. 

The first meeting of the territorial legislature was on the 24th 
of September, 1799. Number of acts passed, thirty-seven. The 
convention to form a constitution assembled in Chillicothe Nov. 
1st, 1802. Under this constitution the first general assembly 
met Match 1st, 1803. 

ORGANIZATION OF BROWN COUNTY. 

Brown County was organized in the year 1817, and contains 
496 square miles, or 317,440 acres of land. It is bounded on the 
north by Clinton, on the east by Highland and Adams, on the 
south by the Ohio River, and on the west by Clermont County. 
The principal streams flowing into the Ohio River are Eagle, Red, 
White Oak, and Stra'ight Creeks. The soil, being formed upon 
alternating strata of clay and limestone, partakes chiefly of those 
two earths. Prior to the organization of Brown County, in 1817, 
the territory now embraced in it formed parts of Adams and 
Clermont, including a small portion of Highland. 

According to the old constitution of the Stale of Ohio, coun- 
ties should include not less than 400 square miles of territory. 
Adams and Clermont Counties, having mure territory than desira- 



able, petitioned the general assembly to strike off a part from each, 
and form a new county. John Pollock, from Clermont, and Abram 
Shepherd, from Adams, were members of the senate at the time, 
and through them the division was effected. Chapman, from Cler- 
mont, and Middleton, of Adams, were at the time members of the 
house of representatives, the last-named gentlemen being strongly 
in favor of the division. 

In the spring of 1817, Richard Cross, then county-surveyor of 
Adams County, and James Pilson — now of Brown — surveyed the 
line dividing Adams and Brown Counties, beginning at a point 
eight miles due west of the town of West Union, the county seat 
of Adams County, and from that point south to the Ohio River, 
and north from that point to the Highland County line. James 
Pilson and George Light, then county-surveyors of Clermont, sur- 
veyed the line dividing Clermont and Brown Counties, beginning 
at a point on the Ohio River two miles above the mouth of Bull- 
skin Creek, thence north to the Clinton County line. The county 
was named Brown, in honor of Gen, Jacob Brown, an officer of 
the war of 1812. The first court of Brown County was held in 
Ripley, in the month of April, 1818, by Joshua Collett, presiding 
judge, and James Moore, William Anderson, and James Camp- 
bell, associate judges. Abraham Shepherd was at the same time 
appointed clerk of the court for the term of seven years. George 
W- King was appointed prosecuting attorney for the same length 
of time. William White and John Lindsay were the first com- 
missioners of the county, appointed April 15, 1818. William 
Humphries was at the same time appointed treasurer to serve until 
the first of June. William Butt was the first sheriff, he being 
chosen at a special election held during the following May, The 
following persons composed the Erst grand jury: Jeptha Beasley, 
George Bingem, John T. Parker, William Purdam, Samuel Pick- 
erel, James Ross, James Henry, Duncan Evans, Edward Shala- 
day, Valentine McDaniel, Lyons Pangburn, Douglas Shaladay, 
Henry Newkirk, Isaac Ellis, James Monroe, met at the July term 
of court, 1818. 

At an election held October 1st, 1818, John Evans, James 
Wells, and Walter Wall were elected commissioners of the 
county; they constituting the first regularly elected board of the 
county. They then cast lots for the respective terras of office, 
Evans continuing for one year, Wells two, and Wall three years. 
The county now being organized, the courts established, it became 
necessary that the county seat should be located permanently at 
some point. On this question the people of the county, as well 
as the commissioners, were divided in opinion, some favoring one 
point and some another. The commissioners failing to locate the 
same agreeable to the minds of the people, the legislature appointed 
a special .board of commissioners for this purpose, consisting of 
William McFarland, Philip Good, and Isaac Cook of Ross County, 
who were instructed to select a site, and locate the county seal of 
Brown County. In the year 1819, the above-named commission- 
ers purchased of John Thompson and James Poage fifty acres of 
land on Straight Creek (land now owned by Charles Abbot) und 
proceeded to lay out a town for the seat of justice of Brown 
County, Bridgewater being the name applied to it. Upon the 
site of this prospective town was built a double log court house, 
in which two terms of court were held during the year 1819, when 
it was then ascertained that the tille of the property was imperfect 
on the part of Thompson — consequently the enterprise wus aban- 
doned, and the county seat located at Ripley during the bitter 
part of the year 1819. The commissioners after giving the notice 
required proceeded to sell (Jan. 7th, 1820), to the lowest bidder, 
the contract for building a court-house in the town of Ripley. 
George Poage became the purchaser for the sum of two thousand 
nine hundred and ninety-nine dollars; the sale being conducted 
by Ebenezer Sutherland. In order to lessen the expense of the 
county in building a court-house, the several citizens of Ripley 
subscribed a large amount of money for this purpose. When the 
new building was but partially completed, a difficulty again 
occurred between the contending parties in regard to the location 
of the county seat, when the legislature again appointed a board 
of commissioners to locate the same, who proceeded to locate it 
permanently at Georgetown, during the year 1S20, the citizens of 
that place paying into the county treasury the amount of money 
previously subscribed for the building of a court-house by the citi- 
zens of Ripley. After the removal of the county seat to George- 
town, a temporary building was erected in which the courts were 
held for some time. In the absence of a jail, a room for this pur- 
pose was furnished by Samuel Stitt. August 1st, 1823, the com- 
missioners contracted for the building of a court-house in the 
village of Georgetown; the contractors being T. L. Hamer, 
Thomas L. Hauck, William White, Michael Weaver, William' 
Butt, and David Johnson. The commissioners were William 
Clark, Walter Wall, and Robert Brackenridge. The sum agreed 
upon wilh said contractors for the building was $3999.99, said sum 
to be paid out of the proceeds of certain lands donated to Brown 
County by James Woods, Abel Reese, aud Henry Newkirk, and 
laid off in lots at Georgetown; the amount to be paid them out 
of the balance remaining over and above the purchase money — 



money due the aforesaid doners — and provided the proceeds afore- 
said, after paying the purchase money, should not amount to three 
thousand nine hundred and nine-nine dollars and ninely-nine cents, 
the contractors were to have no other lien upon the county of 
Brown by virtue of said contract. The sale of said building was 
conducted by William Butt, the same being built according to 
agreement and received by the commissioners August 2, 1824. 

June the 7th, 1825, by virtue of a decision of the Supreme 
Court of Ohio, the commissioners of Brown County settled the 
amount of George Poage for building a court-house iu the town 
of Ripley, and allowed him for the same; the sum of three 
thousand three hundred aud fifty dollars, Willi interest thereon 
from the first day of August, 1821, at the rate of six per cent, 
per annum, amounting in all to four thousand one hundred and 
twenty dollars and fifty cents, done agreeably to an Act entitled 
" An Act for the relief of George Poage, passed February 6lh, 
1824." Whereupon the said George Poage fiied in the commis- 
sioners' office a relinquishment in the following words; "I, George 
Poage, of the county of Brown, and State of Ohio, do hereby 
release to the commissioners of said county of Brown, for the 
use of said county, all my right to any sum or sums of money, or 
other property or thing heretofore subscribed by any persyu or 
persons to the commissioners of said county, for the purpose of 
building a court-house in the town of Ripley, in the county of 
Brown. 

"I do this in compliance to and in the true intent and meaning 
of an Act for the relief of George Poage, by the legislature of 
Ohio, passed February 6th, 1824." Agreeably to an Act of 
the legislature, authorizing the commissioners of Brown County 
to dispose of the public property in the town of Ripley to the 
highest bidder, the same was offered August 20th, 1825, the 
commissioners reserving a bid for the use of the county. The 
highest bid made being considered too small a price for the 
property, the same was not stricken off, aud consequently re- 
mained unsold for want of a bid to justify the sale ; the same 
being afterwards disposed of at public sale for a small sum of 
money, the building being removed for other purposes. 

April 18th, 1827, the building of auditor's and clerk's offices 
were contracted for by the commissioners, with John Walker, 
for $390, Thos. L. Hamer and Jesse R. Grant as sureties for 
his performance of the same. Said buildings were completed 
and received by the commissioners on the 4th of December 
following. 

January 14th, 1828, the commissioners met at their office in 
Georgetown, aud, pursuant to a notice published in the Western 
Argus, sold the " old clerk's office" to James Baker, for the sum 
of three dollars and fifty cents, he being the highest ladder. At 
the same time the old jail was received from the contractors. 

January 16th, 1829, the commissioners purchased of Michael 
Weaver a farm for the use of the county, for which they paid 
$522; Edward Thompson, Job Egbert, and Noah Ellis being 
appointed directors of said farm. 

March the 7th, 1849, the commissioners, being of the opinion 
that the court-house was insufficient to hold court in, rented the 
basement of the Methodist Church, for which they agreed to pay 
$100 per year. At the same time they also employed Hubbard 
Baker to dra.v a draft of the proposed new court-house, the con- 
struction of which was sold on the 22d of May, 1849. John 
Clever, being the lowest bidder, purchased the stone work at 
three dollars and sixty cents per perch. Basil Waters, being the 
lowest bidder, purchased the brick work at seven dollars per 
thousand ; aud Emmet Baker the carpenter work, at seven 
thousand dollars ; Robert Moore the digging of the cellar, at 
fourteen cents per square yard. The said building was com- 
pleted and received by the commissioners during tlve year 1851. 

EARLY SETTLERS. 

The 6rst settlemeut within the present limits of Brown County, 
of which any definite account can now be obtained, was made by 
Belshazzar Dragoo, who settled on Eagle Creek, about three miles 
from Ripley, on the land where Elijah Fitch now lives, in 1794. 
Dragoo was a native of Hagerstown, Maryland. He bad a family 
consisting of twelve children, only one (Benjamin) of whom is now 
living, he being the youngest of the family. Belshazzer Dragoo 
was a soldier of the "Revolution." He is supposed to have built 
the first house (a log cabin) that was built in the county. There 
being abundance of wild game, they never were at any time with- 
out meat — for bread, the corn was ground in a hand-mill. This 
family were compelled to endure severe privations, and often 
escaped the dreaded tomahawk and scaiping-knife of the merciless 
Indians. 

The next cabin built in the county was built by William Kiu- 
kead. William Kiukead, Sr., was born iu Augusta County, Va., 
January 9th, 1736. He was (November 3rd, 1756) married to 
Eleanor Guy; she being taken captive by. the Indians, April 
14th, 17G3, who took her to their town (Chillicothe) and retained 
her until 1765, when she made her escape and retarued to Vir- 



# 



12 



HISTORY OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO — Continued. 



lember 25th, 1 7 
born April I9lli, 17G2. 
by tbe Indians. 



ginia. The nines of their children were Margaret born Sep- 
B ,nl . s - .... ,, 37 . All( | relv , born February 25lh, 1760 ; Isabel, 
Margaret and Andrew, Sr., were captured 
„.,drew, Jr., was born July 25th, 1704, in 
Warren Comity, Ohio, while his mother was a captive. Agnes 
was born 1766 ; William, June 6lh, 1769 ; Eleanor, Augnst 31»t, 
1771; Margaret, September 10th. 1772; Susannah April 3d, 
1775; Guy, March Ulh, 1779; Kebecca, July 25th, 1782; John, 
December 25th, 1784. . 

In the year 1780 William Kinkend, Jr., in company with others, 
brought a drove of sheep to Woodford County, Kentucky, he 
being at that time eleven years of age. In the fall or the same 
year he returned to Virginia, and in the spring of the following 
year returned to Woodford County, with his father's tally, ami 
made a settlement in that county near the present town of Ver- 
sailles. December 1st, 1789, William Kinkend, Jr., was married 
to Annie Dunlnp. In the year 1790 he took a lease on btoner 
Creek Bourbon County, Kentucky, for a term of seven years. 
After remaining here five years he sold his lease, uad, becoming 
dissatisfied Willi Kentucky on account of slavery, he removed to 
Ohio, and settled in Brown County, in 1796, where he bought 
three hundred acres of land in Harris' survey, paying $4.00 per 
aire for the same. William Kinkeud, Jr., hnd a rnmily of nine 
children, viz ; Alexander, Nancy, 1'cggy, William, Annie, Robert, 
Jumes, Guy, and Seott, n part of whom are still residents of the 
county The next settler in the county wns n man named York, 
who kept n ferry at the month of Red Onk Creek. York did not 
own any land. Where lie was from and what became of him is 
not now known. Win. Dunlnp, a young man 18 years or age, came 
with Wm. Kinkend when he removed from Kentucky, in 1796. 
After remaining with him two years he married Mary Shepherd, 
and settled one mile north of Wm. Kinkend. Among the early 
settlers in this part of the county was Jeptlra Beasley, who came 
rrom Virginia, in 1798, and settled on the land now owned by 
his son, Jeptlm Bensley, Jr. Mr. Beasley was engaged in trading 
.down the river, and, it is snid, that he walked home from New 
Orleans no less than 18 times. Isaac Shepherd located here in 
1798 or '9, on the land now owned by Wm. Oillilnnd, 

The early settlers hi the vicinity* of Aberdeen were, Benjamin 
Beasley. from Ky., in 1796; Evan Campbell, James Parker, Wil- 
liam Gilberts, Urinli White, John Evans, John Cruse, George 
Harrison, Ellis Palmer, Nathan Ellis. Among the first settlers 
in the vicinity of Georgetown were, Daniel Figging (a soldier of 
the Revolution), Thomns Allen, Henry Rnlston. William White 
In the eastern part of the county the Washburns were early 
settlers, and also noted Indian hunters. Prom the year 1800 the 
tide of emigration flowed in rapidly — too rapidly to etironicte the 
several names of the settlers. Pioneer history is one full of 
romantic and instructive incidents, illustrative of early scenes and 
habits. The habitations of those days were the double log-cabin 
with an entry between, wilh two rooms, clapboard roof, puncheon 
floors, with chimneys of split sticks and clay mortar, clapboard 
doors, with wooden hinges and latches. A loom and spinning 
wheel were indispensable, as well ns a hominy block and pestle, 
and a hand-mill to manufacture meal and flour. The sehool- 
honses were rude structures of logs witiiout windows, the light 
being admitted through cracks between the logs, which were in 
winter closed witli oiled paper. Geographies, dictionaries, and 
grammars were unknown ; tencliers were very limited in their edu- 
cation, so tliat it wus impossible to obtain an education in any- 
thing but the most common branches. In those days there was 
a mugic in an education, which few now seem to realize. An 
education under our liberal school system seems to have lost its 
charms. 

For a long time the early settlers on this side of the river were 
compelled to go to Kentucky for their supplies. Food, clothing, 
household goods, farming implements, and munitions of war 
could be obtained only in small supplies, and with great difficulty. 
Intercourse witli the older settlements was slow and iincertuin, 
and they could not be relied upon for protection, or even for 
assistance, in times of dnnger from the Indinns. In 1806, an 
eclipse of the sun took place, and it was the impression with many 
that the end of the world had come, and many prayed on that day 
who had never prayed before, and who hud seldom thought very 
devoutly of the coining of tlinl great and notable day or the Lord. 
As there were but Tew books, and little educntion, but few were 
enabled to understand the coming of such sudden darkness at 
midday. 

EARLY RELIGIOUS HISTORY. 

The first religious services held within the limits of Brown County 
were dnring the summer of 1798, by the Presbyterians, in a grove on 
" Red Oak" Creek, near the Ripley and Rnsselville turnpike, about 
two miles from the town of Ripley. The minister having charge of 
the meeting wns Robert Wilson, from Washington, Ky. During 
the next year, 1 799, n church organization was effected in this neigh- 
borhood, and a log church was built on the land of Isaac Shepherd, 
about three hundred yards rrom the site of the presentchurch at Red 
Oak. Unfortunately, the records of this organization were never 
preserved, and there is no means of determining who constituted 
this first church, more than that the Redmans, Drngoos, McClurgs, 
and Shepherds constituted a part of the organization. Robert 
Wilson preached for the newly organized church during the re- 
mainder of the year 1799. The congregation then procured the 
services of John Denlevey, from Va., who preached for them 
almost two years, when a dissatisfaction arose from his preaching 



•' Wse doctrine," which caused Denlevey to leave the church, taking 
with him a part or the society, who with himself joined the 
Shakes. During the two succeeding years the church was will, 
out nny regular pastor. In 1805, tbe services of James Gilbland, 
from Pendleton district, Soutli Carolina, were secured. Mr. 

(,' ,d continued to labor for the congregation for a number of 

years. The "round log" church was repluced after a few years 
with a "hewed log" building, the same being replaced by a stone 
building in 1817. ■..,»!, 

The next religious organization in the county was that ot tne 
Shakers who hnd nn orgnnization in the southeastern part of the 
county, beginning about the year 1804. John Denlevey, who had 
previously been a minister in the Presbyterian Church, was a promi- 
nent member of this orgnnization. Their first meetings were held 
in groves, or at private houses. A log building divided into two 
departments wns afterward erected, in which the two sexes wor- 
shipped separately. The existence or the Shakers ns a religious 
body was or short duration, beginning "about the year 1 804, and 
ending about 1810." 

About l his time, organizations or the different churches were 
becoming common in the several neighborhoods throughout the 
county. ""In September of 1810, a Christian camp meeting was 
held near where Bentonville now stands." About the year 1812, 
the first Methodist church of the county was organized. 

The following slntistics show the number of denominations and 
value of church property in the county at the present time:— 

Total number or organizations of all denominations, 80. Of 
these eight nre Baptist, twenty-four Christian, two Lutheran, 
twenty-seven Methodist, twelve Presbyterian, two German Re- 
formed, nnd five Roman Catholic. Total number of edifices, 79. 
Estimated value of church property, $279,850. 

MINERALS. 

The blue limestone is the principal mineral found in Brown 
County. It is valuable for building stone or for burning into 
lime. In the upper portion or it are found marine shells, and on 
the hillsides it is found in detached pieces. Underneath the 
lowest strata or base of the hills is a compact soapstone or blue 
clay, impervious to water. There are throughout the county 
nniuerous mounds or tumuli of the ancient inhabitants, and many 
interesting relics of the Stone Age have been found. 

SOIL. 

As the Ohio River borders on the county for a considerable 
distance, there are many tine bottoms, which are mostly rich and 
well cultivated. Beyond these for an average distance of three 
miles, the river hills rise from 400 to 500 feet, and are inter- 
rupted at short distances by precipitous ravines. The timber 
and soil are of a good quality, and where the hills are not too 
steep to be furmed, good crops of corn and tobacco are produced. 
Further back from the river the rnvin'es disappear, and a high 
tuble-lnnd is reached, more clayey, yet well adapted to grass and 
small grains, and with proper cultivation suited to any crop com- 
mon to the climate. 

MANUFACTURES. 

The following statistics show the manufacturing industry ot 
Brown County in 1870 : — 

































u ^ 






i 


B 




Agricultural implements 


5 


30 


$23,300 


811,550 


8,660 


38,440 


Carriages and wagons 


9 


18 


5,800 


4,650 


5,438 


14,360 


Clothing, men's 


6 


14 


8,000 


3,150 


4,043 


11,228 


Coop? rage 


6 


41 


10,011(1 


14,150 


23,400 


46,5110 


Flouring mill products 


4 


13 


33,500 


2,117 


511,446 


66,781 


Furuiture 


2 


13 


16,500 


3,000 


5,140 


16,528 


Iron castings 


1 


10 


15,000 


3,480 


4,560 


10,240 


Leather, tanned 


3 


11 


17,400 


5,000 


311,165 


46.580 


Leather, curried 


2 


10 


6,300 


5,000 


46,775 


54.1100 


Ltqaors, malt 


4 


8 


22,100 


1,100 


0.81X1 


11,600 


Lumber, planed 


1 


32 


35,000 


24,«no 


16,000 


55,000 


Lumber, sawed 


14 


80 


5MTO 


24,812 


57.217 


10,430 


Marble work monuments 


3 


9 


3,900 


3,680 


4,325 


10,395 


Musical instruments — pianos... 


1 


10 


26,100 


8,000 


7,300 


18.1100 


Saddlery aud harness 


11 


42 


7,750 


4,650 


:W,77l> 


54,012 


Wood, turned and carved 


3 


19 


1,850 


2,865 


10,160 


15,000 


Woollen goods 


3 


29 


11,800 


6,800 


25,112 


37,135 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

The following is a list of the officers of Brown County since its 
organization : — 



JODQES- 

Joshua Collett. 
Joseph N. Campbell. 
James Moore. 
William Anderson. 
John Thompson. 
James Finlcy. 
Robert Breckenridge. 
G. P. Torrence. 
David Johnson. 
Hugh B. Payne. 



SHERIFFS. 
William Butt. 
Robert Allen. 
James Louden. 
Jeremiah Purdum. 
John H. Blair. 
John J. Higgins. 
William Shields. 
Thomas Middleton. 
W. P. Allen. 
Henry Young. 



1818-1824. 
1824-1826. 
1826-1832. 
1832-1835. 
1835-1838. 
1838-1843. 
1843-1847. 
1S47-1849. 
1849-1853. 
1853-1655. 



JUDGES. 
John W. Price. 
Benjamin Evans. 
Henry Martin. 
Micha Woods. 
O. T. Fishback. 
George Collings. 
Isaac Carey. 
Benjamin Sells. 
Shepherd Norris. 
T. Q. Ashburn. 
David Tarbell. 



John S. Foster. 
Charles Ousler. 
A. Jacobs. 
W. C. Howard. 
George R. Shields. 
John Dillen. 
John T. Brady. 



1855-1857. 
1857-1861. 
1861-1865. 
1865-1867. 



18 



Ahram Shepherd, 
William Shepherd, 
James Fiuley, 
Q. W. King, 
John H. Blair, 
Gideon Dunham, 



1818-1823. 
1823-1830. 
1830-1832. 
1832-1842. 
1842-1848. 
1848-1850. 



H. McKibben, 
R. H. Higgins, 
R. O. Mitchell, 
R. H. Higgins, 
John P. Biehn, 



TREASURERS. 



Willis 



i Humphries, 



1821- 1822. 

1822- 1832. 
1832-1838. 
1838-1846. 
1846-1848 



William Middleton 
Thomns Middleton, 
John D. White, 
Jesse Dupnn, resigned, 1848-18-10 
John D. While (app.), 1849-1854, 
R. J. Bennett, 1854-185" 



John McColgin, 
John B. Louiso, 
Alfred Louden, 
William Norris, 
A. J. Parker, 
Peter L. Wilson, 
G. W. Drake, 



-1871. 



1856-1859. 
1859-1864. 
1864-1868. 
1868-1876. 
1876- 



1857-1861. 
1861-1863. 
1863-1865. 
1865-1869. 
1809-1874. 
1874-1875. 
1875- 



John J. Higgins, 1852-1855. 
John W. King (resig'd), 

1855 to July, 1857. 
J. H. King (app.), Dec. 1857. 
D. W. C. Louden ires'd), 

1857-1858. 

J. H. Marshall, 1858-1850 
James P. Fylfo (res'd), 1849-1861. 



PROBATE JUDGES. 

Charles Campbell 



1861- 1862. 

1862- 1864. 
Charles Campbell, from 

April to August, 1864 (died). 
G. W. King, Irom Sept. 



William Middleton, 
William Butt, 
Benjamin Evans, 
.Samuel Glaze, 
H. Lindsey, 
James J. Smith, 
S. T. Bronson, 
John McColgin, 



G. W. King, 
Alexander Gillilaud, 
Thomas H. Lynch, 
David Devore, 
Andrew Ellison, 
C. F. Campbell, 
William Boyle, 
C. W. Blair, 
C. A. White, 



1818-1825. 
1825-1829. 
1829-1831. 
1831-1834. 
] 834-1841 
1841-1845. 
1845-1 849. 
1849-1853. 



to Dei 
David Tarbell, 
S. H. Stevenson, 



Lewis Egbert, 
J. W. Purdum, 
J. W. Heterick, 
W. W. Ellsberry, 
J. A. Stevenson, 
A. G. Quinlnn, 
W. W. Ellsberry, 
E. E. Rooey, 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS. 
1818-1825. J. G. Marshall, 
18.25- W. H. Slv, 
1836-1838. W. F. Wvlie, 
1838-1840. Thomas F. Taylor 
1840-1813. E. C. Devore, 
1843-1845. J. W. Bailey, 
1845-1849. W. J. Thompson, 
1849-1852. C. A. Linn, Jr., 
1852-1854. 1 



COMMISSIONERS. 



J ohn Evans, 
James Wells, 
Walter Wall, 
W. C. Clark, 
Robert Breckenridge, 
John Evans, 
William Humphries, 
J ohn Lindsey, 
William Liggett, 
Robert Allen, 
Henry Chapman, 
J nines MeCall, 
Joseph Stableton, 
William Pnrker, 
John Lindsey, 
Joseph McCurty, 
Noah Ellis, 
Jeptha Beasley, 
Samuel Ross, 
John Lindsey, 
Richard Ditto, 
Michael Pindell, 
Joseph Dngan, 
William Norris, 
W. P. Allen, 
John S. Beasley, 



1818-1822. 
1818-1821. 
1818-1824. 

1821- 1823. 

1822- 1824. 

1823- 1826. 

1824- 1830. 

1824- 1825. 

1825- 1830. 

1826- 1829. 

1829- 1835. 

1830- 1833. 
1830-1833, 
1833-1835. 
1833-1835. 
1835-1836. 

1835- 1844. 

1836- 1837. 

1837- 1839. 
1836-1837. 
1839-1845. 
1842-1844. 
1844-1845. 

1844- 1850. 

1845- 1846. 

1846- 3 ms. 



Robert McLain, 
J. F. Thompson, 
Peter L. Wilson, 
C. W. Reed, 
John Wright, 
Slimy Moore, 
Josiah Briant, 
W. F. Pickerill, 
Thomas Hunter, 
John Brady. 
Daniel K eethler, 
S. M. Blair, 
W. B. Logan, 
James Campbell, 
J. F. Davis, 
Huston Bare. 
Samuel McNown, 
C. A. Linn, 
James Campbell, 
William Fulton, 
William Vance, 
Peter L. Wilson, 
John Wright, 
Joseph L. Bergen, 
W. B. WeBt, 



1864. 
1864-1870. 
1870- 



1853-1855. 
1857-1861. 
1861-1863. 
1863-1865. 
1865-1867. 
1867-1872. 
1872-1875. 
1875- 



1854-: 
1856- 
1858-1 
1860-1 
1863- 
1867-1 
1871- 
1875- 



1846-1853. 
1846-1848. 

1848- 1849. 

1849- 1851. 

1850- 1854. 

1851- 1856. 

1853- 1856. 

1854- 1856. 
1856-1857. 

1856- 1861. 

1857- 1858. 

1857- 1861. 

1858- 1861. 
1868-1870. 
1863-1866. 

1865- 1868. 

1866- 1869. 

1867- 1670. 

1868- 1870. 

1869- 1874. 

1870- 1873. 
1870-1873. 
1873-1876. 
1873-1876. 
1874- 



EXTENT AND VALUATION. 

Brown County contains an area of four hundred and seventy- 
eight square miles, three hundred and five thousand foiirdunidred 
end ninety-two acres or land, valued at six million nine hundred 
and fifty-eight thousand four hundred and nine dollars. Value of 
real estate in cities, towns, and villages, nine hundred and seveuly- 
three thousand and twenty-five dollars. Value of chattel pro- 
perty, three million three hundred and eighty-one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-eight dollars, making a total value of eleven 
million three hundred and thirteen thousand three hundred and 
ninety-two dollars. 



HISTORY OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO — Continued. 



15 



* HISTORY OF THE PRESS OF BROWN COUNTY. 

(Thanks are due Dr. T. W. Gordon for the following extracts 
relative to the history of the press of Brown County up to the 
year 1856.) 

The first printing establishment brought to this county was 
purchased by Louden, Bnit & Co.^ of Morgan, Lodge & Co., in 
Cincinnati, and a newspaper was published on it, entitled The 
Benefactor, in June, 1820, itl the village of Levana, two miles 
below Ripley, on the Ohio River. It continued one year at that 
place, when a dissolution took place between its owners, and Mr. 
Louden sold his interest to William Middleton, of Ripley. At 
that time a man, who was a silent partner, is said to have entered 
the office and to have taken possession of, and carried away a large 
portion of the material, including the main screw of the press and 
the platten. These he hid amongst the " dog fennel" and 
"Jamestown weeds, fl then growing abundantly in and about 
Levana. No paper was issued from June, 1821, until November 
the same year, when the owners tried to collect the material thus 
scattered by a writ of replevin, but failed in their efforts. They, 
however, gathered up what they could find of the material left, 
and added new material to it, and again The Benefactor made 
its appearance, conducted by Butt and Middleton ; but with the 
partial change of owners it made a complete change in location, 
and instead of greeting its patrons from the banks of the'Ohio, as 
of yore, its radiating centre was Georgetown. Butt and Middleton 
continued its publication at Georgetown up to the 16th of May, 
1822, when Middleton sold his interest to Hon. Thomas Morris, 
of Bethel, in Clermont County, and The Benefactor made its ap- 
pearance under the management of Butt & Morris until in Janu- 
ary, 1824, when Hon. Thomas L. Hamer became (he editor, and 
James J. Smith publisher. The paper was published by these 
gentlemen until 1825, when its publication was discontinued. 
The size of The Benefactor was 18 by 22 inches. Subscription 
price $2 per annum. 

The second paper published in the connty was The Political 
Censor. This paper was first established at Williamsburg, at that 
time the county seat of Clermont County, by Thomas S. Foot and 
Robert Tweed. The first number was issued in March, 1812. It 
strenuously opposed the last war with Great Britain, that being 
the bone of contention with the then contending parties in the 
United States. Foot and Tweed continued its publication until 
some time in 1814, when they sold the establishment to James 
Finley, who continued to publish the paper at Williamsburg one 
year, when he removed to West Union, Adams County, and con- 
tinued its publication until March, 1822, when he removed to 
Ripley. In 1823 the establishment was purchased by John and 
James Carnahan, who published the paper until some time in 1824, 
when it was discontinued. Size of the paper was 17 by 22 inches. 
Terms, SI. 50 per annum in advance. 

The third paper published in the county was The Castigator, 
the first number of which was issued at Ripley, on the 11th day 
of June, 1824, by David Amiuen. In politics The Castiyator at 
first rather favored the election of John Q. Adams to the presi- 
dency, but after another paper was started in the county, which 
came out fully for Mr. Adams, The Castigator ceased to support 
or even favor his election, and at a later period became an active 
partisan in favor of the election of Gen. Jackson to the office of 
president, and on that gentleman's wiihdrawal from the contest, 
it hoisted the name of Martin Van Bnren, and fought manfully 
for his election. In August, 1826, The Castigator was removed 
to Georgetown. In May, 1836, Mr. Ammen sold the paper to 
Benj. Morris, of Clermont County, who, on the 10th day of the 
following July, resold it to Mr. Ammen, losing nearly one-half of 
the price of the establishment in the speculation. David Ammen 
then took his son Michael Ammen in company, and they continued 
to publish the paper until the 27th of March, 1837, when it was 
purchased by a purse raised for the occasion. Its politics were 
changed to " Whig," and John Duffy and Thomas H. Lynch 
commenced its publication, and continued it until the 21st of the 
following Jnne, when the name was changed to the Political Ex- 
aminer. The material on which The Castigator was printed after- 
ward printed The Examiner, The Ripley Telegraph, and still later 
Freedom's Casket, by W. Tomiinson, who removed the material 
to Piketon, Pike County, Ohio, and published The Hickory Sprout 
upon it. After issuing eleven numbers of The Sprout, commenc- 
ing July 24th, 1844, the material was burned. 

The fourth paper published in this county was the Western 
Philanthropist, by Daniel F. Barney, of Georgetown. The first 
number was issued on the first day of December, 1825, the paper 
only continuing for a few weeks. 

The fifth paper published in Brown Connty was the Western 
JByis, by A. and J. Butt. The first number was issued on the 
13th of June, 1827. Its publication was continued until some 
time in the year 1828, when the office and material were burned ; 
new material was then purchased, and the paper again started, 
when, in December, 1828, the owner removed it to Waverly, Pike 
Connty, Ohio. 

The sixth paper published in the county was the Farmer's 
Chronicle and Ripley Advertiser, The Grst number was issued 
on the 25th of August, 1830, edited by G. W. King, and pub- 
lished by Patterson. Mr. King had purchased the material for 
the office with the hope of assisting Mr. Patterson to obtain a 
livelihood for himself and family, but, finding that Mr. P.'s pro- 
pensity for alcoholic drinks was almost insatiable, he disposed of 
the press, type, etc., after keeping op the paper for nearly a 
year. 



The seventh paper published in Brown County was 77ie Demo- 
crat and People's Advocate, published in Georgetown by Isitac 
N. M orris, the first number of which made its appearance on the 
12th day of November, 1833. It strongly advocated the election 
of Martin Van Buren to the office of President. lis publication 
was only continued for sis mouths, when the proprietor sold the 
material to C. F. Campbell, of Ripley. 

The eighth paper in the county was The Ohio Whig, C. F. 
Campbell, editor, the first number being issued at Ripley, August 
4th, 1834. The Whig was continued until some time in 1836, 
when Mr. Campbell sold the establishment to Robert B. Harlan, 
of Wilmington, Clinton County, Ohio. 

The next paper was The Political Examiner, the first number 
of which was issued by John Duffec and Thomas H. Lynch, on 
the 21st of June, 1837. After the publication of a few numbers 
the paper was issued by Duffee and Pollock until after the returns 
of the election of 1838, when the publication of the Examiner 
was discontinued. At that time Preston Sellers owned a share in 
the press, and he, taking charge of the paper, published it until 
the next August, when Lynch sold the material to C. Edwards, of 
Ripley. Mr. Sellers then procured new material, and continued 
to publish the Examiner until August, 1843, when he sold out to 
Isaac N. Walters, who removed the press and fixtures to Clark 
County, Ohio. Sellers then purchased the material upon which 
The Free Press had been printed at Xenia, Ohio, and removed it 
to Georgetown, where he continued to publish The Examiner 
until March, 1845, when it was removed to Ripley, and there 
published until August, when it was transferred by the sheriff to 
G. W. and Oscar F. Shaw, who commenced the publication of 
The Ripley Bee upon the material. 

The tenth paper published in Brown County was Tlie Demo- 
cratic Standard, the first number being issued July the 4th, 1837, 
at Georgetown, by Amos Dei-rough, who continued the publication 
of the same until Jan. 9th, 183$, when he sold the establishment 
to L. B. Leeds & Francis M. Allen, who published it until the 
12th day of October of the same year, after which time it was pub- 
lished by Leeds alone until January, 183-D, when Mr. Derrough 
again took charge of it, and published the same until January, 
1840. The Standard was again revived on the first of August, 
1840, by D. P. Palmer, who published it until February, 1845, 
when Will. Tomiinson became the proprietor, and published it 
until 1847, when it was published by J. H. Smith and C. W. 
Blair. In 1848 it was published by J. H. Smith and T. Q. Blair. 
In 1849 I). W. C. Johnson became proprietor, and the name of 
the paper was changed from Democratic to Georgetown Standard. 
After publishing the paper but a short time, Mr. Johnson resold 
it to Will Tomiinson, who published it until the year 1850, when 
the Standard and the Democrat and Journal were united under 
the name of the Democrat and Journal. 

The eleventh paper was The Ohio Freeman, established in 
Georgetown by John Duffy, Mal'ch 8lh, 1839. After the publi- 
cation of the thirteenth number it was discontinued. (The Free- 
man was neutral in politics.) 

The twelfth paper was the Ripley Telegraph, by C. E. Edwards; 
the first number of which was issued at Ripley on the 7lh of 
Sept. 1839. Mr. Edwards continued to publish it until Jan. 8th, 
1842, when he sold to Morrison H. Burns, who published it until 
May, 1843, when he sold it to Will Tomiinson, who published 
Freedom's Casket on the same material. 

The fourteenth paper published in the county was the Ripley 
Bee, by George W. & Oscar F. Shaw. The first number of the 
Bee was issued on the 23d day of August, 1845. The paper was 
continued under this linn until May 1st, 1848, when L* G. Jenkins, 
purchased G. W. Shaw's interest in tho paper, which was then 
conducted by the firm of Shaw & Jenkins, until May, 1849, when 
Oscar F. Shaw sold his interest to C. F. Campbell. Jenkins & 
Campbell enlarged the paper, and contiuued its publication until 
the 19th of August, 1850, when Jenkins sold his interest to C. F. 
Campbell and T. F. Sniffin. 

The fifteenth paper was the Western Wreath, edited by C. W. 
Blair, G. B. White, and J. G. Marshall, and published by Will 
Tomiinson, The first number of the Wreath was issued on the 6th 
of September, 1845. After ten or twelve numbers were published, 
the paper was purchased by Tomiinson. 

The sixteenth paper published in Brown County was The Taylor 
Battery, published in the town of Ripley, by J. D. Shaw. The 
Battery was a Whig campaign paper, and published only during 
the campaign of 1848. 

The seventeenth paper was The Western Literary Journal, the 
publication of which was commenced in Georgetown, by W. P. 
Stewart and G. W. King, Jr., as proprietors, and D. W. C. 
Johnson, as editor. The first number was issued September 8th, 
1849. After the publication of five or six numbers, P. McGioarty 
became editor, and William Stewart entire owner. After the 
publication of number twenty-one, Mr. Stewart became editor and 
proprietor, and continued to publish it until March, 1850, when 
he changed its head to the Democrat and Journal. 

The eighteenth pnper was the Democrat and Journal, which was 
afterward purchased of Stewart by D. W. Johnson, who united with 
Tomiinson of The Standard, which produced the Democratic Union ; 
this being the nineteenth paper, the.6rst number of which was issued 
Jan. 1st, 1851, and was continued under this firm for one year, 
when Tomiinson sold his interest to W. P. Stewart, and the paper 
was continued in the name of Johnson and Stewart until May, 
1852, when Stewart became the owner, and continued its publica- 
tion until the close of the volume, when D. W. C. Louden and 
Abraham Bailee became the owners of the Union office. The 



first number of the paper issued by them was in January, 1853; 
they continued until Septembe^f the same year, when Sullee re- 
tired, and Louden continued to publish the pnper until May, 1854, 
when one-half or the establishment was purchased by S. H. Cook! 
In October following Louden sold his interest to W. II. Suljyards. 
Mr. Sallyards also rented Cook's share, and the Union ceased to 
exist. 

The twentieth paper published in the county was The Aberdeen 
Courier; the first copy being issued from the press at Aber- 
deen, on the 3d of June, 1851, by William Brown. He continued 
to publish the paper six mouths, when he sold the establishment 
to W. II. Sallyards, who published the same until about the 1st 
of December, 1852, when it was discontinued. 

The twenty-first paper published in the comity was the Ripley 
Herald, the snmo being published by Will Tomiinson ; the ma- 
terial being owned by a company of Spiritualists. The first num- 
ber was issued on the 13th of May, 1852. The Herald advocated 
the doctrine of spiritualism. After 19 numbers of the paper had 
been issued, Mr. Tomiinson sold his interest to Oliver Baker and 
others, who changed its name to Tlie Spiritual Era ; the same 
being the twenty-fourth paper published in Brown County. 

The twenty-second paper published in the connty was a Pierce 
campaign paper for the campaign of 1852, called The Granite Hock, 
published by Will Tomiinson in Ripley] edited by A. P. Lewis 
and N. A. Devore. After the first few numbers were published, 
the paper was conducted by Mr. Tomiinson alone. 

The twenty-third paper was the Scott Battery, a Scott campaign 
pnper, for the campaign of 1852, published ut the Bee olhee In 
Ripley, and edited by .1. D. Shaw. 

The twenty-fourth paper was the Spiritual Era, a continuation 
of the Ripley Herald; the first number of which was issued Oct. 
1st, 1852, by Oliver Baker and others. The Herald was published 
nearly two years, ceasing Jan. 1st, 1854. 

The twenty-fifth paper published was the Independent American, 
published on the Union material. The first number was issued from 
the press in Georgetown, on the 9th of November, 1854. After the 
first number Thomas W. Gordon became the editor, and continued 
to conduct the editorial department until the 19th number, when he 
retired, and Win. Sallynrds took charge of it, and conducted it 
until the 28th of June, 1855, when J. II. Brown purchased Win. 
Cook's share in the office and became editor of the paper. Mr. 
Sallyards sold his interest to Brown in November, 1855. 

The twenty-sixth paper was a revival of the Union by W. P. 
Stewart, who afterward sold his prospects to John Reed & A. P. 
Harrison, after issuing one copy of tlie Union. 

The twenty-seventh paper in the county, was the Broion County 
Democrat, by Reed & Harrison, published on the material of the 
Hiplry Herald. The first number was issued from tho press in 
Georgetown, on the 3d of May, 1855, C. A. White & G. W. 
Hamer, editors August 16th, White retired. November 22d, 
Reed left the establishment, having sold to Harrison. 

The twenty-eighth paper was a continuation of the Independent 
American, under the name of the True Jeffersonian, conducted by 
J. II. Brown and W. W. Young. 

The twenty-ninth paper published in the county was a revival of 
the Democratic Standard August 26th, 1858, published by Sall- 
yards and Taylor. Edited by J. P. Fyfer and T. T. Taylor, The 
paper came out March 31st, 1*59, under the name of T. t. Taylor. 
About the 10th of May following, Taylor disposed of his interest 
in the paper to A. R. Vancleaf, and it was then published by 
Sallyards and Vancleaf, until September 8th, 1859, when Van- 
cleaf retired and the paper was continued by T. T. Taylor until 
September 15th, 1859, he having sold to John G. Doren, who 
also purchased the Brown County Democrat, the two being con- 
solidated and published under the name of The Southern Ohio 
Argus, this being the thirtieth paper published in the county. 

The thirty-first paper was The Loyal Scout, a campaign paper, 
published in Ripley during the campaign of I860, by Will 
Tomiinson. 

, On the 6th of April, 1864, L. B Reeds, having purchased of 
John B. Doren The Southern Ohio Argus, issued the first number 
of that paper in his name. In the fall of the same year he changed 
the name of the paper to The Brown County News, this being the 
thirty-second paper of the county. In 1868 Mr. Leeds associated 
his son with him iu the publication of The News. In May, 1874, 
Thos. J. Leeds retired, and since that time The News DBS been 
published by L. B. Leeds. In June, 1807, the Independent Press 
made its appearance in Ripley, published by Ward and Sellers. 
At the expiration of eight months the same was sold to Thomas 
Gliddon, who published it for a period of three or four mouths, 
when it was consolidated with the Ripley Bee. Iu January, 1870, 
W. Tomiinson began the publication of a paper in Ripley en- 
titled The Lunch Basket. At the expiration of the third month 
Mr. Tomiinson purchased an interest in The Ripley Bee, and dis- 
continued the publication of The Lunch Basket. In the spring 
of 1870, began the publication of The Reform, the paper being 
published iu the town of Ripley by a " stock company," the pub- 
lication of which terminated at the close of the sixth month. 

On the 15th of July, 1874, S. J. Housu purchased, of Reynolds 
and Baird, The Ripley Bee, and the name of the paper was changed 
to The Ripley Independent, the same being published for six 
months, when it was sold to M. J. Chase & Co., who again changed 
the name to The Ohio Valley Times. On the 20lh of July, W. 
B. Tomiinson purchased the paper, resuming the old name, 
Ripley Bee. 

The publishing of the Georgetown Sentinel, by T. J. Leeds, was 
begun during the summer of 1874. 



t(> Ripley Business References. 

Officers. 

N. B. Sly, Mayor. 

,Ym. *' orri8 > ) Counoilmen 1st Ward. 
'. G. Leggett, / 

. L. Armstrong, ) „ a «j u 
I. S. Norris, f ^ 
fW. F. Senior, 1 „ 
jj.e. Atwood, f 
Stanley Merrell, Clerk. 
!A. J. Stivers, Treasurer. 

C. Raskin, Marshal. 
Meetings on first Thursday of eaoh month. 

Attorneys, Real Estate and Insurance. 
W. H. Sly, Attoruey-at-Law. 
Chas. A. Linn, Jr., County Prosecuting Attorney. 
John MeCagoe, Fire Insurance Agent, Civil Engineer, 

and Justice of the Peaoe. 
[F. F. Shaw, Real Estate and General Agent, Notary 
Public, and Conveyancer. Real Estate bought and 
sold. Loons negotiated. Deeds, Mortgages, Power 
of Attorney, Contracts, &c, prepared with care. 
Collections made on reasonable terms. All busi- 
ness transacted with fidelity, promptness, and 
dispatch. Established in 185b. 

Banks. 

W. T. Galbreatb, Cashier of First National Bank. 
J. Reynolds & Co. (J. Reynolds, Sr., J. Reynolds, Jr.), 
Bankers and Exchange Brokers. Dealers in For- 
eign and Domestic Exchange. Collections made 
in all parts of the United States. Money received 
on deposit. Interest allowed on ppecifled time de 
posits. Established 1849. 

Hats, Caps, Boots, Shoes, &c. 
Albert Dugan, with J. J. Caldwell, Dealer in Boots, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, Gloves, and Furs, No. 16 Main 
Street. 

Joseph Bulger, Proprietor of Boot and Shoe Shop. 

Manufacturing and repairing done to order. 
Joseph Iliesser, Manufacturer of Boots aud'Shoes, near 
Ripley. 

A. Hansel, Manufacturer of and Dealer in Boots and 
Shoes of every description. Repairs of all kiud3 
promptly attended to. Main Street between Sec- 
ond and Third. 
N. Becker, Dealer in the very latest styles of Hats, 
Caps, Furs, &o. Second Street, opposite School 
Building. 

John Pfeiffer, Manufacturer and Dealer in Boots and 
hoes. Main Street, above Fourth. 

Billiards, Brewers, and Saloons, 
august Mischler, Proprietor of Brewery, Brewer, and 
Dealer in Lager and Common Beer, Second St. 
All Beer made from pure hops and barley. 
Joseph Soholter, Proprietor of Billiard Hall and Res- 
taurant, Main St. 
W. W. Hughes, Proprietor of Billiard Hall, No. 25 
Main St. 

John Pfeiffer, Proprietor of Pure Native Wine and 
Beer Saloon, in connection with Shoe Shop, Main 
St. above Fourth. 

Butchers. 

Martin Wetzel, Butcher, and Dealer in Hogs, Freah 

Meats, and Groceries. 
. P. Helbling, Pork and Beef Packer ; also Butcher 
and Proprietor of Meat Market and Dealer in Live 
Stock and Lumber. 
Jacob Gfeiger, Butcher, and Proprietor of Meat Market, 
and Dealer iu Live Stock. 

Blacksmiths, Carriages, and Wagons. 
Harvey C. Hudson, Proprietor of Blaoksmith Shop. 
Horseshoeing and Repairing of all kindB done 
promptly.. Shop on Main St. 
William Norris, Proprietor of Blacksmith, Wagou, and 
Repair Shop, corner of Second and Cheriy Sts. 
M. Greene, Proprietor of Blacksmith Shop ; Horsa- 
shoeing, Jobbing, and Repairing of all kinds 
promptly attended to. Shop on Third St. 
J. M. Hughes, Manufacturer of Spring ai i Road 
Wagons. Also, Horseshoeing and general Job 
Work. Particular attention paid to Repairing 
and Repainting "Spring Wagons. Nos. Ill and 
112 Main St. 

Bakers and Confectioners. 

Tis Reiiiert, Baker and Confectioner, Wholesale and 
Retail Dealer in Bread, Crackers Cakes, Toys, 
Candies, Nuts, &c. Seoond St. near Main. Or- 
ders from a distance attended to. 
C. Bodmer, Baker and Confectioner, Dealer in Gro- 
ceries, Cakes, Candies, Oysters, Fruits, loo Cream, 
&Oi Second St. apposite Commercial Room. 
Carpenters and BuUders. 
2. H. Bradford, Carpenter and House Joiner. Also, 
leneral Physician. Res. 4 miles north of Eiplev ' 

0. Ripley, 0. 
Jreekbaum, Carpenter and Builder; Stair Build- 
ing a specialty. Res. Hestoria, on Empire St. 
W. W. Ellis, Carpenter and Bridge Builder. Res. on 
Ripley and Arnheim Pike, 3 miles north of Ripley. 
John Griffith Carpenter, Contractor, and Bridge 
Builder. Res. on Ripley and Bradysville Pike, 
5J miles N. R. of Ripley. 



Coopers. 

L. Ladenberger, Proprietor of Cooper Shop ; Manufac- 
turer of Flour and Pork Barrels, Lard Tierces, 
and all kinds of Cooperage. Shop on North Main 
Street. 

Jordan Braun, Manufacturer of all kinds of Cooperage. 

Orders promptly attended to. 
Max Pfeiffer, Manufacturer of all kiudB of Cooperage. 
All orders filled with promptness. 



Druggists. 

Morgan Fnlton, with R. Fulton, Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in Drugs and Groceries. Groceries, Drugs, 
Cl ei/iicals, White Lead, Glass, Linseed Oil, Tur- 
pentine, Putty, Perfumery, Toilet Articles, Trusses, 
Coal Oil, Lamps, &c, always on hand. Corner of 
Main and Second Sts. Also, Proprietors of Livery 
Stable on Main St. 

W. C. Beyersdorfer, Druggist, with K. Fulton. 

M. M. Murphy, Bookkeeper, with 3. Fulton, Druggist. 

M. Hauser, Dealer in Drugs, Medicines, Wines and 
Liquors, Cigars, Tobacco, Perfumery, Trusses, 
Glass, Faints, Oils, Varnishes, Louisville Lime, 
Cement, Brushes, Lanterns, Lamps, &c. &c. No. 
14 Main St. 

William Maddox, Dealer in Drugs, Medicines, Chemi- 
cals Paints, Oils, Glass, Turpentine, Lamps, Per- 
fumery, Toilet Articles, &c. A specialty made of 
Fine Toilet Soaps. Also, Proprietor of " M addox's 
Japanese Coogh Balsam" and " Maodox's Japa- 
nese Toothache Remedy." Laboratory corner of 
Main and Second Streets. Also keeps for sale 
"Tiftosn," Unfermented Juice of the Catawba 
Grape, the only wine fit for the communion table 
or medical purposes, and is recommended by min- 
isters of all denominations and physicians. Pre- 
pared by J. S. Reynolds, Sr., Ripley, 0. 

Stanley Merroll, Drug and Grocer Clerk with Geo. W. 
Shaw. Sole Agent for Mbrrell's Corrective Coa- 



Dry Goods, Groceries, and Provisions. 

William Stepp, Dealer in Groceries, Provisions, No- 
tions, Crockery, Glassware, &c. Also, Wholesale 
Dealer in Native Wines. Main St. 

L. Couu, Proprietor of Grocery and Notion Store, and 
General Dealer iu Pork, Tobacco, Grain, &c. Res. 
and Store on Hillsborough Pike, near Ripley. 

R. D. Kiucaid, Dealer in Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots, 
and Shoes. Corner of Main aud Front Sts., oppo 
site Steamboat Lauding. 

E. McKinloy, Dealer in Groceries, Provisions, Notions, 
Tobacco, Cigars, Crockery, Wooden-ware, &c, on 
Second St. benveeu Sycamore and Locust. 

Geo. W. Shaw Wholesale and Retail Dealer in- Staple 



Fauoy Grt 
Corner of Ma 
for Cliff Mine 
M. Liui 



id 



and Queensi 
Also, Sole Agent 



Que. 



Mai u St. 



Boot3, Sh 



i all kinds of Notions, 
, Ready-made Clothing, 
hing Goods 



Qaiwal Supply Store. 
Mrs 11. U. liercaw. Dealer 

Groceries and ProvisU 

Ladies' and Gents' Fur 

scription. Corner of Fourth and Main Sts" 
•H. Thompson, Dealer in Groceries, Produce, Flour 

Queens ware, Notions, Stone and Willow- tTOTe. 

No. 35 Main St. 

Editors, Publishers, and Printers. 
W. B. Ton- 



William P. Reynolds, Plain and Fancy Job Printer. 
Second St., Ripley, 0. 

Foundries and Machine Shops. 

John P. Parker, Proprietor of Phoenix Foundry and 
Machine Shop, Manufacturer of Threshing Ma- 
chines, Stationary and Portable Steam Engines, 
Mill Gearing, Sugar Mills and Pans, Iron and 
Brass Castings, &o. Cash paid for Old Iron. 

John C. Carey, Manufacturer of Ralston's Patent 
Thresher and Cleaner, Wagons, Plows. Agricul- 
tural Implements of all kinds. Repairs promptly 
attended to. Shop on Second Street between 
Market and Mulberry. 

Flour, Grain, and Feed. 

M. Schilling, Proprietor of " Bpckeye Mills," and 
Dealer in Flour, Grain, Feed, &c. On Hillsborough 
Piko near Ripley. 

Robert Campbell, Grain Merchant, of the firm of S. 
Hemphill & Co. 

S. Hemphill & Co. (S. Hemphill, R. Campbell) For- 
warding and Commission Merchants, Dealers in 
Flour, Grain, Seeds, Coal, Salt, &o. Highest cash 
price paid for Grain. Business entrusted to us 
will be promptly attended to. Main Street, bet. 
4th and 6th. 

John W. Tweed, Proprietor of " Westekx Mills," 
Manufacturer of choice Brands of Flour, aud 
Dealer iu Grain and Mill Feed. West Second St. 

Furniture. 

Belcbambers & Maddox, Wholesale and Retail Dealers 
iu Furniture. Repairs promptly attended to. 
Main Street near Third. 
L. Grim & Sou, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Fur- 
niture of every Description. Piotures framed and 
Mounted to order. French aud Rustic Window 
Shades in great variety. Undertaking iu all its 
branches. Repairs of all kinds will receive prompt 



attention. No. 44 Main Street. 

Hotels. 



Bank Hotbl. Wm. Jenkins, Proprietor, opposite Steam- 
boat Lauding. All Stages st.^. at this House. 

Latosa House. J. H. Carrett, Proprietor. This House 
has beeu refurnished and refitted, and we can 
assure the travelling public first-class accommo- 
dations. Sample Rooms on first floor. Free 
Hack to and from all boats. .Main Street. 

Lime, Brick, and Plaster. 

Robert Carr, Contractor and Plasterer, and Dealer in 
Lime, Plaster Paris, Cement, aud all kinds of 
Plastering Material. Residence on 4th Street 
opposite Catholio Church. 

B. S. Norris, Contractor and Dealer in Briok, Li me and 
Building Material. Res. on 4th above Market St. 




Saw and Planing Mills. 

Mockbee k Co. (C. Baird, W. L. Mockbee, E. R. Bell, 
W. B. Campbell), Proprietors of the Champion 
Saw aud Placing Mills, Door, Sash, and Blind 
Factory. OffiYes Front Street, Ripley, 0., & opp. 
M. & L. R. R. Depot, Maysville, Ky. 

Joseph K. Vance, Foreman iu Champion Saw and 
Planing Mills. 

Marble Works. 

Lorenz. Reichmann, Dealer in Tombstones, Monu- 
ments, Mantels, and all kinds of Marble work. 
Shops on Second Street. 

W. H. Harrison, Proprietor of Ripley Marble and 
Granite Works. Importer and Manufacturer of 
all kinds of Scotch and Amerioan Granite, Ita'ian 
and American Marble for Monuments, Headstones, 
&c. 



Physicians and Surgeons. 

W. A. Dixon, Physician and Surgeon. Residence 
Office on Main Street, between 2d and 3d. 

E. R. Bell, Physician and Surgeon. Residence ^ 
Office on Main Street, opposite Fifth. 

J, L. Wylie, Physician aud Surgeon. Residence and 
Office on Second Street, near Market. 

A. N. Wylie, Physician and Surgeon. 

G. W. Phipps, Physician and Surgeon. Offic 
Second Street, between Main and Market. 
T. Prickett, Physician and Snrgeou, especial treat- 
ment of Cancers and Scrofula. Res. near lliple?- 




Union 



Leaf To- 
rs Gap 3 



Inches fn th» MHe 

Tobacco, Pork, and Stock Dealers, 

Stephenson & Fitch, Traders and Dealers i: 
biieco and Stock. Warehouse at Log; 
miles E. of Ripley. P. 0. Ripley. 
D avid Dixon, Farmer and Dualer in Blooded stuck, 
Berkshire Hogs, Fine Blooded Horses and Sheep. 

___ Aruheim Pike 4 mites from Ripley. 
P. 0. Ripley. 

Robert Cochran, Trader and Dealer in Pork, Tobacco, 
and Stock. Residence on Georgetown and Ripley 
"ike 7 miles N. of Ripley and 3 miles south of 
Georgetown. P. O. Georgetown. 

A - B, Martin, Farmer and Dealer in Tobaeoo, Pork, 
and Stock. Residence on Surrey 1(341. P. 0. 
Ripley, 

John F. Cochran, Dealer in Leaf Tobacco, Pork, and 
Lituioer, on 3d Street between Main and Cherry 

Streets. 

John W. Frost, Dealer in Leaf Tobacco and Por^ 
^has A. Unm Sen., Dealer in Tobacco, Pork, and 
Grain. Residence on Second Street near Mul- 
berry. 



"Valley Gem" Piano Factory. 

M. J. Chase, President. 

W. P. Senior, Foreman. 

E. T. Nardin, Tuner. 

A. E. Chase, Piano Maker. 

A. Sydney Chase, Piano Maker. 

W. P. Chase, " " 

David N. Daly, Varnisher. 

Chas. Hough, Piano Maker. 

P. Beuua, Salesman. 

G. W. Early, Agent for Valley Gem and Deoker Bro'a 
Pianos and Estey and Hamilton Organs. 



gJosepl) SI<-palt, Gardener and Fruit Grower, Dealer iu 
^ Wine. &c. Residence, Hestoria. 
J. E. Stephenson, School Teacher. Resilience on Mays- 

villu Pike, one mile east of Ripley. 
John W. Wheeler, Fashionable Barber, No. -S Main 
Street. 



W.'Lokey, Manufacturer of Saddles, Bridles, Harness, 
and Collars. Also has the Celebrated Excelsior 
Spring Seat Saddle, Main Street. 
J. K. Gieeuhow, Painter and Decorator, 3d Street above 

Main, 



Oar aboii 1b warm and water hot, you'll find the barber on [he 
Times are hard, tbe barber 1b poor : gentlemen, please don't pass 

J. C. Leggett, Hardware Dealer, sign of the Big Saw. 
C. Zauuiseil, Watch Maker and Dealer in Watches, 
Clocks, and Fine Jewelry, Silver and Plated Ware, 
Spectacles, &o. All kinds of Repairing and En- 
graving neatly executed. No. 12 Main Street. 
™ (J. W. Meu.-tugli, Merchant Tailor. A fit guaranteed, 
Also Agent for the Remington Sewing Machine 
and Machine Applianoes. 



H. Downing, Dealer in Pomeroy, Youghiogheny, Semi- 
Canuel and Ohio River Coal and Salt. 
11 lather yoa well and ibave Mrs. N. Becker, Milliner and Dealer in Millinery Goods, 
Fancy Articles, Ribbons, Laces, &c, 2d Street, 
opposite School Building. 
M. Beyersdoerfer, Manufacturer of and Wholesale and 
Retail Dealer in Cigars, Snuff, Smoking and Chew- 
ing Tobacco, Main Street between 2d and 3d. 
Wis. Volf, Proprietor of Brass Foundry and Manufac- 
turer of Sewing Machine Attachments. Plate Baf- 
flers and Hemmers a specialty. Repairs all kinda 
of Machinery. Manufactures Piano Hardware and» 
other articles. Main Street between 3d and 4th. 



I 



18 



HISTORY OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO — Continued. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 



Among the early settlers in this township were Jacob Burgett, 
Aaron Burgett, Valentine Burgett, Walter Wall, John Maeklin, 
James Roney, John Honey, James Calvin, Amos Moore, Sr., Wm. 
Lyon James Woods, Nathaniel Woods, Henry RalsLou, Robert 
Sample, Stephen Calvin, RobertWright, Samuel Ellis, Samuel Ross, 
James Curry, Robert Curry, Edward Hull, Sr., Edward Hull, Jr., 
Fielding Martin, Jaines Hamilton, Amos Mitchell, James Mc- 
Kiiiney°James Louden from Mason County, Ky., emigrated with 
his mother to Adams, now Brown County, Ohio, in the year 1806, 
and settled on a lease of land belonging to Capt. Washburn, the 
same being now owned by John B. Clifton, and located in Jeffer- 
son Township. Mr. Louden was at that time ten years old. 
Among the settlers living in the neighborhood at that time, were 
Alexander Jolly, David Devore, Neil, and Joseph Washburn, 
James Works, Isaac Pritehett, Joseph Newman, John Phillips, 
Robert Fortius. Mrs. Louden had a family of Ihree children, viz., 
Charles, James, and Nancy, only one of whom (James) is now 
living, Thomas E. Allen, a native of the State of Maryland, 
emigrated from the State of Kentucky during the year 1800, and 
settled on the Ohio River near the town of Ripley. After remain- 
ing here a short lime he purchased fifty acres of land on " While 
Oak*' Creek, one mile west of Georgetown, giving in exchange for 
the same a horse valued at sixty-live dollars. After remaining 
here a few years he removed to Bethel, Clermont County, Ohio. 
Mr. Allen had a family of nine children. Walter Wall, a native of 
Pennsylvania, came to this county and settled in this township at an 
early day. He came with his family in an open boat from Pitts- 
burg, and settled on the land now owned by his son, William 
Wall. The place where he settled was in an unbroken forest, 
without so much as a cabin to protect him from the weather. 
Among the early settlers of this township not mentioned were 
John Liggett, John Mefford, Joshua Jordan, Thomas Rodgers, 
Abram Sells, William, Isaac, and Amos Ellis, Archibald Tweed, 
John and Robert Forsythe. 

The first church organization in the township was at " Free 
Soil Ridge," as early as the year 1800. The first church build- 
ing erected was a double-log church built by the Presbyterians. 
The second church building erected was a Methodist church 
called Hillman's Church, in the southeastern part of the township. 

Pleasant township contains twenty-two thousand four hundred 
and fifty acres of land, valued at six hundred and sixty-six thou- 
sand three hundred and eighteen dollars, chattel property to the 
amount of two hundred and twenty-three thousand four hundred 
and thirty-five dollars, value of property in towns and villages 
one hundred and fifty thousand nine hundred and fifty-five dollai's, 
making a total valuation of one million two hundred and sixty 
thousand live hundred nnd sixty dollars. It also contains fifteen 
school districts, with an enumeration of nine hundred and thirty- 
eight children between the ages of six and twenty-one years, and 
a voting population of five hundred and forty-four. 

GEORGETOWN. 

Allen Woods was among the first settlers in this vicinity, and 
hud out the north part of the town (on land previously purchased 
by him) December 10, 1819. Henry Newkirk soon after laid out 
the south part of the town ; additions having since been made by 
J. G. Marshall and C. A. White. The land on which the town 
was laid out was at that time covered with a dense growth of 
underbrush and timber, at the same lime being very wet and 
marshy. Duvid Johnson, from Hillsboro, was the first man of 
business in the town ; he engaging in the mercantile business as 
early as the year 1820. Mr. Johnson was followed by Charles 
White, James Clark, John J. Higgins, Thomas L. Hamer, and 
others. During the latter part of the year 1820, the county seat 
was located, and the first term of court held in the village. The 
first hotel was a large building, creeled by Allen Woods, on the 
site where the "American House" now stands. Johnson & 
Hughes engaged in the pork business as early as 1820. The fol- 
lowing notice of their business occurred in the Benefactor, a 
paper published at Levannn: " We will pay §2.50 in silver, per 
hundred, for corn-fed pork, or $3.00 in Kentucky notes — George- 
town, Ohio* Nov. 23, 1820— Johnson & Hughes." The Chris- 
tian Church (New-light) was organized in 1825 by Elder Gard- 
ner, this being the first church organization in the village. The 
church building was of brick, built by subscription, and paid for 
mostly in trade. The second church built in the town was that 
of the Presbyterians, organized and built during the year 1826. 
The building was of brick, and was erected on the site of the 
present church of this denomination. Among the members of 
this church were Dr. Buckner, the Macklin and Shepherd families. 
The next church organized in the village was the Baptist Church, 
organized during the year 1827, the principal members being Job, 
Egbert, Edward Thompson, and Joseph Stitt. The Methodist 
Church was organized and a church built about the year 1827 by 
George Maley. The first building was of brick, and stood near 
the present site of the woollen mill. The present M. E. church was 
erected in 1846 ; the Presbyterian church in 1853. George- 
town now contains five dry goods stores, two clothing stores, seven 
groceries, two stove and tin-ware stores, one saddle and harness 
shop, one woollen factory, one saw and grist mill, three hotels, 
three churches, one bank, one carriage shop, five blacksmith shops, 
one furniture store, two carpenters, six physicians, fifteen law- 
yers, one union school of five rooms. The village has a popula- 
tion of fourteen hundred. 



Thomas Lyon Hamer-wbs born in Northumberland County, 
Pennsylvania, in the month of July, 1800. In or about the year 
1812 his father removed to the State of New York, and settled 
in the vicinity of Lake Charnplain, where he remained until the 
year 1817, when he emigrated to Butler County, Ohio, and set- 
tled near the present village of Oxford. His son Thomas left 
him at the mouth of " Nine-Alile Creek," on the Ohio River, where 
he engaged in teaching school. At the close of his first terra of 
school lie immediately procured another at the village of Withams- 
ville, and at a later date taught school in the town of Bethel, 
where he boarded with the family of Thomas Morris, under whose 
instructions he pursued the study of law. In the spring of 1821 
he was admitted to the Bar at Williamsburg, then the county 
seat of Clermont County. In the following August he removed 
to Georgetown, and began the practice of his profession. In the 
year 1825 Mr. Hamer was elected representative for Brown 
County. In the year 1829 he was again elected to the Legisla- 
ture, and wus chosen speaker of the House of Representatives. 
In the year 1833 he was elected to Congress from his district. 
At the beginning of the war with Mexico he enlisted as a private 
soldier, but was soon promoted to the command of an Ohio 
brigade. During his term of service in the army he was again 
elected (October, 1846) to Congress from his district. On the 
3d day of December, 1846, he died near Monterey, while yet in 
the service of his country. His remains were brought to George- 
town, and interred February 13, 1847. Mr. Hamer was regarded 
as an able nnd successful lawyer, the oracle of his neighborhood,, 
beloved and venerated ; only an extended history would do justice 
to his memory. 

Jesse R. Grant, father of U. S. Grant, located here at an 
early day, and was engaged in the tanning business. He was also 
a prominent man in the "Whig purty" in its day. A racy ac- 
count is given in the Ohio Freeman (published at Georgetown by 
John Dull'ey), on May II, 1839, of the charter election, at which 
it, appears Jesse R. Grant was a candidate for Mayor, but de- 
feated by John Smiley. The article closes with these lines — more 
emphatic than poetic: — . 

" Float high and broad our city's banner, 

We're ruled no loiignr by a tanner 1 

The despot's laws are all repeal'd, 

And all their folly stands revealM ! 

A tailor now lias got the swav, 

Which he will keep until next May ; 

And then if be but cuts and slitdies plain, 

We'll try to make him Mayor again. 

But if be cuts to make a swell, 

And does not do his duty well, 

We'll serve him as we did friend G 1, 

And be oar Mayor again he shan't." 

Here is also the home of G. W. King, the first Prosecuting 
Attorney for Brown County. At the organization of the county 
Mr. King was a resident of Ripley, but removed to Georgetown 
in a short time after it became the county seat. Mr. King has 
been an able nnd successful lawyer, and, although advanced in 
years, still continues the practice of his profession. 

LEWIS TOWNSHIP. 

William Trout was born in Lincoln County, North Carolina, 
in 1786. In 1809 he removed from there to Clermont (now 
Brown) County, Ohio, and settled on a branch of Bullskin Creek, 
a few miles from the Ohio River, on the land now owned by 
James Miller. There was living in the vicinity at that time 
Joseph Clark, who afterward built a sawmill on the creek. Aside 
from these two men and their families, there were no other resi- 
dents nearer than Felicity, a distance of several miles. During 
the next year (1810) there came into the vicinity John Hoss, 
from North Carolina; the Logans and Wells, from Kentucky. 
Robert Higghis was born in Virginia, in the year 1750, and served 
as captain in the continental army during the war of the "Revolu- 
tion ;" was taken prisoner at the battle of Gerinantown, and was 
kept as such on Long Island during the last three years of the 
war. In 1796 he emigrated from the South Branch of the Po- 
tomac River to Brown County, Ohio, and settled on a survey of 
1000 acres of laud, obtained for services in the army, in the south 
part of this township, including the present town of Higginsport, 
which was laid out by him. He died in the year 1825. Jesse 
Printy is also au early settler in this township. He was born 
near Trenton, New Jersey, in 1784, and removed to Mason 
County, Kentucky, in the year 1796. After remaining there 14 
years he removed to Lewis Township, Brown County, Ohio, and 
settled on Bullskin Creek, taking a lease from Richard K. Mead, 
on the land now in the name of Calvin Tegarden. There were 
living at that time in this vicinity Joseph Clark and John Bowd ; 
the latter kept the first ferry between Augusta and the Ohio side 
of the river. James Roney built a log mill on White Oak Creek, 
in the year 1800, which is said to have been the first built in the 
county. John Sargent, Ephraim Minor, and Nathaniel Norris 
were also early settlers in this township. John Bowd was the 
first sheriff of Clermont County ; Lewis Township being a part 
of Clermont County at that time (1800). Zion M. E. Church 
was among the first places of worship in the township ; the build- 
ing was a hewed-log house, built for school purposes ; afterward 
used for a church. 

Higginsport, in the south part of the township, was laid out 
by Robert Higgins, in the year 1804, on a tract of land entered 
by him in the Virginia military laud district. The town contains 
3 dry-goods stores, 5 groceries, 2 drug stores, 3 hardware stores, 



1 distillerv, 1 sawmill, 10 tobacco warehouses, 2 pork houses, 4 
churches, "viz : 1 Christian, 1 Presbyterian, 1 Lutheran, and 1 
German Methodist; Masonic, Odd Fellow, and Good Templar 
Lodges, 3 physicians, 1 graded school, 2 hotels, 1 livery stable, 3 
coal yards, 2 wagon and 3 blacksmith shops. The town contains 
about 800 inhabitants; has daily communication with George- 
town and all points on the Ohio River. 

Feesburg, a small village in the north part of the township, 
was laid out in 1834, by Thomas Fee, who was engaged in the 
mercantile business. It now contains 3 stores, 3 churches, viz.: 
1 Methodist, 1 Presbyterian, and 1 Christian ; 1 school, 2 wagon 
and 2 blacksmith shops, and post-office, and 200 inhabitants. 
The township has in all 9 churches and 13 schools, with an enu- 
meration of 1139 children, including 350 belonging to the sepa- 
rate school district of Higginsport. It also contains seventeen 
miles of free turnpike, has n voting population of 525, and a tux- 
able valuation of $1,270,559. 

JEFFERSON TOWNSHIP. 

Jefferson Township was originally a part of Byrd, including 
also small parts of Jackson and Franklin, organized in 1853. 
John McMahan and George Brown were elected magistrates at 
the first election, in November, 1853. 

Samuel Pilson, wife, and three children, viz. : James, John, and 
Jane, removed from Augusta County, Virginia, in the mouth of 
November, 1807, and settled in what is now Jefferson (then Byrd) 
Township, where he remained until his death in 1848, aged 80 
years. James, his oldest sou, is now still living on the old home- 
stead of his father, and is the oldest person now living in the 
township, being- in his 80th year. He was appointed surveyor by 
the court of Adams County, at the age of 20 years, and was 
afterward surveyor of Brown County. In 1831 and '32 he was a 
member of the House of Representatives, his opponent being 
Jesse R. Grant, father of the present president of the United 
States. In 1834 and '35 he represented Adams and Brown 
counties in the State Senate. 

Among the early settlers of this township were George Baird, 
A brum Shepherd, Col. Edwards, Benj. Garner, John Mann, Levi 
Laycock, Bazil Thomas, Aleck Glaize, the Washburns, Ken- 
netts, Glaziers, Brocknways, and Shaws. 

The first school of the township was on the land of James 
Baird. The first church was that of the Presbyterians, built on 
the land now owned by James Baird — Reuben White minister. 

Jeral Donalson was born 1767, came to this military district 
in the year 1790, was taken by the Indians in 1791, made his 
escape about ten days afterward, reaching Fort Washington. He 
was with Wayne's expedition against the Indians, heard the can- 
non that proclaimed the passage of the " Declaration of Inde- 
pendence." He died in I860, aged 90 years. 

RUSSELLVILLE, 

On the Ripley and Hillsborough turnpike, is distant ten miles 
from the former, and seven miles from Georgetown. It was laid 
out in the year 181 6, by Russell Shaw, and named for him. Russell- 
ville has always been noted for its churches, of which it contains 
seven. It also contains several stores and shops, one flouring 
mill, two hotels, and about 400 inhabitants. The township con- 
tains in all ten churches and five schools, with an enumeration of 
300 children, exclusive of Russellville, which has an enumeration 
of 1G8, making a total of 468. The voting population of the 
township numbers 256. 

Taxable valuation of township, exclusive of Russellville, 
$426,510. Russellville, $125,465. Total $551,975. 

CLARK TOWNSHIP 

Is one of the original townships of Brown County, from which 
Pike township was stricken off March 23, 1823. Thomns West 
was born in Pennsylvania, in 1785. In 1788, at the age of three 
years, he emigrated to Kentucky with his grandfather, and settled 
in Bourbon County. After remaining there twelve years, they emi- 
grated to Ohio, and settled in Clermont County, on the land where 
David Hoover now lives, in Franklin township. In 1808, he was 
married to Barbara Gray, and in 1814 they removed to Lewis 
township, in Brown County, and settled on the laud now owned 
by Solomon Bolander. They had a family of ten children, three 
boys and seven girls, seven of whom are now living. Mr. West now 
resides with his son, Z. West, in Clark township, his wife having 
died in I860, at the age of 75 years. He is probably the oldest 
man now living in the township, having attained the age of 90 
years. He is still a vigorous and active man for that age, and 
can readily see to read the finest print without the aid of 
spectacles. 

Among the early settlers of the township, were John Frazee, 
John Brooks, Matthew Coulter, Amos Stevens, James Dnncanson, 
William Neal. Sr., John Hester, George Flake, Nathaniel Moore, 
Louis Thompson, David Ogden, Thomas Early. David Ogden 
was from New York, and came to Ohio in- 1815, and settled in 
Hamilton County, where he remained two years, and then removed 
to this township in 1817, and settled on the land now owned by 
Dr. Robinson. Brooks was from North Carolina, Duncanson 
from Long Island. Thomas Early was a native of Virginia, where 
he was born in 17S5, from whence he removed to Ohio in 1816, and 
settled in Clermont County; after a period of four years he 
removed to Brown. He is said to have been the first man to 
haul produce to Cincinnati from Brown County in a wagon. 



HISTORY OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO — Continued. 



23 



HAMERSVILIE 

Was laid out in the year by Nathaniel Moore and George 

Flake. It now contains 4 stores, 1 stirrup factory, 3 simps, 
1 church, 1 school, post-office, 1 saw mill, 2 physicians, Odd 
Fellows' and Good Templars' lodges, and one "Order of the 
Patrons of Husbandry " 

The township has 3 churches, viz., one Christian Union, one 
Christian, and one M. E. It also contains seven schools with an 
enumeration of 547, a voting population of 207, and a taxable 
valuation of $520,707. 

HUNTINGTON TOWNSHIP. 

This township was organized prior to its being stricken from 
Adams Comity. Its position is in the southeast part of Brown, 
bordering on Adams County, and the Ohio River, the surface is 
very much diversified, the hind bordering on the river is compara- 
tively level, while in the interior, and north, rough and hilly. 

Benjamin Bcasly, Sr., was the first settler within the limits of 
this township. He was a native of Virginia, from whence he re- 
moved to Kentucky in the year 1789 ; after remaining there seven 
years he removed to Ohio, and settled on what is now known as 
Beasly's Kun in the year 1796, on the land now owned by^Mrs. 
Grimes, his granddaughter. During the next year, there came 
James Parker, from Penna., Wm. Gilberts, Uriah White, John 
and William Hiatt, John Evans, John Housh, John Cruse, Geo. 
Harrison, John Gunsaulus, Ellis Palmer. 

Evan Campbell, a native of Redstone, Penna., emigrated to 
Kentucky, and settled at "Brooks Bar" three miles above Lime- 
stone (now Maysville), some years prior to 1800. In or about 
the year 1800, he purchased a tract of land in Ohio opposite 
Maysville, Ky., and moved upon it. There was living at that 
time, upon the present site of Aberdeen, Nathan Ellis, who owned 
the land now occupied by the town. Ellis afterward established 
the first ferry between Ohio and Kentucky, in this vicinity, which 
he kept for a number of years. He also planted an orchard in 
the river bottom where the town now stands, which is supposed to 
have been the first planted in Brown County. Previous to the 
organization of a school on this side of the river, the children 
were sent aeross the river to Maysville. In 1817, a log school 
house was erected on the land of Evan Campbell, one mile north- 
east of town, a Mr. Caiderwood being employed to teach the first 
school for $2.50 per scholar, for a term of three months. Previous 
to a church organization, the people attended services in Ken- 
tucky. The first church organization in the township was by the 
Rev. Wood, in the year 1800, said organization being Baptist. 
A few years afterward, a Methodist organization was effected at 
the house of James Dennis, on the land now owned by John 
Brookover. Among those who belonged to this organization, 
were the Campbells, Dennis', McCauleys, Kilgores. 

The first church built in the township, was Bethlehem Church, 
built by the New Lights on Slickaway Creek, in 1829. The 
building was of brick, and was blown down by a storm in 1860, 
and replaced with a frame building the same year. The Presby- 
terian church at Huntington was the second church erected in the 
township, built about the year 1830. The M. E. church in Aber- 
deen was erected in 1845. Jesse Ellis, sou of Nathan Ellis, is 
| now the^oldest man living in the township, lie being in his 9GtU 
year. Nathan Ellis was the first "justice of the peace" in the 
township, after whom Thomas Shelton was elected, who held the 
office for 44 successive years. He was born in Stafford County, 
Va., 1776, and in 1812 emigrated to Brown County. In 1816, 
he was elected justice of the peace for Huntington township, 
which ofiice he held without interruption until his death (1860). 
He was perhaps the most remarkable man of his section, from 
the fact that he had officiated at the solemnization of more 
marriages than any person in the United States. It has been 
estimated that he has united in the bonds of wedlock over four 
thousand persons. Hundreds of young people, whose parents 
were unfavorable to their plans, have flown to the old "Squire" 
and found his services an efficient remedy for their misfortunes. 
He always claimed that the majority of his marriages were happily 
made, aud if they turned out to the contrary, he consoled himself 
with the reflection that his own part was well done, and he was 
not to blame. The old gentleman, for many years previous to his 
death, had a peculiar passion for buying or trading watches, and 
it was said that he seldom made a good trade. He has purchased 
as many as six watches within a week, aud traded litem for others 
within that same time. He was a zealous and lifelong democrat, 
taking great interest in the progress and prosperity of his party, 
and never voting any other ticket. After the death of Shelton, 
Massie Beusly was elected justice of the peace, who has remained 
in office until the present time. 

ABERDEEN. 

This town was laid out July 5, 1816, by Nathan Ellis, James 
Powers' addition in 1*832, Jno. Beasly's 1st addition 1841, 2d 
1845, 3d 1850. The first man of businessin the town was Arthur 
Mitchell, who was in the mercantile business. Succeeding him were 
Andrew Scott, James G. Lane, and Wm. Parker. The town now 
contains 2 drygoods stores, 2 blacksmith shops, 1 wagon shop, 
1 tannery, 1 hotel, 2 livery stables, lumber and coal yard, aud 1 
commission house, 1 school, 2 churches, Masonic, Odd Fellows, 
and Good Templar lodges. The township contains in all 5 
churches, viz., 2 Christian, 1 Baptist, 1 Presbyterian, 1 M. E. 



No. of school districts 13, with an enumeration of 809. Separate 
district of Aberdeen 311, voting population 435. 

Taxable valuation of township . . $757,164 
" " Aberdeen * . 134,727 

Total taxable valuation . $891, S91 

PIKE TOWNSHIP. 

This township, originally a part of Clark, was organized March 
3, 1823; the survey being made by John MeButh. The first, 
man who came to this township was John Allen, who came here 
in 1S10, while it was yet a part of Clermont County. Mr. Allen 
settled on Sterling Creek near the centre of the township on the 
land now in the possession of the heirs of Mrs. Blair. He was 
soon after followed by Joshua Archer, William Still, mid George 
Sheik. These men were known as " squatters," and located four 
miles from New Hope, which was the nearest settlement. John 
Allen was the first to make a purchase fora permanent settlement, 
buying 1200 acres of land in ihe survey of Benj. Holmes. Mr. 
Allen bought of the agent of Holmes in the year 1824, paying 
two dollars per acre for his land. He continued the purchase of 
land by the survey until he was the owner of 3100 acres, lying on 
both sides of Sterling Creek. This he sold in quantities to suit 
purchasers at different periods; unfortunately for him the pur- 
chasers were compelled in a short time to pay §3.00 per acre for 
the land which they had bought of Allen for $2'.00, in consequence 
of his title to the same not being genuine. 

In 1824 Mr. Allen was appointed colonel of a regiment of 
militia,, and so rapidly had the county been settled that he mus- 
tered on the farm, where he had settled aaa squatter fourteen vears 
before, his regiment of men, numbering eight hundred ran It and 
file. Joseph Keethler, Christopher Day, Robert Allen, Vinson 
Brown, Robert Allen, Hutehins Allen, Jasper Shotwell, Troiii Ky., 
John Earhart, from Pennsylvania, Joshua Lambert, Henry Moyer, 
James and Jonathan Hunt, were among the early pioneers of 
this township. The first church organization was a Methodist, 
church on Sterling Creek in 1823, services being held at private 
houses \ those of Joseph Keethler and John Allen being the 
most prominent. John Allen was the first justice of the peace 
in the township, elected in 1824, which office he held for twelve J 
years. Vinson Brown and Martha Allen were the first persons 
united in marriage in the township, aud the child first born in the 
township was Sauford Allen, son of John Allen, born in 1810. 
The first school was taught by Joseph Ralston in a log-cabin on 
the land of John Allen in the year 1817. The same was taught 
by subscription, the tuition being $1.25 per quarter, and the 
number of pupils twelve, making $15 per quarter, or $5.00 per 
month for his services. The school was supported by John Allen, 
Joseph Keethler, Christopher Day, Samuel Jones, aud Vinson 
Brown. Robert and Charles Brown of this township were among 
the pupils of said school. 

New Harmony, laid out by E. B. Wharton, is a small village 
in this township. 

The township also contains one M. E. and one M. P. church ; 
eight schools ; 493-ehildren between the ages of six and twenty- 
one years; aud a taxable valuation of §301,968. Voting 
population 221. 

SCOTT TOWNSHIP. 

Among the early settlers of this township were Henry Suraalt, 
Joshua Davison, Francis and Tlwmas Myers, Robert Davison, 
Benjamin aud Nicholas Smith, John McBeth, Robert McBelh, 
John Stansberry, Jacob Fite, James Norris, Jonathan Natwood, 
Robert McCall, John Pitzcr. Henry Sumalt was a native of 
Harrison County, Ky., from whence he removed to Clermont 
(now Brown) County, Ohio, and settled on White Oak Creek, 
below the present village of New Hope, and built the first mill in 
the township in the year 1813. The property on which Sumalt 
located is now owned by Henry Davison. Joshua Davison settled 
on the land now owned by John and Samuel McCall. The Myer 
brothers (Francis and Thomas) located on White Oak Creek op- 
posite the village of New Hope. The property is now in the pos- 
session of John Sams and Orman Dunn. Robert Davison located 
on the creek just above the village, on the land where William 
Espy now lives. The Smith brothers (Benjamin and Nicholas) 
settled on White Oak Creek about two miles south of the village, 
on the laud now owned by Marshall Patton and William Martin's 
heirs. John and Robert McBeth were natives of Pennsylvania; 
they emigrated to Ohio at an early day and settled in this town- 
ship on 800 acres of land purchased by their father in survey 
1213, which he divided between the two boys. Henry Wanllow 
now ownes the land where John McBeth settled, and Henry 
Young where Robert settled. John Stansberry was a native of 
Virginia, Jacob Fite from Kentucky, James Norris from Vermont, 
Jonathan Natwood from Vermont, Robert McCall from Kentucky, 
William White from Kentucky, and John Hill from Ireland, were 
also early settlers of this township, as also David Reynolds who 
built a mill on the site of the present one in "New Hope" in the 
year 1822. 

There are two churches in the township, viz., one M. E. and 
one Christian. The M. E. church in New Hope was built in the 
year 1851. Previous to the erection of this building the congre- 
gation worshiped in a log church which stood on the land of 
Godfrey Kitterring within the suburbs of the village. 

The Christian church on the pike two miles south of the village 



was built in 1874 ; previous to this the denomination worshipped 
in a log house one mile north of the town, on the land now owned 
by Peter MeKee. Martin Gales and Francis Myers were the 
first justices of the peace in the township. New Hope, situated 
seven miles from Georgetown, on the Georgetown aud Mt. Orab 
turnpike and White Oak Creek, contains two stores; two shops ; 
one hotel; one church and school; one grist mill ; carding' ma- 
chine ; two physicians ; post-office ; ttnd one hundred inhabitants. 

The township also contains six school districts ; 342 white and 
24 colored children between the ages of six and twenty-one years, 
with a voting population of 206, aud a taxable valuation of 
$352,919. 

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP. 

Washington township was organized December 2, 1S22-, the 
first election being held January 1, 1823, at the honso of Henry 
Dunn, lor the election of the necessary township offices. 

William Wardrow is supposed to have been the first settler in 
this township. He was a native of Virginia; from there he emi- 
grated to Kentucky, and from there to Washington township as 
early as 1805 or '0, and settled in the lower part of the township, 
at the forks of White Oak Creek. He had a large Family of 
children. His sot) William was a volunteer during the war of 1-812, 
during which time disease terminated his life. His other children 
all .settled in the neighborhood of their father. Levi Wardruw, :i 
son of .Samuel, and grandson of William Wardrow, is now living 
on the homestead of his father, adjoining that of his grandfather ; 
he lives within six or seven rods of the spot where he was born 
seventy years ago, and has never seen a rive,r nor a steam-boat, 
and yet only a short distance from the Ohio River where passing 
steamers can be seen at almost any hour of the day. The family 
of Samuel Wardrow, consisting of four boys and three girls, re- 
mained at home for quite a while after maturity, It is said that 
they had a pair of "steelyards" in the possession of the family 
capable of drawing 200 pounds, and yet they would only weigh 
one member of the family. 

The second settler in the township was Vinson Calvin from Ken- 
tucky, who came to the township in the year 1S07, ami settled on 
the land now owned by Joseph MeFadden and George Nelson ; 
these were followed by a number of persons, such as the Petlijohns, 
David Graham, John Moore, Joseph Bratton. M oore was a na- 
tive of New Jersey. The Grahams aud Pettijohus were Virgin- 
inns, Sardinia was laid out April 1st, 1833, by Josiah Moore and 
William Lilly. During the summer following there were three 
buildings erected by the following persons, viz, Josiah Moure, 
Isaac M. Beck, and William Mills. Moore's house was the first 
one framed, but Beck's first completed. During the next year 
(1834) John Mahaw built the residence where Dr. Reek now lives. 
Stout D. Kenyan nud John L. Pangburn also built during this 
year. Lilly and Moore had a small store when the town was laid 
out, which they continued for a number of years. 

John L. Pangburn erected a carding machine and oil mill in 
1833. Hubert Burke started a cabinet shop in 1835. About the 
same time Willis Gilliland engaged in blacksmithing, and S. D>. 
Rurnyan in wagon-making. Dr. Isaac Beck came here soon after 
the laying out of the town from the adjoining neighborhood, and 
continued the practice of his profession already eommeneed. In 
1835 he removed to Bethel, Clermont County, and from there to 
Indiana, and returned to Sardinia in 1837. The second addition 
was made to the town during this interval. The first church of 
the township was built by the Presbyterians in 1829, on the site 
of the cemetery, northeast of town. The second was the M. E. 
church, built in 1840, and was known as the " Mt. Cannel" 
Church, built on the land now owned by Sarah Bell; they had 
services, however, in the neighborhood for many years previous 
to the erection of this church. 

The Presbyterian Church was organized by John Boyd. In 
1840 the Baptists built a church in Sardinia — a society having 
been organised by John Stearns. This organization, however, 
only existed for a period of four or five years, when the church 
building was sold for school purposes. In 1846 the Presbyterian 
church was removed and rebuilt in Sardinia. In 1800 or 1861 
the M. E. church at Mt. Carmel was abandoned, and*& new 
church built in the village also. Sardinia now contains three 
stores, three millinery stores, one carriage shop, two blacksmith 
shops, two shoe shops, one chair splint factory, one tin shop, two 
physicians, one drug store, two churches, one school, and a popu- 
lation of two hundred. Major Melntire is the oldest business 
man of the town, having been engaged in the mercantile business 
for a number of years. The town has communication by mail 
with Williamsburg, Clermont County, and was known in times of 
slavery as a celebrated depot on the "Underground Railroad." 

Riehard Pettijohn and Robert Hamilton were the first justices 
of the peace in the township. The oldest persons now living in 
the township are Mrs. Hall aged eighty-four, Mrs. Wright,^ighty, 
and Jacob Lout aged seveuty-five years. The township contains 
eight school districts, with an enumeration of three hundred and 
fifty-seven children between the ages of six and tweuly-one years; 
has a voting population of one hundred and fifty, aud a taxable 
valuation of $338,027- 

EAGLE TOWNSHIP. 

This is one of the original townships of Brown County, the 
east line of which forms part of the boundary line between Brown 
and Adams Counties. A part of it was stricken off on January 
20, 1823, and was organized into what is now known as Jackson 



26 



HISTORY OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO — Continued. 



Township. Robert Breckcnridge emigrated from Bourbon Coun- 
ty, Kentucky, in 1808, and settled in Eagle Township, Adams 
(now Brown) Comity, on the land now owned by James Wilson. 
He brought with him a family of thirteen children, only two of 
whom are now living in Brown County. Samuel, the second 
child, is now living on the old homestead, and is now in his 
seventy-seventh year. Robert Breckenridge's original purchase 
was one thousand acres of land in Rallies survey. Samuel 
Breekenridge had a family of nine children, only four of whom nre 
now living. John Alexander, a native of Augusta County, Vir- 
ginia, and a soldier of the Revolution, emigrated from Virginia 
to Eagle Township in the year 1811, and settled on the land now 
owned by his son, William Alexander, He brought with him a 
family of six children, four boys and two girls, viz., Francis, 
John, Andrew, and William, Elizabeth and Hannah, none of 
whom nre now living except William and Andrew. John Alex- 
ander, Sr., died March, 1832; his wife Jane died in 1837. Among 
the etirlv settlers of the township, and previous to Alexander, were 
John Miller, Sr., and John Miller, Jr., Hugh Miller, James 
Cowen, Thomas Rhodes and father, Spencer Riekett, Adam 
Irwin, John Baker, Tom Murphy, Benjamin Murphy, Elijah 
Murphy, William Layeock, John Nelson, Jonas Sams, Stephen 
Davis and his brother Isaac, William Derning, James, Frank, and 
Michael Dnffey. Israel Bell came to the township in 1818; lie 
was also a soldier of the war of 1812; so also were John Scott, 
William Duffy, Hugh Miller, Robert Breekenridge, James Cowen, 
William Layeock, Meyer Sams, Elijah Murphy, and John Re- 
cords. 

James Kendle and his sons Aaron, Jnmes, Hosea, Samuel, Ben- 
jamin, Samuel Cross, Joseph Statler, Jeremiah Fenton, Sr., and 
Jeremiah Fenton, Jr., were also early settlers in the township. 
Robert Breekenridge built the first saw and grist mill on Brush 
Creek, built in the township. William Luycock was the first jus- 
tice of the peace in the township. The first church organized in 
the township was the M. E. Church, at Fincnstle, organized in 
the year 1889, by John Manker. The next church organized was 

the Christian Church, at Fincnstle, in 1840, by ■- McLain. 

There are two other churches in the township, viz., Disciples, or- 
ganized 1850, and the Reformed, organized in 1845. The colored 
people also have two organizations in the township, viz., one 
Baptist and one Methodist. 

In this township is located one of the settlements of colored 
peojile, who were originally the slaves in Virginia of Samuel Gist, 
of England, and who emancipated them in 1818, and located a 
part (three hundred and fifty) of them on a body of land in the 
west part of this township; the original survey was that of Cud- 
wukk-r D. Walluce; the land was purchased by the agent of 
Wickain and Page, executors of James Gist. These people were 
located here in 1820, and unfortunately the location was not a 
favorable one, the land being wet and of a poor quality, conse- 
quently their condition is not very prosperous. Fincnstle was laid 
out in 1835, by John Alexander, and named by Samuel Stivers 
after Fincnstle, Virginia. John Frierson was the first man of busi- 
ness in the village, who was engaged in merchandising. Dr. S. 
E. Carey was born in this township in 1820, and has long been 
distinguished as a man of enterprise, and successful in the practice 
of his profession. The village now contains three stores, three 
churches, post-office, one mill, one school. Israel Bell is the old- 
est man in the township, he being eighty-nine years of age. There 
nre eight schools in the township, and four hundred and sixty-one 
school children. A voting population of two hundred and two, 
and a taxable valuation of $329,117. 

JACKSON TOWNSHIP. 

Jackson Township was originally a part of Eagle, from which 
it was separated by an act or the county commissioners, June the 
20th, 1823. The first election for township officers was held at 
the house of Stephen Reynolds. The township was surveyed by 
James Pilsoi). Among the early settlers of the township were 
Samuel Evans, who located near the present village of Carlisle; 
William McColgin, Sylv'nnus Parker, Joseph Reynolds, John 
Anderson, Thomas Brady, old Mr. OJendenin, William McNown, 
Thomas Rickey, Samuel Benington, Jacob Middlesworth, John 
and James Nelson, James Wright, Josiah Rhoton, the majority 
of whom were from the State of Virginia. Joseph Reynolds was 
an Eastern man, and was known in his vicinity as a " Yankee." 
He being the first settler in his immediate neighborhood, the 
settlement was in consequence called the "Yankee settlement." 
The first church in the township was a log church built in the 
year 1825. This same building is still standing on the land of 
Syl vanus P. Evans. Samuel Evans built the first saw-mill, on I 
Eagle Creek, built in the township. Stephen Reynolds is sup- 
posed to have been the first justice of the pence. 

The village of Carlisle was laid out in the year 1S34 by John 
Anderson. It is now a village of 75 inhabitants, and contains 
three stores, two blacksmith shops, two milliner shops, and one 
church. The township contains four churches, viz. : two Metho- 
dist Episcopal, one New Light, and one Christian Union ; one I. 
O. O. F., and one organization of the "Patrons of Husbandry." 
The number of schools is six, with an enumeration of 3S4 children, 
and, according to the last census, has a voting population of 174, 
and a taxable valuation of $439,818. 

BYRD TOWNSHIP 

Is one of the original townships of Brown County, being one of 
the townships stricken from Adams County at the organization of 



Brown. Among the early settlers of this township were John 
Knox, Thomas Hatfield, on the farm now owned by his son David, 
John McLaughlin, Andrew Dragoo, Lawrence Ramey, George 
Fisher, John Wright, Nathaniel Beasley, Benjamin Sutton. 
Beasley was at one time county surveyor of Adams County, 
afterwards captain, and the general in the militia. Lawrence 
Ramey had a family of ten children, nine girls and one boy. His 
son (George) died in the army during the war of 1812. Thomas 
Moore is also an early settler in this township; he is said to 
have kept the first (log) tavern in the township, where the village 
of Decatur now stands. John Austin built the first mill in the 
township, on Eagle Creek, just below the junction of the east and 
west branches. The first school was taught in a log house near 
the present village of Decatur, by Thomas Harris. The same 
school was afterwards taught by Judge Livingston. Benjamin 
Sutton is said to have been the first justice of the peace in the 
township, which office he held for the period of twenty-five or 
thirty years. The following anecdote is said to have been fre- 
quently told by the '"Squire" on himself. Passing along the 
public highway, he by chance met the wife of one of his neighbors 
riding what might be considered rather an inferior horse, when 
the 'Squire took occasion to remark that she was riding a very 
poor horse. " Yes," she replied, " she would much prefer a jaek- 
'ass for that purpose, but as they had all been elected 'Squires, it 
was impossible to get one." 

Byrd Township is identified with the early religious history of 
Brown County. The first religion established in the township 
was that of the Shakers. This religion was preached here as 
early as 1814, their first services being held in groves or private 
houses. Afterwards a structure was erected in which they wor- 
shipped, which is described as being "a log pen" of but a few 
feet in height, and divided into two departments, in one of which 
the men, and in the other the women, worshipped, which building 
was afterwards converted into a building more suitable for worship. 
Their continuance as a religious body was, however, but for a short 
time, covering a period of only five or sis years, when most of 
them removed elsewhere. 

In the year 1810, a "Christian" church was organized at what 
is now known as " Liberty Chapel," by Archibald Alexander, 
but who constituted the membership of that church is not now 
known. Services were held either in the woods or at private 
houses until 1817, when the church became so much strengthened 
that the building of a house of worship was determined upon; 
accordingly a stone church was erected during that year, the 
dimensions of which being 44x34 feet, the wall 2 feet in thickness. 
The building committee consisted of David Devore, Jeptha 
Beasly, and Samuel Pickcrell. The masons who built the walls 
were Daniel Copple and Joseph Hughes. In consequence of the 
old church needing repairs, and change of location being desirable, 
a new church building was erected in 1S74 The dedication sermon 
was by J. S. West, December 13th, 1874, from the following 
words: "Wherefore, seeing we also are compassed about with so 
great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight and the 
sin thai doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the 
race set before us, ever looking to Jesus the author and finisher of 
our faith." The following have been the ministers of this church : 
Archibald Alexander, John Lougley, Jesse Holton, David Hatha- 
way, John Ross, John Rodgers, J. B. Lucas, John Young, David 
Thompson, B. F. Salee, W. D. Moore, and J. S. West. 

The township contains seven school districts, with an enume- 
ration of 454 children; a voting population of 230; and a tax- 
able valuation $545,113. 

FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP, 

This township was organized by an act of the county com- 
missioners, December the 2d, 1822, the first election being held at 
the house of Henry Dunn. Among the early settlers of this 
township were Philip Lindsay, from Pennsylvania, Thomas Lind- 
say, from Kentucky, Azil Lucas, Jacob Lucas, John Prickett, 
Benjamin Hayes, James and Henry Dunn, Isaac Washburn, 
Joseph Long, Hosea Boner, John Shofe, and John Browu. Those 
of the next date were foreigners, the first of whom was George 
Boyer, who settled on the land now owned by Levi Dunn, in the 
year 1825, and was the forerunner of the large and thrifty popu- 
lation of Germans thut now so largely predominates in the town- 
ship, the present population being at least two-thirds German. 
Uriah Springer and John Lindsay were the first justices of the 
peace in the township, each of whom held his office for the period 
of twenty-one years. 

Arnheim, a smull village in this township, was laid out December 
2d, 1837, and contains a church, school, three stores, several 
shops, etc. The churches of the township number in all five, viz.: 
one Catholic, one German Methodist, one Baptist, one Lutheran, 
and one Christian Union. The township also has seven schools, 
with an enumeration of 430 children ; a voting population of 215 ; 
and a taxable valuation of §351,428. 

PERRY TOWNSHIP. 

This township was organized at the first meeting of the county 
commissioners, April 15th, 1818. This township is well adapted 
to the raising of all kinds of grain; the soil is generally fertile, 
the land rolling, aud well drained by the " East Fork" of the 
Little Miami, which passes through the entire length of it. Solo- 
mon Claypool was among the first settlers of this township, and 
built the first eabiu on Solomon's Run. Nathan Bishop settled 



in this township in 1818; he buying a farm of HOi acres, and 
still owns the same farm at the present time. At the present 
time he is a resident (and mnyor) of the village of Fayelteville. 
It is said that he has collected more money for other people in 
Brown County than any man in the State, and can say that he 
has never taken one cent of any man's money wrongfully. 

Christopher, Day was born in Maryland, August 6th, 1788. 
In 1800 he moved with his father to Mason County, Kentucky, 
and settled three miles from Washington ; was married to Han- 
nah Dye, August 10th, 1807 ; moved to Ohio in 1808, and settled 
on Straight Creek, near the present site of Georgetown, aud 
moved from there to this township, and settled on the farm where 
he now lives in 1822. Hannah Day, his wife, died December 
31st, 1821. He was married the second time in ] 822, to Melinda 
Grove, who died March 17th, 1855. Benard Kelly was born in 
Ireland April 1st, 1798; moved to this country in 1S25; settled 
in Brown County 1832; died April 28th, 1875. His family con- 
sisted of six boys and two girls. Five boys and two girls are 
still living. Mrs. Kelly was born in Ireland 1803; came to this 
country in 1825; was married in Cincinnati 1828. She resides 
on the old homesteud at the present time, with one son and two 
daughters. 

John B. Stump was born in Loudon County, Va., 1798. In 
1800 his father, Joseph Stump, left Virginia for what they called 
" The Western Country." After travelling through a portion of 
Ohio, they settled in Bourbon County, Kentucky, on Kennedy's 
Creek, near Paris. After remaining in Kentucky about three 
years, he moved back to Hampshire County, Va., where he re- 
sided until his death. About 1827 John B. Stump settled in 
this county, on the farm where he now resides; went back to 
Virginia in 1830, where he married Miss Margaret Moreland, on 
the 21st of January, 1830, after which he returned to Ohio and 
settled for life. 

FAYETTEVILLE 

Is situated on the "East Fork" of the Little Miami River, 38 
miles from Cincinnati, and 12 miles from the Little Miami R. R. 
The village contains several stores, one hotel, five flouring mills, 
one public school, post-office, one Catholic church, severul shops, 
etc., and has a population of about 400 inhabitants. Has a daily 
communication with Cincinnati via Millord and Little Miami 
R. R. 

St. Patrick's Academy. — This institution is conducted by the 
"Sisters of Charity," of Cedar Grove, near Cincinnati. The 
school is in a flourishing condition, the terms are exceedingly 
moderate. Board and tuition, including bedding, washing, mend- 
ing, per session of ten months, $125. 

ST. MARTIN'S 

Is situated in the north part of the township, five miles from 
Westboro, on the Cincinnati and Hillsboro R. R., with which it 
has daily communication by omnibus. The village contains a 
church, school, post-office, store, shops, etc. 

EERRISTOWN. 

When Williams and Ferris began their business of manufac- 
turing hames, lumber, etc., at the above-named place, October, 
1866, there were not to exceed 35 or 40 acres of cleared land on 
the entire tract of over 1100 acres. At this time, Nov. 1875, there 
are more than 500 aercs under cultivation. Since 1866 they have 
shipped more than one million feet of lumber, twelve thousand 
cords of wood, one hundred thousand bushels of charcoal, ten 
thousand dozen pairs of hames, which have found a market in 
nearly every State and territory in the United States, Cuba, Mexico, 
and Canada. 

Ursuline Convent is situated in Brown County, 45 miles east 
of Cincinnati, and five miles and a quarter from Westboro. 
Railroad trains run as far as Westboro, connecting with an effi- 
cient omnibus line which conveys passengers over a fine turnpike, 
to the commodious hotel in the adjacent village of St. Martin's. 

This institution was fonnded in the year 1845, by Mother Julia 
Chatficld, of the Ursuline Convent, Bologne-sur-mer, France, 
some sisters from her own convent and that of the Ursulines of 
Beaulien, France. On arriving in Cincinnati, this farm and beau- 
tiful woodland adjoining, in all three hundred and twelve acres, 
previously the site of a theological seminary, donated by Gen. 
Lyttle, was given by the most Rev. Archbishop J. B. Purcell, 
D.D., to the Ursulines, for educational purposes. Accordingly 
measures were taken by the Rev. Claude Gacon and Rev. William 
Cheyniel, of Riom, France (who had settled in Brown County in 
1839), for erecting a spacious building, which was opened for use 
in 1849. 

Again in I860 and '67 additions were made under the im- 
mediate supervision of the foundress, Mother Julia Chatfield, who 
presided over the community for twenty-nine years, and to whose 
prudence and wisdom is owing the present flourishing condition 
of this popular institution. 

St. Martin's Church was established in the year 1835 by 
Martin Kuendig, who is now a resident of the town of Milwaukee. 

The first building was constructed of logs partially hewed, 
which served the congregation until 1860, when it was taken 
down and rebuilt by a handsome brick building. 

St. Patrick's Church (Fayetteville) This church was or- 
ganized in the year 1S39, by the priest of St. Martin. During 



HISTORY OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO — Continued. 



29 



the same year the present brick building was erected. Father 
Butler (now deceased) was the first resident pastor of the con- 
gregation. He was succeeded in 1851 by Father Baily, who has 
been the pastor From that time since. 

Church of the Holy Ghost (Vera Cruz).— Organized by 
Father Stehle, from Cincinnati.- 

This township is settled with a large population of foreigners, 
the majority of whom are of French descent, who are generally 
industrious and money-making individuals. 

Perry township contains thirty-five thousand eight hundred 
and sixteen acres of land, which is valued at seven hundred and 
nineteen thousand seven hundred and sixty-four dollars, beside 
real estate in villages, valued at five thousand five hundred and 
six dollars, with chattel property to the amount of one hundred 
and forty-eight thousand and eleven dollars, making a total of 
eight hundred and eighty-two thousand nine hundred and eighty- 
one dollars. Number of school districts, fourteen. Number of 
school children, one thousand and thirty-seven. Toting popula- 
tion, four hundred and eight. 

UNION TOWNSHIP. 

The first settlement made in Brown County was made in this 
township in the year 1794, by Belshnzzer Dragoo. The Kinkead 
family were the next settlers in the township in 1796. Jeptha 
Bensley and Isaac Shepherd came into the township in 1798. 
Other early settlers were Dr. Campbell, Thomas Dickens, John 
and Anthony Dunhivy, John Laughlin, John Baird; Rev. James 
Gilliland, from South Carolina, located here in the year 1805. 
George Poage, Wm. Humphries, Nathaniel Collins, Matthew 
McClung, Andrew Carr, William Colter, and the Tweeds were 
among the early settlers of this township. 

The first mill built in the township was built by Samuel Waters 
on Straight creek. James Poage started the first carding ma- 
chine in the county. Thomas Cornack- was born in Nova Scotia, 
in the year 1754, and emigrated to Virginia at an early day. He 
served as a soldier during the war of the Revolution, emigrated 
to the State of Kentucky in the year 1793, and settled in the 
vicinity of Washington, where he remained a short time, remov- 
ing in 1797 to Brown County, and settled near the present town 
of Ripley. His family at that time consisted of ten children, onlv 
one (John Cornack, since deceased) of whom is now living, anil 
in his 86th year. When Cornack located here there were living 
in the vicinity two families, viz., William Long and James Prigett 
Long; he was among the first settlers on this side of the river, 
having settled here in 179G ; he was a native of Ireland. Alex- 
ander Dunlap was among the first settlers of this township, and 
also of the county. Dunlap was a native of Virginia, from whence 
he emigrated to Kentucky, and then to Ohio at an early day. 
Benjamin Evans, one of the pioneers of Brown County, emigrated 
frpm Pennsylvania in 1796, and built the first log cabin on the 
hill above Ripley, in the spring of 1797, on the farm now owned 
by Thomas Smith's heirs. In 1817 he settled upon the farm now 
owned by Isaac Porter, where he remained until his death, which 
occurred in 1848. He was much esteemed by all who knew him. 
He was a devoted Methodist, and one of the founders of the first 
organization in the county. 

Nicholas Devore was born in Germany, on the river Rhine. 
He was the son of a foundling ; the child being found in a furrow 
when plowing, from which circumstance the child was called 
" Devarro"— the furrow— hence the name, the English, French, 
and German, from which the word is derived, was in English cor- 
rupted and called Devore, meaning the place found. He was 
born the same year that Gen. Washington was, and with whom 
he served in the American Revolution, and in the Indian wars, in 
all seven years. Upon emigrating from the old world he settled 
in Washington County, Pennsylvania. In 17S7 he removed to 
Kentucky with a large family, his son David being at that time 
thirteen years of age. They einbarked'in a flat boat at Fort Pitt 
(now Pittsburg), and landed, after a tedious voyage, at Limestone 
(now Maysville), in Mason County, Kentucky, and settled four 
miles south of that place, near Washington, the first county seat 
of that county. Here they moved into a fort, or stockade, called 
"Kenton's Station." In 1796 David Devore married Alice Maun, 
and in 1800 emigrated to what is now Brown County, Ohio, and 
settled on Red Oak Creek, six miles north of the present town of 
Ripley. The spot where he located was in an unbroken forest. 
Here he constructed a rude cabin of logs, and began the tilling 
of the soil. He afterward, in a few years, built a large double 
log house, which served at times as a meeting-house; there being 
neither churches nor schools at that day. 

Dr. Alexander Campbell was born in Virginia in the year 
1779. From there he emigrated with his parents to east Tennes- 
see, where they remained five or six years, when, in company with 
a number of others, they removed to Crab Orchard, Kentucky ; 
travelling the distance pf one hundred and seventy miles on horse- 
back. At Crab Orchard the Campbell family separated from the 
others, and proceeded to Morrison's Station, where they remained 
a few months, and then located about one mile from the station, 
building a log cabin, or block-house as it was then called. Here 
they cleared a few acres of land and planted it in com. In the 
month of August following, the father — Alexander, Sr. — started 
to go back to Tennessee on important business ; while on the way 
he was taken sick, and with much difficulty reached his destina- 
tion, where he died on the ninth day after leaving borne. His 
wife was now left a widow, in a land almost a wilderness, with a 



family of eight small children. Alexander, Jr., had not, to this 
time attended school, there being none. During the year follow- 
ing a school was established, to which lie was sent to study Dil- 
worth's spelling book. Soon after his mother purchased a small 
farm often acres in Woodford County, and removed to it. Dur- 
ing the winter her children were sent to school, and as soon as 
spring approached they resumed the cultivation of the land. 
About this time a school in which Greek and Latin were taught 
was established at Pisgah meeting-house, about two miles distant. 
Alexander urgently solicited his mother to permit him to attend 
it, but in her embarrassed circumstances she could not well dis- 
pense with his services on the farm, and at the same time defray 
his expenses. He agreed with her to work of mornings and even- 
ings to pay his board, and also to refund to his brothers and 
sisters the amount of his tuition. From school he went to Lex- 
ington and commenced the study of medicine under Drs. liidgely 
and Brown, where he applied himself for two years. In 1801 he 
located in Cynthiana, Ky., and began the practice of his profes- 
sion, and was here married to Nnney, daughter of Col. Alexander 
Dunlap. He became a candidate, and was elected to the State 
legislature in the fall of the same year. In 1804 he removed to 
Ohio, and settled in Adams (now Brown) County. Iu 1807 he 
was elected a representative to the State legislature, was returned 
the next session, and elected speaker of the house of representa- 
tives. In 1809' he was again returned, and again elected speaker, 
and was soon after elected to the V. S. Senate. Ho was opposed 
to the war with Great Britain in 1S12, and voted against renew- 
ing the charter of the 0. S. Bank. He returned home and re- 
sumed the practice of medicine, and also became engaged in the 
mercantile business. He was subsequently several times elected 
to the legislature, and served in both the house of representatives 
and senate. 'Tis said that he was in Washington and witnessed 
the trial of Robert Fulton's model steamboat. 

He died in the town of Ripley on the 5th of December, 1857. 

Robert Conn was born in Ireland, in the year 1790, and came 
to this country in 1809, locating in Manchester, Adams County. 
"Billie" Russell, then iu Congress, came to him to vote in refer- 
ence to a division of Adams County, this county (Brown) then 
being a portion of Adams. In 1817 he voted for the division of 
Adams County. My first trip was at the general call in 1813. In 
1814 a battalion of "light-horse," from Ohio and Kentucky, left 
for Canada, under the command of Gen. McArthur; we crossed 
into Canada at the head of Lake Erie; passed on up through 
Canada, until we came to Grand River at a point where a bridge 
had been burned. On the opposite side of the stream was a fort, 
from which our advance received a volley. We then formed in 
line of battle, and Gen. McArthnr asked if he might be allowed 
to choose his own State troops, to take the advance, at which the 
cry went up that we would all follow where Gen. McArthur 
would lead. The command was then given to " charge bayonets.'' 
With a shout we sprang forward, and after a short struggle, the 
enemy surrendered the fort and 500 prisoners, After the fight 
Gen. McArthur formed us in a " hollow squnre" and complimented 
us by saying, "By my soul you are the finest lot of men I ever 
saw," and that we were " neither afraid of death nor the British 
troops." After this campaign Mr. Conn returned home and en- 
gaged in stilling on the same property which he now owns. In 
'1818 he was married and built the house in which he now lives, 
and in which he has lived for GO years. Ripley is now built on 
our old training ground, which was known as the weediest place 
in Brown County. 

In Ireland at the time of the Wesleyan revival, Mr. Stuard was 
the father, of our Vicarage for the Church of Englund. It hap- 
pened about this time that an " old herdsman" was severely gored 
by an animal of his herd, and my grandfather was sent for Stuard 
to come and pray with the unfortunate man. The wounded man 
had wine and cordial given him, and by these means was kept 
alive for some twelve hours, at which time Stuard came — when 
asked if he could do anything for the dying man, he replied : 
" That he had looked over all of his prayers, but had found none 
for a man gored by a bull." 

RIPLEY 

Was laid out about the period of the war of 1812, by Col. James 
Poage, of Virginia, and was first called Staunton, from Staunton, 
Va. The name was afterward changed to Kipley in honor of 
Gen. Kipley, a distinguished officer in the war of 1812. The 
town is located on the Ohio River, about 50 miles from Cincin- 
nati. Just back of the town is a range of high hills, from which a 
very extensive prospect of the surrounding country can be had. 
From it a view of the town, Ohio River, and a portion of Ken- 
tucky can be seen. Among the early business men of Ripley was 
Thomas Myers, who is said to have been the first man engaged iu 
merchandising iu the village. Mr. Myers was followed by William 
Humphries and Dr. Campbell in the same business. George 
Poage, John Evans, and Joseph N. Campbell were also among 
the early business men of Ripley. Thomas Hopkins was also a 
prominent man in the building of the town. The county seat 
was located here in the latter part of the year 1818. The first 
term of court in the village was held at the house of Alexander 
Campbell. Ripley contains at the present time ten churches, viz., 
one Methodist Episcopal, Presbyterian, Baptist, Christian, New- 
Light, Lutheran, Catholic; colored churches, Methodist, Wesleyan 
Methodist, and Baptist. The town contains eight drygoods stores, 
fifteen groceries, two drug stores, three bakeries, three millinery 
stores, two hardware and three stove stores, two book stores, three 



clothing stores, two hot stores, five boot and shoe stores, three 
jewellers, four merchant tailors, one newspaper, telegraph, and ex- 
press oBices, three livery stables, three holds, one Souring mill, 
saw and planing mill, one foundry, threshing machine works, 
one pinno fnetory, six tobacco warehouses, three pork houses, one 
tannery, three banks, building and loan association, Masonic, 
I. O. O. P., and Good Templar lodges, and nn organization of 
the A. O. TJ. W., one establishment for the manufacture of un- 
fcrmented wine, two breweries, one carriage and wagon shop, 
three coal yards, one graded and one Cnthoiic school, seven law- 
yers, seven physicians, two dentists, and a population of 3500 
Ripley hns daily communication with Cincinnati, Georgetown, 
Russelville, Hillsboro, and other points. The manufacture of 
pianos at Ripley has grown into a notable industry, and one of 
special interest to the West Sinco its establishment five years 
ago. the Ohio Valley Piano Company has turned ont upwards- of 
eighteen hundred finished pianos, and will this year make live 
hundred. About one hundred men are employed, and every part 
of the piano is made iu the factory. In labor saving machinery, 
in organization of the works and facilities for its production, in 
the general intelligence and knowledge or the workmen, and in 
quality of the work produced, this establishment ranks favorably 
with the best eastern manufactories, while iu economy, in cost of 
material and production, it has advantages not enjoyed iu the Enst. 



Nathaniel Collins, 
Arch. Liggett, 
Ceo. W. King, 
S. S. Campbell, 
John Caddis, 
Alex. Campbell, Sr. 
Silas Palmer, 
C. F. Campbell, 
Johu Qaddis, 
Samuel Glaze, 
O. P. Shaw, 
C. Baird, 
A. P. Lewis, 



MAYORS OP RIPLEY, 

1826-1329. 



182 



-!»:»' 



1830- 1831. 

1831- 1833. 
1833-1338. 
l83Brl840. 
1840-1842. 

1842- 1843, 

1843- 1844. 

1844- 1848. 

1848- 1843. 

1849- 1851, 
1851-1852. 



C. Baird, 
It. N. Jeuhjns; 
M. M. Murphy, 
David Saddle, 
C. P. Ciunpbetl, 
David Qaddis, 
Jesse M. Hell, 
J. P. Johnson. 



1852-1854. 
1864-1860. 
18150-186 1. 
1861-1863. 

1863- 1864. 

1864- 1863. 

1865- 18116. 

1866- 1867, 

1867- 1868. 



Daniel liiublis, 
J. MoOague, 

A. G. Collins, • 1870-1872. 
M. M. Murphy, 1872-1874 
W. H.Sly, 1874-1876. 

Presbyterian Churoh (Ripley) This church wns organized 

in the spring of the year 1811! by the Presbytery of Chillicotho. 

The original members, twenty-four in number, were all con- 
nected with the church at Red Oak, except two, viz., Dr. and 
Mrs. Adam Wylie, who had certificates in transfer from a church 
in Pennsylvania, During the two yenrs succeeding its organiza- 
tion, the services of the church wore held iu private houses gene- 
rully, and sometimes iu the school-house. Arrangements were 
made for the building of a church in 1817, and a lot was donated 
by James Poage for that purpose. A brick house 45x45 feet 
was erected which was used until 1854, when another was erected 
and used until 1S67, when it was sold ami a new building erected, 
1868. Rev. James Ross was the first regular preacher for the 
Presbyterian congregation iu Kipley, commencing his labors in 
1818, and continuing three years, leaving in 1831. In 1823 Rev. 
John Rankin was installed pastor. For twenty-three yenrs he 
labored very zealously, and became known throughout the county 
as nn earnest nnti-slnvery mini, and among the foremost in the 
temperance cause. In 1S36 Mr. Rankin accepted the agency of 
the American Anti-Slavery Society for one year, during which 
time his place was supplied by Rev. JauicB Dunlap. In 1838 a 
division in the general assembly took place ; this church decided 
to adhere to the new school branch connected with the Cincinnati 
Presbytery. After a few years Rankin returned ant} was given 
permission by the Presbytery lo dissolve the puxlorul relation. 

In 1845 he organized another church to which he ministered 
until the reunion of the churches in 1865. 

Christian Cimneii — Iu 1842 an effort was made to organize 
a society. During the summer Rev. Mr. Baker, by invitation, 
preached occasionally. After one year tho congregation fitted 
up the second story of the warehouse belonging to a member of 
the church. Tho membership continued to increase until ] 845, 
when it numbered one hundred and seventy. During the venr 
1846, a church building was erected at a cost of $7000. 

The membership at the present time amounts to about one 
hundred. 

^ Disciples Church —About the first of January, 1863, J. Z. 
Tuylor, by invitation of J. P. Dougherty, began n scries of meet- 
ings in the old Christinn meeting-liouse in the town of Ripley, 
Alter some days of co-operation it was proposed to unite the frag- 
ments of the two people, which proved a failure. A few persons 
then resolved to form themselves into a church, which they did 
near the middle of January, 1863, and employed J. Z. Taylor to 
preach for them. 

During the Drst year the society occupied the old Christian 
church, and the second year they occupied Liggett Chupel. At 
the close of the second year it was ascertained that they were not 
able to pay rent for a building in addition to paying a minister; 
consequently the meetings ceased for want of some piace in which 
to worship. 

The society remained in a dormant state mitil the spring of 1867, 
when they purchased the Presbyterian church for the sum of four 
thousand dollurs, when the regular meetings were resumed and 
have continued to the present time. 

M. E. Church (Ripley).— This church stands intimately con- 
nected with the pioneer operations of the county. The Brush 
Creek circuit was organized early in 1811, and its third quarterly 
meeting was held at Eagle Creek camp ground. The next wns 
held at Alexander Mehaffey's house on Eagle Creek, Sept. 12, 



32 



HISTORY OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO— Continued. 



1812, Solomon Langdon, P. E., and Isaac Pavey preacher in 
charm of the circait. At Eagle Creek enmp ground, Aug. 9, 

1813. the following entry was made on the records of the quarterly 
conference: — 0 

"Henry Bascom is recommended to the annual conference for 
n circuit to hare and preach ; obtained it 

(Signed) ROBERT FINLE*, 

% 0 President pro Urn." 

Thus emerged from our very midst that matchless orator whose 
fame has filled the world, and of whom Henry Clay when urging 
his appointment as chaplain to Congress, for which the noblest 
names of nearly all the churches were placed before Congress, and 
competition ran higher than ever before or since, Mr. Clay, rising 
to his fall height, as an udvocale, said: "Why, Mr. Speaker, 
Henry Bascom will preach you all to hell, and half way back 
again, while the oilier aspirants are gelling ready." Bascom was 
promptly elected chaplain to Congress over all opposition, and 
thus from Eagle Creek we sent to the highest crag of the rock of 
our nationul glory the orator of Brown County, who was amongst 
preachers as the eagle amongst birds. In 1816 Brush Creek cir- 
cuit embraced Brown mid three or lour other counties, numbering 
thirty societies, fifteen local, beside the regular itinerant preach- 
ers. ' In 1812, Rev. Isaac Parry formed the class lit Fitch's, and 
Bishop Bascom appointed class leader at the age of sixteen. The 
following names appear on the records of the beginning of Metho- 
dism in this vicinity in 1812: H. B. Iiascoin, Alpheus Bascom, 
Hannah Bascom, Airs. Parent, Hugh Allen, Mrs. Brown, Mrs. 
Staten, Henry Hurdesty, Henry Morris, George Contes. 

The first Methodist sermon was preached by Rev. John Collins, 
at the first burial among the villagers of Staunton— it being iho 
wife of Barnard Jackson. This branch of the church was early 
organized in Ripley. A class of a few members was formed at 
the residence of Samuel Fitch, on Eagle Creek, in 1812. In 1818, 
Rev. John Guddis was appointed class lender ill Ripley, by Rev 
William Dixon in charge of an adjoining circuit. The names of 
the principal members were John Ashbuugh, Sophia Ashtanga, 
Ann and William Tupnian, Rachel, Sophia, uud Anna Hardin, 
Mr. and Mrs. McDauiel, William Creekbaum, and John Cuuff- 
mn. The house of John Rhodes was the place of preaching, 
and afterwards ullcrnutely the houses of Aslibaugh, Hardin, and 
Jackson. 

LEVANNA. 

John Ligget was the first man to make any improvement on 
the present site of Levanna, he making the first clearing, and built 
a log cabin in 1799. Tlioinas Cornack, Alexander Martin, and 
Henry Topper were also early scalers in this vicinity. George 
and Christian Suullz were the first men of business in the village ; 
they being engaged in merchandising. These were succeeded by 
Butt aud Shulu, who operated for a short lime, when the name 
of the firm was changed to that of Wuters, Butl, Si Co. Waters 
also kept the first ferry in the county nt this point. These men 
were engaged in business here as early us 1810. Following these 
were Myers and Evans, merchants, who are suid to have nccuinu- 
luted considerable property while engaged in business here. Evans 
subsequently removed to Ripley, and Myers to Augusta, Ky. 

The first school was taught here in a log cabin on the land of 
Mnlhew Davidson (now owned by John Pnngljurn) during the 
latter pnrt of the year 1800, by Henry Miller. 

In 1820, the first newspaper (the Benefactor) published in the 
county, was published at this place by Louden, Butt, & Co. 
The paper was discontinued at the end of a year. 

In the year 1849, C. W. Boyd located here, and was engaged 
as clerk in the store of Samuel Horn. During the year previous 
(1848), Joseph Ramsey had built a saw-mill, the same being pur- 
chased by D. G. Stillmnn in consequence of the death of Ramsey. 
Stillman continued to operate until I ho year 1856, at which time 
he sold the mill to C. W. and S. G. Boyd, who continued the 
business until 1866, when they rebuilt the mill, adding also a 
pinning mill, increasing their business from ten to two hundred 
thousand dollars per annum. They now furnish employment for 
60 men. In 1873 a store was opened in connection with their 
lumber business. The cooper shop in connection with the plan- 
ing mill, manufactures between eight and nine thousand tobacco 
hogsheads annually. 

The village contains one graded school, nn organization of Good 
Templars, one adjunct church organization, distillery and grist 
mill, blacksmith shop, post office, has daily communication with 
Georgetown, Ripley, Cincinnati, and all points on the upper Ohio 
River. 

STEELING TOWNSHIP. 

This township is one of original surveyed townships of Brown 
County, and was laid off when the county was organized in 1817. 
The territory which now comprises the township of Green was a 
part of Sterling originally. The township borders on Clermont 
Ciunty. The East Fork of the Little Miami River passes along 
the northwest part of the township. John Anderson emigrated 
from New Jersey in the year 1798, to Hamilton County, Ohio, 
and settled on the Ohio River, near the mouth of the Little Miami. 
He came from New Jersey by land to Pittsburg, and from there 
by flat-boat to his place of settlement. In 1800 he removed to 
what is now Sterling Township, buying 121 acres of land lying 
on Todd's Run, the same being now owned by his sons, Thomus 
W. and Hirniu C. Anderson. Wm. Anderson had a family of 12 
children, three of whom are now living. He died on the 25th of 
June, 1838. Samuel Boyd from Ky. was also an early settler in 



two years and then settled in Brown Co., near the Eos Fork of 
rZitile Miami, on the farm ™»<£V« uSJESSS 
with r P b r.&° cf," ^Feh^ie, Smyrna, and in 
ISOS became a member of .he same church at W,l lamsburg ; h. 
was a member of that church 49 years. Died Oct. 19 1858. He 
raised a family of 4 sons and 2 daughters, only _two o whom are 
now living, viz., William and Archibald, Jr. Geo. Earhart from 
Penn Moses Leonard from N. Jersey, were 
John and Morris Trout, Absalom Day Andrew Shearer Major 
Thomas Ross, James and Charles Waits, Geo gc L v good 
Adam Snell, John Boyd, and Charles Waits were the fir t justices 
of the peace. The first church organization was e M L. 
Church it the house of Absnlon. Day in 1815. Burdsal I tapd 
(M. E.) was the first' church built in the township. lhcre are 
now 5 churches in this township, viz., 3 M. E. and 2 U. B 
Archibald McLain is perhaps the oldest justice of the peat 
the county, he being elected to the office in 1836, and has I he d 
the same (with the exception of two or three terms) up to the 
present lime; he being now in the 66th year of his age. V, m. 
McLain was the successor of John Boyd, he being one of the first 

j " ThTsurfac: oTIhe township is mostly leve.. The township con- 
tains one post office, viz., De-la-Polmn. 

It also contains 17,272 acres of land, valued at $293 582. 
Chattel properly to the value of $84,929 making a total of $378,- 
511. Has 8 school districts with an enrolment of 532 pupils, and 
a voting population of 221. 

GREEN TOWNSHIP. 

Originally a part of Sterling Township. Among the early 
settlers were Benjamin Leferry, John Ferrm, Charles Donliam, 
Joshua Archer, Joseph Keethler, Thomas Ross Joseph kretzer, 
Nicholas Smith, Robert Hicks, Thomas Shroef Adam Shroel, 
Enor. Krelzer, Henry Kretzer, Samuel Day. Benjamin Frazer 
came from Clermont County and settled on the land now owned 
by Ed. Bratton. George Leferry lived on the laud now owned 
by Brntlcn also; he and Frazer were brothers-in-law John 
Ferrin was formerly a resident of Pleasant Township; he lived 
on the land now in the name of Mrs. Jennings. Joshua Archer 
was a native of Kentucky, and was one of the earliest settlers in 
the township. Joseph Keethler was a native of Bourbon County, 
Ky. and settled in the township in 1810, on the land now owned 
by Levi Donhnm. Joseph Kretzer was from Pennsylvania. Adam 
Shroef from Kentucky. The first church organized in the town- 
ship was the M. E. Church at Benton, about the year 1825. 
Samuel Day, Nicholas Smith, Mrs. Kretzer, Thomas Ross, David 
Vandvke William Meeks, Nathan Rust, and John Thomas were 
among the members of said church. There are 6 churches now 
in the township, viz. : one M. E., one New Light, three Christian 
Union, and one Universalis!. James Gearing was the first justice 
of the peace in the township. The first school taught in the 
township wns by Thomas Ross near Benton, on the land of 
Samuel Kretzer. Mount Orab contains a church, one school, post 
office, three stores, several shops, mill, and about 100 inhabitants. 
The township has 16,486 acres of land, valued at $238,219, village 
property to the amount of $3066, chattels $79,595, total value 
8320,880. Eight school districts with an enumeration of 630 
pupils, and a voting population of 266. 

PERSONAL SKETCHES OF PROMINENT MEN. 

Learner B. Leeds wns born in Clermont County, O., July 20th, 
1816. His parents were of English and German descent. They 
emigrated from New Jersey in 1812 and settled in Clermont 
County, where they lived till their death. He was raised upon 
his father's farm until near eighteen years of age, when he was 
apprenticed to Snmuel Medway to learn printing ill the Ohio 
Sun ofiice, Butnvia. Afler serving out his apprenticeship, he 
worked as journeyman in the Cincinnati Gazette and Philanthro- 
pist oflices for several years. November, 1840, he purchased the 
Sun office in Batavia, and published and edited that paper 
(with an intermission of about two years) until 1864, when he 
sold out. He filled the office of county recorder for two terms 
of three years each. In 1864, Mr. Leeds bought the Arijns 
printing office in Georgetown, Brown County. O., and in 1865 
changed the name or the pnper to the " Brown County News," 
which paper lie still publishes 

In 1869, Mr. Leeds was elected to the State Seiiote for the 
district comprising the counties of Clermont and Brown. He was 
re-elected in 1871, serving four years in the Senate. As a mem- 
ber of the Senate he possesseil the confidence of all, nnd wielded 
a great influence in that body. He never addressed the Senate 
unless he had a meritorious proposition to advocate. His speeches 
were generally short, pithy, and to the point. As a democratic 
politician he was always earnest, conscientious, and deeply devoted 
to pnrty friends. Although he enjoyed the county patronage of 
Clermont and Brown for many years, he never amassed a fortune, 
nor even a competence. He perhaps did more gratuitous work 
for political friends than any man living. His generosity and 
liberality knew no bounds. In 1838 he mnrried a Miss Harriet 
Smith, by whom he had three children. In 1860 his wife died, 
and in 1865 he married a Miss Millspaugh, of Newtown, Ohio, 



who is yet living. Mr. Leeds has held many minor offices, 
such as town councilman, member of school boards, etc. He 
is one of the oldest newspaper men in the Slate. While an ap- 
prentice, he assisted in editing the 51m, writing o scries of articles 
on the subject of bonks ond banking, which were extensively copied 
into other Democratic popers of the State. But few men have 
performed more labor in the printing and publishing business than 

°DAV4» Tarbeli. was born nt Ripley, Ohio, Dec. 3, 1836, and 
began the study of the low at the age of seventeen, with Chambe rs 
Bnird and Wm. F. Wiley, prosecuting attorney, and was admitted 
to the bar in Georgetown, 0„ in 1868. He begun the practice ot 
law at Ripley, afterward following the profession at Aberdeen, 
and thence to Georgetown, in April, 1864. He was appointed 
prosecuting attorney for Brown County, by Judge Asn- 
bnrn, in 1862, and was elected probate judge of Brown County 
in 1864 to fill a vacancy caused by the death of Judgo Charles 
F Campbell. Was re-elected to the same office in 1866, and was 
elected judge of the Court of Common Pleas at a special election 
held in May, 1871, which position he still retains. In 18(>8 lie 
was a delegate to the Notional Democratic convention which met 
at Tammany Hall, New York. A portrait of Judge larbell 
accompanies' this work, as will be seen by reference lo page 5. 

Enoch E. Ronev, County Auditor, was bom in Clark 1 own- 
ship, Brown County, Ohio, on Oct. 3, 1845. His father died 
when he was only two years of age; bis mother being very poor, 
he was bound out to strangers when but three years old Mr. 
Roney never became disconraged because his lot wns a hard one, 
but was always ready to do his duty, to vindicate the right nnd 
expose the wrong. When the war broke out tn 1861 Mr. Roney 
was but fifteen years of age, but he had such a love for his country 
and respect for his flag, that he volunteered on August 13, 1861, 
in company K, 27th regiment O. V. I., and during the war was 
wounded three times— at New Madrid, Mo., March 13, 1862 ; 
Corinth, Miss., October 4, 1862, and at Atlanta, Ga., July 22, 
1864. One has only to read the history of that regiment to leorn 
how those brave boys defended their country and flag. At the 
close of the war Mr. Roney came home and finished his education ; 
bis health being such that he bud to follow some light profession 
that his health would permit of. Mr. Roney was admitted to the 
bar as an attorney-at-law for the different courts of Ohio on the 
24th day of September, 1870, and to the United States courts on 
the 20th day of October, 1875. He was elected auditor of Brown 
County, Ohio, October 13, 1875. 

John Lafabre was born in Franklin township. Brown County, 
Ohio, September 9, 1830. In 1850 he went to Wittenberg Col- 
lege, Springfield, Ohio, where be remained one year. Graduated 
at Farmers' College near Cincinnati, ill 1853, then studied law 
with Gunkle and Strong nt Dayton, Ohio. He graduated at the 
Cincinnati Law School in 1855, since which time he has spent 
the greater portion of his time at farming nnd the practice of law 
in Russellville, Brown County, Ohio. In 1875 be wns elected 
clerk of the Court of Common Pleas in Brown County. 

John T. Beady wns born in Jackson township, Brown County, 
Ohio, September 17, 1835. He is a practical farmer, and has 
constantly given bis attention to that brunch of industry until Oct. 
1874, except four years spent in the service and defence of the 
flag of his country. 

Mr. Brady was elected sheriff of Brown County in Oct. 1874, 
which office he now holds. Although a solid republican, yet he 
was elected by a handsome majority while the county is strongly 
democratic. 

George W. Drake wns born in Pleasant township, Brown 
County, Ohio, on the Stb of April, 1826, and has lived in the 
county ever since, and spent the principal part of his life in farm- 
ing until the time of his election to the office of county treasurer, 
which occurred on the second Tuesday of October, A. D. 1873. 
He was afterwards renominated by his party, and then unanimously 
nominated by the opposite party, and re-elected to the same office 
on the second Tuesday of October, 1875. 

Charles A. Linn, Jr., prosecuting attorney of Brown Counly, 
Ohio, was born at Otterberg, in Rhenish Bavaria, Germany, on 
the 31st day of August, 1848. Came to the United States with 
his parents in 1851, since which lime he has been living in Ripley 
and Cincinnati, Ohio. Obtained a thorough commercial nnd 
general education before taking up the study of the law in 1866. 
Ill 1867-8 graduated at the Cincinnati Law School, and wns ad- 
mitted to practice at Georgetown, Brown County, Ohio, in the 
spring of 1869. Studied luw two years with Chambers Buird and 
Wm. D. Young at Ripley, Ohio, and one year with Judge James 
Sloan, at Cincinnati, Ohio. x Practised law with General Thomas 
Powell and Judge T. O'Connor one year at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

W. W. Ellsberry, M.D., was bom in Brown County, Ohio, 
December 18th, 1832. At the age of eighteen he commenced 
the study of medicine with his father, Dr. E. M. Ellsberry. He 
attended his first course of lectures nt " Starling Medical Col- 
lege," and graduated afterwards at the Cincinnati College of 
Medicine. For eleven years he devoted his time exclusively to 
the practice of medicine, when he was elected county auditor, to 
which office he aspired on account of ill health. He served ns 
auditor six years and eight months, during which time a portion 
of his time hns been devoted to the study and practice of his pro- 
fession. He was one of the originators of the " Brown County 
Academy of Medicine," of which he has been secretary since its 
origin, and one of its active members. He is also a member of 
the Ohio, aud Americun Medical Associations. 

The doctor has always been radically democratic. 



35 

1369419 

LIST OF PATRONS FOE THE ATLAS OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO. 



BYRD TOWNSHIP. 



Abney, Allen 

Adamson, Q 

Adamson, W. J 

Baird, Wm. C 

Blaeke, S. L. B 

Baird, W. W 

Black, Lncretia 

Baird, Mrs. Sarah 

Baird, Geo. W 

Baird, Will. W 

Baird, Walter S: 

Carson, J. M 

Cluston, S. P 

Davidson, E. M 

Dragoo, Daniel 

Ellison, A, 

Edwards, W. H. H 

Edwards, J. B 

Fisher, Robt. I' 

Flaugher, S. C 

Oeeslin, Joseph 

Geeslin, Albert A 

Howland, J. R 

Henry, Jos 

Henry, John W 

Henry, Thomas C 

Hatfield, David 

Holton, N. L 

Hamilton, J. H 

Johnson, Wm F 

Kirkpatrick, A 

Kirkpatrick, Newton . . 

Kirkpatrick, C. B 

Kirkpatrick, Mrs. N. G. 

Liggett, A. P 

Moore, Mrs. M. A 

Moore, J. P 

McLaughlin, J. R 

Montgomery, J. C. ... 

MeFerson, Jas 

Melvin, H. E 

Melvin, Jus. W. P. 

Montgomery, Wm 

Marshall, J. C 

Martin, A. N 

MeFerson, A. H 

MeFerson, J. A 

Purdin, N. N 

Purdin, W. T 

Piekerill, S. W 

Pittenger, John 

Piekerill, Green N. ... 

Piekerill, John F 

Purdin, M. L 

Parry, Joseph 

Purdin, Geo. S 

Purdin, Mrs. I. E 

Piekerill, G. N., Sr.. . . 

Rickey, Wm 

Sanders, T. D 

Stevenson, Joseph .... 
Stevenson, Robert . . . 

Sheeler, Adam 

Stevenson, J. M 

Stevenson, A. T 

Shaw, J. M 

Thompson, R. T 

Thompson, A. P 

West, Mrs. Mary 

West, John, Sr 

Wills, Wm 

West, J. S 

West, Wm. B 

West, Mrs. Sarah Ann . 
Wil 

son, John W 

Weeks, John 

tallace, W 
allace, R. H 

Wallace, N. B, 

Wallace, John T 



165 
45 



300 
140 
122 
124:] 
100 
119} 
100 
50 



331 
120 
254 



118 
111) 

TGi 
100 

97 

25 



191 
73 
200 
100 
50 
67 
290 
147 



150 

lii 

140 
150 
114 
103 

42 
153 
151 
206 

63 
130 
125 

96 

73 
112 
134 



P. O. ADDRESS. 



132 
116 
200 



100 
107 
500 



104 
133 
174 



Red Oak . 
Decatur . . 
Ripley ... 
Deealur . . 
Ripley . . . 
Decatur . . 
Russellville 

Decatur . . 



Ripley . . 
Decatnr 
Red Oak 



Decatnr . . 
Red Oak . . 
Decatur . . 
Russellville 
Decatur . . 



Red Oak 
Decatur . 



Russellville 
Red Oak . 



Red Oak 
Decatur . 



Red Oak 
Decatur . 



Russellville 
Red Oak . 
Decatur . . 



OCCUPATION. 



Conslable 
Physician . 
Farmer .. 



Miller iPr. Woollen Mills 



Fanner and Teacher 
Farmer 



Miller.. 
Farmer 



Farmer & Mechanic 
Farmer 



Druggist 
Prop'r Hotel , 
Farmer 



Blacksmith . 
Farmer . . . 



Minister 

Furmer & Co. Com 



South Carolina . 
Brown Co , O. . . 



Adams Co., O. . 
Brown Co., O. 



Adams Co., O. . . . 

Brown Co. O. . . . 

Co. Down, Ireland 
Brown Co., O 

Essex Co., Va. 
Brown Co. O 



Adams Co., O. 
Brown Co , O.. 



Adams Co., O. 
Pennsylvania . . 
Brown Co., O . 
Pennsylvania . . 
Adaias Co., O. 

Brown Co., O. 



Kentncky 

Brown Co., O. . 



Kentucky .... 
Brown Co., O. 

Adams Co., O. 
Brown Co., O. 



Delaware 
Brown Co., O. 
Adams Co., O 
Brown Co., O. 



New Jersey . . . 
Mason Co., Ky. 
Brown Co., O. . 



1X30 
1828 
1830 
1823 
1840 
1827 
1842 
1845 
1831 
1853 
1853 
184G 
1856 
1842 
1836 
1818 
1840 
1839 
1S52 
1851 
1853 
1851 
1818 

1820 
1833 
1805 
1833 
1838 
1852 
1820 
1833 
1831 
1825 
1841 
1845 
1869 
1831 
1810 
1815 
1837 
1841 
1836 
1836 
1825 
1834 
1838 
1810 
1845 
1842 
1829 
1845 
1842 
1818 
1870 
1838 



1836 
1853 
1816 
1832 
1851 
1855 
1855 
1845 
1850 
1845 
1844 
1798 
1837 
1825 
1820 
1817 
1827 
1837 
1816 
1847 
1839 
1830 



CLARK TOWNSHIP. 



Burris, S 

Barnes, R. A. . . . 

Bowers, J 

Chatterton, Jas. . 
Camery, W. II. . . 
Chapman, John . . 

Early, John 

Elliott, J. W 

Fithen, Daniel . . . 

Hiler, John 

Livingston, II. W. 
Livingston, J. B. 
Liming, Jasper . . 
Nenl, Butler .... 
Neal, Randolph . 
Ogden, Alfred, Jr. 
Prnthcr, J. B. . . . 
Powell, Adam . . . 
Richard, J. P. . . . 
Ralston, P. P.. . . 
Salisbury, J. S. . . 
Thompson, J. L. 
Thompson, W. G. 
Tatman, J. B. . . . 

West, Z 

Wood, George M 



P.O. ADDRESS. 



50 
250 
102 
14H 

3 
159 
131 

50 
102$ 
150" 
230 
19 Si 
110 
315 
200 
125} 

83 
206 
104 
150 
180| 

27} 
157J 
100 
186 
93 



OCCUPATION. 



Bethel 

Maple 

Hamersville . 



Bethel 

Hamersville . 



Georgetown . . 
Hamersville . . 



Bethel 

Hamersville . 



Georgetown . . 



Farmer . 

Plasterer 
Furmer 



Merchant . 
Farmer . . 



Jefferson Co., 0. . . . 


1S40 


Brawn Co., O 


1837 




1S50 


New York 


1852 


Clermont Co., O. . . . 


1800 


Kentncky 


1836 


Clermont Co., O. . . 


J 820 


Adams Co.,0 


1834 


Jefferson Co., O. . . . 


1S54 


Brown Co., O 


1850 


Pennsylvania 


1X54 


Columbiana Co , O. 


1854 


Brown Co., O 


1827 




1S55 



Kentucky 

Brown Co., O. 



1842 

Clermont Co., O. . . 1814 
Brown Co., 0 1834 



EAGLE TOWNSHIP. 



Abbott, G. W 

Albright, John 

Breckenridge, John C. . 

Burris, Jonathan 

Burris, William 

Carey, S. E 

Cecil, John 

Ervin, N. M 

Fenton, Harrison 

Hare, Ella M 

Hamilton, S. Y 

Ketterman, Moses R.. . 

Naylor, W. K 

Prickett, E. R. 

Records, T. H 

Skinner, A. R 

Swain, S. L 

Stevens, Daniel 

Vance, H. L 



9(ii 
100 
295 



104 

13* 



Scott. . . 
Fincastle 



Emerald . 
Fincastle 



SeottP.O.AdanwCo 

Fincastle . . 



Farmer 

Farmer and J. 1' 
Farmer 

Physician 

Blacksmith 

Farmer 

Teacher 

Farmer 



Fanner and J. P. 

Miller 

Farmer 



Brown Co., O. .... . 

Bavnria, Gcr 

Brown Co., O 

Bracken Co., Ky. . . 
Brown Co., O 

Harrison Co., O.. . . 
Brown Co., O 

Adams Co., O 

Brown Co., O 

Highland Co., O. . , 
Monroe Co., W. Ya 

Brown Co., O 

Madison Co., Va. . , 

liuLk-r Co., Pa 

Brown Co.. O 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 



Barns, C. E. . . 
Case, J. Glenn 
Dunn, Levi 
Hendrixson, Allen 
Inskeep, Job 
Inskeep, Edward 
List, Joseph . . . 
Myers, Wi 
Pindell, H. F. 

Reed, E. T 

Shotsman, Joseph 
Shotsmau, Reason 
Schweickart, Philip 

Wells, W. H 

Waters, Isaac 




Georgetown . 
Arnheim 



Georgetown . 
Russellville . 



Arnheim . , . 
Russellville 
Arnheim . . . 
Russellville 



Georgetown . 
Arnheim 



Miller 

School Teacher . 
Farmer 



Teacher 
Farmer 



Bonrbon Co., Ky. , 
Brown Co., O. . . . 



Alsace, Franco . . 
Brown Co., O.. . . 



Bavaria, Ger 

Brown Co., O. . . . 
Alsace, France . . 
Brown Co., O 



1845 
IS28 
1813 
1823 
1819 
1847 
1841 
1814 
1840 
1832 
1830 
1832 
1842 
1831 
1820 



38 



LIST OF PATRONS OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO— Continued. 



GREENE TOWNSHIP. 



Allison, J. C 

Bratleit, K 

Baldwin, J 

Barker, Ezra 

Beam, Alexander 

Beam, W. L 

Brown, S. R 

Brooks, A. J 

Collins, James 

Day, D. L 

Day, S. A 

Dav, G. W 

Day, H. W 

Davis & Sons, J. 0. . . 

Elliolt, J. F 

Enrhart & Bro., A. C. 

G ray, Lee 

Glover, J. C 

Hanna, K. D 

Henlion, J. M 

Hugl.es, James 

Hair, Washington. . . . 

Hill, G. C 

Jennings. Delile 

Kralzer, J \V 

Lancaster, John It. . . . 

McChesney, J. W 

Moon, Alva 

McMullen, J. C 

McMnllen, David 

Minick, George W. . . . 

Mann, John 

Stronp, Michael, M D. 

Smith, Nicholas 

Tissandier, B. A 

Vance, L. S 

Weeks, Samuel H 

Wallace, John 

Wallace, M. H 

Weber, W 

White, Win. W 

Walker, N. R 



14 
574 
110 

10 
118} 

40 
550 

'iii 

35 
S0i 
t5 



2J0 
"a 



Union Plains . 

Mt. Oral) 

Five Mile 



Buford . . . 
Union Plai 
Five Mile . 
Mt. Oral) 



Union Plains 
Five Mile .. 
Union Plains 
Jit. Oral)'... 
Union Plains 
Mt Orab . . . 



OCCUPATION. 



Proprietor Hotel. . . 
Farm. & Stock Deal 

Farmer 

Blacksmith & Farm. 
Ship Carpent. & Far. 
Farmer 



Photographer 
Machinist .... 
Fanner 



100 



50 
151i 

131 
223 
176 
83 
200 

103 



Buford . 
Five Milt 



Bnford . . . 
Five Mile 



Union Plains . 
Mt. Orab 



Union Plains . 
Mt. Orab.... 



Union Plai 
Five Mile . 



Farmer & Huckster, 

Farmer 

Black., Turner,* Former 

Machinist 

Prop, of S Sawmill. 
Prop, of Hotel. 
Farmer and Teacher 
Physician ...... 

Prop, of Sawmil 
Farmer ....... 

.Merchant 

Minister 

Farmer 



Teacher & Med Stu 

Prop. Suwmill 

Farmer 



Blacksmith & Farm. 

Farmer 

Farmer & Machinist 

Physician 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Grocer 

Merchant 

Farm. & Sorghum m. 

Farmer 

Fanner and Miller. . 

Miller 

Druggist 



Hamilton Co., O. . 
Highland Co., O. . 
Clermont Co., O. . 
Belmont Co , O. . . 
Beaver Co., Pa.. . . 
Cincinnati, O. . . . . 

Ireland 

Brown Co., O 

Alleghany Co., Pa. 
Brown Co., O. ... 

Clermont Co., O . 



Alleghany Co., Pa. 

Brown Co., O 

Clermont Co., O. . 

Adams Co., O. . . . 

Ireland 

Clermont Co., O. . 



Brown Co., O. . . 

Clermont Co., O. 
Clinton Co., O. . 
Brown Co., O. . . 
Warren Co., O. . 

England 

Highland Co., O 
Bracken Co., Ky 

France 

Brown Co., O.. . 



Hamilton Co , O. .. 
Huntingdon Co , Pa. 
Clermont Co., O. .. 



1852 
1856 
1866 
1863 
1865 
1866 
1868 

1867 
1844 
1842 
1836 
1836 
1865 
1867 
IS 17,' 10 
1847 
1851 
1875 
1866 
1S63 
1S36 
1856 
1846 
1841 
1855 
1851 
1847 
1845 
1833 
1873 
1S5S 
1856 
1804 
1872 
1846 
1842 
1811 
1848 
1844 
1855 
1811 



HUNTINGTON TOWNSHIP-Continued. 



HUNTINGTON TOWNSHIP. 



Atherton, Geo. G 172* 

Buchanan, John 216 

Buchanan, Thomas 323 

Brisbois, Joseph 75 * 

Bowman, Aaron 56g 

Bowman, B. D 75 

Brown, H. B 60 

Bradford, P. N 

Brookover, John j 479$ 

Beasley, Massie, Esq. 
Brookover, A- J. ... 
Brookover, Geo. W. . 
Brookover, Lewis P. 
Brookover, James. . . 
Carrigan, James, Jr. 
Carrigan, James, Sr. 

Cochran, James 

ClieeBman, J. W. . . . 
Covert, William .... 
Campbell, Shelby... 

Campbell, J. B 

Cooper, E. M 

Cooper, Jacob 

Cooper, Z. C 

Campbell, Robert. . . 

Cochran, John 

Cooper, Philip W. .. 

Daulton, EL P 

Dragoo, J. F 

Davis, Elijah 

Degman, P. N 45| 

Evans, Andrew 18' 

Evans, Samuel . . . 
Evans, G. M. D. . 
Evans. Laban . . . 



500 
138 

60 
306 

10 
124* 
124 

10 



131t} 
254^ 



Aberdeen . 
Ripley . . . 



Hiett . . . 
Ripley . . 

Aberdeen 
Hiett . . . 
Aberdeen 



Ripley . . 

Aberdeen 
Ripley . . 

Aberdeen 

Hiett ... 

Ripley . . 



Grocer 

Farmer 

Justice of the Peace 
Farmer 

Farmer & Carpenter 
Farmer 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Gardener 

Prop, of Sawmill . . 
Farmer 



Merchant . 
Farmer . . 

Blacksmith 
Merchant . 
Blacksmith 



Mason Co., Ky 
Scotland 

Germany 

Adams Co., O. 
Brown Co., O.. 

Adams Co., O. 
Brown Co.,0.. 



New York City . 
Brown Co.. O. . . 



Monmouth Co.,N. J 

Brown Co., O 

County Tyrone, Ire. 
Brown Co.. O 



Franklin Co., Ind. 
Mason Co., Ky. . . . 
Brown Co., O 



1831 
1849 
1849 
1854 
1851 
1*50 
1833 
1845 
1828 
1811 
1819 
1844 
1854 
1811 
1832 
1810 
1823 
1860 
1818 
1809 
1805 
1841 
1812 
1834 
1821 
1812 
1838 
1845 
1856 
1805 
1841) 
1809 
1834 
1845 
1847 



Evans, Will U 

Enis, George 

Fulton, T. B 

Fulton, William 

Fulton, Joseph 

Fl uuglier, E. M 

Flaugher, W. R 

Flaugher, W. J 

Flaugher, Tilford 

Guinea, W. B 

Griffith, Lennder 

Gilbert, Dyas 

Griffith, Owen 

Griffith, Harrison 

Griffith, John 

Griffith, A 

Glussco, T. H 

Games, John F., Sr 

Games, John F., Jr.". .. 

Games, David W 

Grierson, J. W 

Glasscock, J. R 

Gore, C. H 

Grierson, A. G 

Grimes, Eliza Ann .... 

Garrison, E 

Glierson, Alex 

Grierson, Miss M. C. . . 

Hawk, John F 

Hill, T. S 

Huttsell & Stewart 

Harover, William 

Howard, G. W 

Howard, D. B 

Hutchinson, Samuel 

Jones, T. F 

King, James 

Kerr, Joseph 

Lord, J 

Martin, Epliraim 

McKiuley, Jesse G 

Martin, Edmund 

McNulty, John 

McNulty, L. H 

Martin, William 

Marvin, T. L 

McQuilkin, W. R 

Moore, Thos. M 

Martin, Henry V 

Martin, J. H 

Martin, Thos. M 

Martin, Reuben 

Martin, Quiuey 

Martin, E. B 

Paul, James 

Purdon, Juhu P 

Porter, Elijah 

Power, B F 

Power, J. C 

Pim, Jacob 

Purdy, R. W 

Porter, A. H 

Pence, D. M 

Roush, Michael 

Riedle, Louis 

Reeder, Daniel B 

Regan, Thos. O 

Bhtflton, Wm. J 

Shelton, Wm 

Spears, Spencer 

Spears, F. M. & O. B. . . 

Spears, O. B 

Stout, Paten 

Scott, Jos. J 

Sharp, Thomas 

Shelton, A. M 

Stewart, Robert 

Stewart, J 

Thompson, John S 

Toler, J. M 

Thompson, C. G. & Bro. 

White, Geo. H 

Wallace, H. N 

Waldron, J. C 

Worstell, I. H 

Waldron, P. W 

Wilson, Henry F 

Young, Thomas 

Young, A. D 



91$ 
66 

115 

166 
703 
5H 
33j 

"§ 
201 

so* 

1H 

60 



200 
9H 



35 



207 
190 
124 
100 
135^ 

95 
200 

30 



101 
112 
224 
347 
121 

iiif 

1(52 



45 
138 

143 



P.O. ADDRESS. 



Hiett 

Aberdeen . 



Hiett . . . 
Ripley . . 
Aberdeen 
Ripley . . 



Hiett . . . 

Aberdeen 

Ripley .. 
Aberdeen 



Hiett 

Aberdeen . 



Hiett 

Ripley . . . 



Hiett 

Aberdeen . 



OCCUPATION. 



Physician & Surgeon 

Butcher 

Farmer 



Merchant . 
Furmer .. 
Surveyor . 
Farmer . . . 



Merchant . . 
Merchunts . 
Farmer . . . 
Shoemaker , 
Farmer . , . 



Ripley . . 
Aberdeen 
Ripley . . 

Hiett 

Ripley . . 
Decatur . 

Hiett ... 
Aberdeen 



Ripley . . . 
Aberdeen . 

Hiett 

Aberdeen . 

Ripley . . . 
Decatur . . 
Aberdeen 



Ripley 



Blacksmith 
Farmer .. 



Prop. Livery Siabh 

Merchant 

Fanner and M.D. . 
Farmer . . . / 



Brown Co., O. . . . 
Wnrtemberg, Ger. 
Mason Co., Ky.. . 

Brown Co 



Yorkshire, Eng. . . 
Fleming Co., Ky. . 
Frederick Co., Va. 
Adams Co., O. . , . 

Brown Co., O 

Mason Co., Ky 

Yorkshire, Eng. . . 



Brown Co., O 

Pickaway Co., O. 



Brown Co., O. . 



Clermont Co , O. 
Brown Co., O. . . . 



Athens Co., O. 
Brown Co., O. . 



Farmer & Minister 
Farmer 



Mariner 

Miller 

Physician & Surgeois 
Farmer 



Tanner 

Furmer & Tp. Clerk 
Furmer 



Merchant 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Pro. Hotel & Saloon 

Teachers 

Farmer 

J. P. & Ex M. Leg. 

Farmer 

Teacher and Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer and Miller . 
Miller 



Columbiana Co., O. 

Lawrence, Pa 

Brown Co., O 



Aberdeen, O. . . . 
Mason Co., Ky. . 
Chester Co., Pa. 
Highland Co., O 
Brown Co., O. . . 
Adams Co., O. . 

Bavaria, Ger. . . . 
Brown Co., O. . . 
Co. Limerick, Ire 
Brown Co., O. . . 
Mason Co., Ky. 
Fleming Co., Ky, 
Brown Co., O. . . 

Highland Co., 6 
Brown Co., O . . 
Fayette Co., Pa. 
Brown Co., O. . . 
Scotland 

Scotland 

Carter Co., Ky. . 
Brown Co., O.. . 

Adams Co., O.. . , 

West Va 

Brown Co., O 

Adams Co., O. '. '. 



LIST OF PATRONS OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO — Continued. 



41 



JACKSON TOWNSHIP. 



Bachman, V 

Campbell, William. . . 

Campbell, J. S 

Dixon, Samuel 

Eden field, R. H 

Edgington, A. L 

Eyler, J. W 

Evans, S. P 

Fenton, Samuel L. . . . 

Fulton, George 

Fenton, Turner 

Gwinner, Michael. . . . 

Henderson, A 

Inskeep, Fountain. . . . 

Jacobs, Francis 

Jacobs, Jefferson 

Kendall, Wm. C 

Kendall, Wilson 

Kleincknecht, Jacob. , 

Knott, Thomas 

McNown, S 

McNown, R. J 

McNown, William . . . 

Marshall, N 

Marshall, Wilson 

McManis, S 

McNown, Thomas C. 

Parry, N. B 

Potts, Mathew 

Rickey, Samuei 

Segondollar, Jacob. . 

Short, James D 

Schneider, Joseph. . . 

Schwallie, John 

Schwallie, Michael . . 

Thorp, Sarah J 

Troutwein, Jacob 
Wohlleber, Henry 



00 
425 

ioo" 

223 
20 
100 

193 
200 

57} 
227 
145 
418 
125 

30 



117} 
H'ii 

8l£ 
245 
377 
110 
120 

67 
167 
289 
131i 
250 

2011 ; 

Hi:ii- 

68 
100 

90 
252 



P.O. ADDRESS. 



Ashridge 

Seolt P.O., Adorns Co, 

Ashridge 
Scott P. O 

Ashridge 

Scott P. O 

Ashridge 

Russellville . . . 

Ashridge 

Scott P. O 

Ashridge 

Scott P. O 

Ashridge 

Scott P. O 

Ashridge 



OCCUPATION. 



Farmer 

Blacksmith 

Farmer 

Blacksmith 

Farmer 

Farmer and J. P 
Farmer 

Teacher 

Farmer 



Bavaria, Ger 

Adams Co., O. . . . 
Harrison Co., Ta. . 

Brown Co., O 

Delaware 

Brown Co., O 

Highland Co., O. . 
Brown Co., O 



Co. Tyrone, Ireland 
Brown Co., O 



Adams Co., O 

Wurtemberg, Ger. . . 
Highland Co, O. . . . 
Washington Co.,Pa 

Brown Co., O 

Washington Co., Pa 
Brown Co., O 



Adams Co., O. 
Co. Tyrone, Ireland 
Essex Co., N. Y. . 

Bavaria, Ger. 

Adams Co., O. . . . 

Prussia, Ger 

Brown Co., O 

Alsace, Ger 

Hamilton Co., O. . 
Wurtemberg, Ger. 
Bavaria, Ger 



JEFFERSON TOWNSHIP. 



Brown, John 

Baird, John 

Conn, Albert 

Conn, Robert 

Claybangll, Wm. T . 
Cropper, John P. . . . 
Donalson, John .... 

Drake, R. C 

Evans, L. J 

Evans, Wilford H. , . 

Fuller, W. P 

Fraucess, Joseph . . . 

Gilliland, W. H 

Geschwind, John . . . 
Goldsberry, Win. M. 

Glaze, Samuel C 

Henry, John 

Johnson, Wm. L. . . . 

Jacobs, W. B 

Kendle, Lee 

Kenclle, Leroy J. . . . 
Kaucher, Charles . . . 
Kirkpatrick, Geo. L. 

Kindle, G. W 

Lafabre, J 

Laycock, N. W 

McCormick, A. A. . . 

Mefford, S. F 

MeCreight, Joseph . 

Mannon, R 

MeCreight, M. T. . . 

Miller, Johnson 

Mefford, Walker 

Miller, R. A 

Mann, N. S 

Mitchell, Wilson 

Pilson, James 

Porter, James A 

Parry, Thomas 

Pickerel), J. W 

Richey, Wm 

Richey, J. P 

Roth, Joseph 

Seip, J. D 

Sidwell, Geo. E 

Salisbury, J. N 



202 
162 
193 



75 
51 



230 

1654, 

143 

200 

187 

185 

160 



Red Oak 
Russellville 



Red Oak 
Russellvill 



Russellville 
Red Oak 
Russellville 



Red Oak 
Russellville 



Red Oak 
Russellvill, 
Red Oak 



Red Oak 
Russellville 



Red Oak 
Russellville 



Farmer 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Farmer & Teacher. 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Wagoninaker 

Farmer 

Carriagemaker. . . . 

Farmer 

Wholesale Tobae'st 

Farmer 

Cooper 

Farmer 

Lawyer 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Minister 

Farmer 

Clerk ..'.[[...... 

Farmer 

Merchant 

School Teacher . . . 
Physician 



Brown Co., O 

Adams Co., O. . . . 
Brown Co., O 

Ireland 

Clark Co., Iud 

Dearborn Co., Ind. 
Mason Co., Ky. . . . 
Brown Co., O 

Cleveland, O 

Brown Co., O 

Baden, Ger 

Brown Co., O 

Adams Co., O. . . . 
Brown Co., O 

Augusta Co., Va. . 

Brown Co., O 

Adams Co., O. . . . 
Brown Co., O 

Alsace, France . . . 
Alleghany Co., Pa 
Brown Co., O 



1850 
1818 
1839 
1818 
1817 
183S 
1834 
1823 
1819 

183S 
1836 
1828 
1822 
1824 
1840 
1849 
1831 
1870 
1851 
1818 
1819 
1813 
1832 
1844 
1827 
1844 
1870 
1839 
1817 
1840 
1866 
1805 
1839 
1837 
1S55 
1852 
1854 



1823 
1807 
1844 
1824 
1817 
1859 
1855 
1836 
1845 
1817 
1854 
1817 
1865 
1874 
1844 
1848 
1818 
1856 
1841. 
1845 
1811 
1857 
1853 
1837 
1830 
1824 
1833 
1817 
1856 
1841 
1870 
1827 
1834 
1832 
1840 
1853 
1807 
1837 
1848 
IS 1 7 
1833 
1840 
1859 
1854 
1855 
1825 



JEFFERSON TOWNSHIP-Continued. 



Schwallie, George . 
Sehnetzer, John . . . 
Shotwell, John 
Tyler, George P. . 
Thompson, N. E. . . 
Williamson, John . 
Williamson, A. M. . 

Woods, F. M' 

Williams, L. H. . . 

Woods, A B 

Wilkins, E. P. . . . 
Work, John W. . . 



4™ f p ' °- ADDRESS. 



Russellville 
Red Onk . 
Russellville 

Red Oak '. 
Russellville 



Farmer 

Blacksmith 

Carpenter 

Salesman 

Fnrmer 

Proprietor Hotel . . 

Physician 

Fnrmer and Trustee 

Lawyer 

Farmer 



Brown Co., O 

Dearborn Co., Ind.. 
Clermont Co.* O. . . 
Herkimer Co., N. Y. 

Brown Co., O 

Fleming Co., Ky. . . 
Brown Co., O 



lEWIS TOWNSHIP. 



Amhrustcr, J 

Allen, J D 

Bcrz, Charles 

Berz, Otto 

Bainuin, H 

Boles, David 

Barker, Wm. B 

Brooklmnk, John W.. 

Bartlow, F. M 

Bolender, John W. . . 

Boleuder, Lewis 

Burr, David 

Bolender, Solomon. . . 
Boehm, Frederick W . 

Boehm, Ernest 

Boehm, Louis 

Bower, John 

Bolender, Joseph .... 

Bolender, Clark 

Brookbank, Joseph W 

Chapman, A. T 

Cassat, E 

Clark, Joseph 

Canary, W 

Cochran, Samuel .... 

Craighead, E 

Crawford, John 

Carter, M. L 

Drake, B. F 

Dugan, J. C 

Dugan, Washington. . 

Derers, William 

Doty, Owen 

Day, G. W 

Day, B. F 

Dugan, J. B 

Eliis, A. W 

Ellis, P. N 

Ellis, P 

Elliott, Mrs. A. L 

Ellis, John E 

Ellis, W. P 

Ellis, S. W 

Ellis, J. W 

Early, E. K 

Foore, Mrs. C. ..... . 

Fly, J 

Foore, Elizabeth 

Fenton, J. W 

Gardner, James D. . . 

Gardner, Eliza 

Gardner, Wm. M. 
Gardner, John F. . . 

Gardner, B. B 

Groppenbacher, John 

Gross, Henry 

Gardner, J. M 

Gardner, J. D 

Griffith, Hamilton. . . 

Guthrie, D. S 

Harrison, C. E 

Harrison, H. B 

Hopkins, James .... 

Heizer, John 

Heizer, Joseph 

Hannah, John F 

Hendrickson, J 

Inuis, Martha 

Jennings, John A. . . 
Jennings, Martin, C. 

Jones, Toliver 

Jones, G. W 



99 

149 

500 
93} 
84i 



120A 
19i 



192J 
122 



60 



09'] 
140 
325 

12i 
106 
500 
124 J- 

las;; 



167 
212 

98+ 



Higginsport. . 
Georgetown . . 
Higginsport. . 



Smiths Landinj 
Higginsport. . 



Feesburg 
Higginsport. . 



Feesburg . . . 
Georgetown . 
Higginsport. 



Georgetown . 
Higginsport. 



Felicity .... 
Feesburg . . . 
Georgetown . 
Higginsport. 



Feesburg . . . 
Higginsport. 
Feesburg . . . 
Higginsport. 
Georgetown . 



Feesburg . . . 
Higginsport. 



Augusta, Ky. 
Higginsport. 



Feesburg . . . 
Higginsport. 



246 


Feesburg .... 
Georgetown . . 


165 


Feesburg .... 


72 


II iLT^iiisport . . 




Georgetown . . 


66^ 





Blacksmith 
Physician . . 
Carpenter. . 
Farmer . . . 



Carpenter . 



Cabinetmaker 
Farmer 



Tobacco Dealer . 



Teamster . 
Carpenter. 
Farmer . . 



Tobacco Dealer. . 

Farmer 

Merchant 



Dealer in Tobacco . 
Farmer 



Shoemaker 
Merchant . 
Farmer . . 



Tobacco Dealer 

Farmer 

Tobacco Dealer. . . . 
Farmer 

Far. & TobVo Deal 
Farmer 

Physician 

Revenue Service . . . 
Druggist 



Blacksmith . 
Farmer . . . 



Baden, Ger 

Ireland 

Germany 

Clermont Co., O. '. 

Brown Co., O 

Bracken Co., Ky. . 
Brown Co., O 

Lincoln Co , N.C. . 

Brown Co.,0 

Saxony, Ger 

Brown Co.,0.'.'.'.'. 
Mercer Co., Pa. . . 
Bruwn Co., O 

Hamilton Co., O. . 
Brown Co., O 

Bracken Co., Ky. . 
Brown Co., O. . . . . 

Bavaria, Ger. 
Brown Co., O 

Bavaria, Ger 

Bucks Co., Pa. 

Warren Co., O 

Bracken Co., Ky. 
Clermont Co., O. 
Virginia 

Brown Co., O.. . . , 
Clermont Co., O. 
Fleming Co., Ky. , 
Bourbon Co., Ky. 

Delaware 

I Essex Co., Del... 

I Brown Co., O 

I Mason Co., Ky. . . . 



IS 20 
1S29 
1S36 
1S3G 
1S36 
1S16 



u LIST OF PATRONS OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO— Continued. 



LEWIS TOWNSHIP— Continued. 



Jones, C. C 

Johnson, linker 

Kftiilz, F. S 

Klein, John 

Knnlz. John 

Knutz, Caleb 

Kautz, Henry 

Kennedy, W. 11 

Kay, Z 

Love, Wesley 

London, Alfred 

Lerch, Louis & Aug. . . 

Lore, Sylvester 

Loyd, Willium 

Lindsey, Thompson ... 

Lamb, George 

Love, George A 

Livingston, A. M 

Line, W. V. & Mrs. R. 

Meinig, Julius 

McConeugbv, C.W.... 

Mueller, George P 

Mohn, Lewis*. 

Mefford, G. W 

Meizger, Joseph 

Merandn, A 

Meizger, John W 

Mathews, Mrs. Sarah. - 

Mathews, C. W 

Meizger, Jonas, Jr. . . . 

Metzger, John 

Metzger, Whalon 

Metzger, Elijah 

Manchester, A. B 

Metzger, Jonas, Sr. . . . 

Martin, A 

McKibben, W. W 

McMurehey, John .... 

Miller, J. R 

Mathews, William .... 

Martin, J. A 

Neu, Peter , 

Neu, Lewis 

Owen, T. H 

Owen, Joseph H 

Osborn, Geo. P 

Park, T. M 

Park, A. J 

Patterson, C. W 

Park, RuBsel 

Park, J. W 

Prat her, Artemiis 

Rice, Joseph 

Ricliy, Charles L 

Rice, R. D 

Richards, James 

Richey, Lewis 

Richey, D. M 

Richey, John L 

Rees, J. W 

Shideler, W. L 

Smith, E. W 

Schauf, Henry 

Steward, J. W 

Shinkle, M 

Shinkle, W. L 

Shinkle, J. F 

Shinkle, T. C 

Smith, C. W. F 

Shinkle, B. B 

Sargent, Wm. F 

Slayton, Z. T 

Siayton, J. W 

Sallee, Mat 

Slack, Amos 

Schnider, Christopli 

Sells, Benjamin , 

Taylor & Voires 

Troutraan, H 

Thompson, John 

Thomas, Samuel, Jr 

Thomas, W L , 

Troutman, Lewis 

Tolin, J. N 

Teegarden, William 

Trout, A. W 

Trout, D. F 

Tatman, R. TJ 

Trout, John C 

Tront, D. B 



125| 



208 



122i 



217 

mh 

163^ 
I22£ 
112 

55 k 

16 

94 
115 
173£ 

93 

68 

&0 
286 
114 

62 



220 
142£ 



272 
82£ 



125 

110£ 

100J 

10U£ 



1655 
24 
80£ 



45 
H7£ 



Georgetown . 
Feesburg . . . 
Higginsport. 



Georgetown . 
Feeshnrg . . . 
Georgetown . 
Higginsport. 



Augusta, Ky. , 
Higginsport. . 

Felicity 

Higginsport. . 
Georgetown . . 
Feesburg 



Georgetown . 
Higginsport . 



Higginsport. 
Feesburg . . . 
Felicity 



Higginsport 



Feesburg . . . 
Higgiusport. 



Feesburg 

Smith's Laud'} 
Higginsport. . 

Georgetown , . 
Feesburg 



Higginsport . . 



Augusta, Ky. 
Higginsport. 



Higginsport. 
Feesburg . . . 
Higginsport. 



Augusta, Ky. 
Higginsport . 



Feesburg . 
Felicity . . . 
Feesburg . 



OCCUPATION. 



Tobacco Dealer. . . 
Proprietor Saloon . 
Farmer ......... 



Trader 

Farmer 

Physician .... 
Tobacco Dealt 

Farmers 

Farmer 



Justice of the Peace 
Fanner 



Tinner . . . 
Merchant . . 
Shoemaker . 
Farmer . . . 



Fanner and Minister 
Farmer 



Farmer & Merchant 
Fanner 



Merchant . 
Farmer . . 



Carpenter 



Carpenter 
Farmer . 



Teacher 
Farmer 



Merchant 

Teacher 

Merchant 

Tobacco Dealer. 
Fanner 



Vintage 

Farmer 

Lumber Dealers. . . . 

Cigar Maker 

U.S.A. Storekeeper 

Farmer 

Florist 

Farmer 

Blacksmith 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Farmer 



Brown Co., O. . . . 
Atleghany Co., Pa 
Brown Co,, 0 . . - 

Germany l 

Brown Co., O.. . . 

Clermont Co., 0. 
Mason Co., Ky. . . 
Brown Co., O ... 

Hamar, Ger 

Brown Co., 0 

Bourbon Co., Ky. , 
Clermont Co., O. . 
Adams Co., Pa. . . 
Masun Co., Ky. . . . 
Saxony, Ger. . . . . . 

Brown Co., O 

Germany 

Pennsylvania 

Brown Co., O 

Clermont Co., 0. . 
Brown Co., O 

Clermont Co., O. . 

Rhode Island 

Clermont Co., 0. . 

Pennsylvania 

Brown Co., 0. . . . . 

Scotlund 

Clermont Co., O. . 
Brown Co., 0 

Adams Co., 0. . . . 
Maryland 

Brown Co., 0. . . . . 

Bracken Co., Ky.' ! 

Pennsylvania 

Brown Co., 0 

Bavaria, Ger 

Brown Co., 0 

Bracken Co., Ky. . 

Brook Co., Va 

Brown Co., 0 

Clermont Co., O. . 

Brown Co., 0 

Miami Co., 0 

Middlesex Co., Ct. 

Baiern, Ger 

Brown Co., 0 

Germany 

Brown Co., 0 

Clermont Co., 0. . 
Brown Co. , 0 

Hamilton Co., O. . 

Bavaria, Ger 

Brown Co., O 

Lewis Co., Ky. . . . 

Brown Co., 0 

Payette Co., O 

Brown Co., O 



1X32 
185K 
1845 
1854 
1846 
1S3S 
1843 
1873 
1815 
1837 
1828 
1840 
1840 
1823 
1802 
1S29 
1870 
1855 
1810 
1S6S 
1826 
1849 
1805 
1818 
181G 
1820 
1859 
1812 
1839 
1835 
1807 
1842 
1830 
1838 
1830 
1822 
1832 
1822 
1851 
1830 
1840 
1836 
1804 
1835 
1835 
1829 
1833 
1837 
1834 
1817 
1835 
1842 
1836 
1848 
1862 
1829 
1851 
1843 
1846 
1834 
1859 
1838 
1863 
1845 
1815 
1837 
1838 
1845 
1849 
1843 
1859 
1849 
1819 
1838 
1830 
1852 
1835 
1812 
1848 
1815 
1841 
1842 
1850 
1840 
1842 
1835 
1837 
1844 
1843 
1840 



LEWIS TOWNSHIP-Concluded. 



Tront, David 

Tatmnn, .lolm H 

Tatman, O. P . 

Thompson, A.J 

Utter, S. li 

Van Brigglc, Eugene . 

Winters, J. D 

Woods, John 

WaterBeld, S 

Waterlield, R 

Wells, James C 

Wittmnier, Ernst 

Wallace, .1. C 

Wise, Samuel 

Wise, Geo. P 

Williams, J. D 

Winters, P. L 

Wise, William 

Wolf, Philip 

Wolf, Lewis 

Winters, W. M 

White, Edwnrd, Sr. . . 

White, J. E 

White, W. M 

Yearsley, William 
Yonng, R. L 



13-4 
43 
35J 

no 

167 



105 



Peesbnrg . . 

Higginsport 
Georgetown 
Higginsport 



Felicity . . . 
Higginsport 



Felicity 

Higginsport 



Georgelown 
Feesburg . . 



Higginsport 



OC0UFATION. 



Supt. Co. Infifmar 

Farmer ' 

Proprietor Hotel . 

Druggist 

Stone Mason 
Farmer 

Merchant!!!.'.'!! 
Far. & Pro S S. M 

Blacksmith 

Tobacco Dealer. . 



NAITVITY. 


Sell I'd 
'" C °' 


Brown Co., O 


1810 




1849 


; ; : ! ; 


1840 


" 


1836 


Clermont Co., O. . . 


1864 


" 


1875 


Brown Co., O 




1842 


1821 


Clermont Co , O. 


1 8 IT 


Brown Co., 0 


1842 




1819 


Baden, Ger 


1853 


Brown Co , O 


1822 




1819 




1837 




1849 




1844 




1821 


Germany 


1854 


1854 


Brown Co , O 


1850 




1809 


Tuscany, Italy 


1856 


Brown Co., O 


1837 




1840 


Bracken Co., Ky. . . 


1838 



PERRY TOWNSHIP. 



Allen, John 

Aubry, Peter 

Aubry, John 

Amiot, Frank, Jr 

liamber, Thomas 

Berger, Joseph L 

Brnlport, Leo 

Bivans, S. J 

Bivans, A. A 

Brislht, H , 

Barry, David 

Barry, Thomas 

Bnsey, James 

Brnlport, Stephen 

Berger, Joseph 

Bouhvare, Leonidas 

Bomber, W. F 

Boyle, John 

Boyle, William 

liri'stlin, Anthony 

Brnlport, J. B 

Bishop, Nathan 

Campbell, James 

Carr, W. E 

Cushing, John, Jr 

Gushing, John, Sr 

Crone, James 

Curless, Samuel B 

Conrard, Charles 

Conrard, James 

Cbeymal, Rev. William 

Chaney, Cha's C 

Chaney, Levi 

Chaney, John G , 

Carroll, William 

Cuogan, James 

DiMen, John 

Daly, C 

Dietrich, Arlolph 

Dunham, G 

Dietrich, Bernard 

Dutton, F. X 

Dunham, Wilson 

Davis, E 

Eichler, Dr. F 

Fox, Jacob M 

Gallaher, Milton 

Gallaher, John 

Gauche, Anthony 

Gustin, Bennjah 

Gustin, John B 

Gustin, J. W 

Gustin, I 

Hanck, N 

Halle, M 

HalUted, Jas. W 

Hahn, Geo 

Halm, Wm 



700 
412 



610 
240 
200 



1181 
57 
125 



110 
607 



134 
150 
275 
450 



53 

81* 
60 



300 
123 



119 
208 



Fayetteville 



Vera Cruz . 
Bl an Chester 
Fayetteville 



St. Martins 
Fayetteville 



Fayetteville 
Blanchester 
Fayetteville 



St. Martins 
Fayetteville 
St. Martins 
Fayetteville 
Vera Cruz . 
Fayetteville 

Vera Cruz . 
Blanchester 



Fayetteville 
Blanchester 



Farmer 

Blacksmith 

Farmer 

Farmer & Co. Com. 
Merchant 

Farm, & Contractor 
Farmer 

Marshal & Constable 

Merchant 

Furmcr 

Physician 

Carpenter & Farmer 
Farm. & Contractor 
Farmer 

Mechanic 

Mayor 

Farmer 

Teacher 

Farmer 

Carriagemaker 

Priest 

Teacher 

Farmer 

Farmer and Teacher 
Farm. & Contractor 

Farmer 

Miller and Farmer. . 

Priest 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Priest 

Farmer 

Farmer & Carpenter 

Physician 

Miller 

Farm. & Contractor 
Farmer 

Merchant , 

Furmer , 

Grocer 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Physician 

Farmer 

Farmer and Cooper 
Farmer and Teache 



Brown Co., O. . . 

France 

Brown Co., O.. . 

Germany 

Franco 

Highland Co., O. 
Brown Co., O. . . 

Ireland 

Brown Co., O. . . 

Ireland 

Covington, Ky. . 

France 

Brown Co., O. . . 
Clermont Co., O. 
Brown Co., O.. . 

Ireland 

Brown Co., O. . . 

Ireland 

France 

Rhode Island . . . 

Ireland 

Clermont Co., O. 
Hamilton Co., O. 
Ireland 

New Jersey .... 
France 

Highland Co., 6. 
Pennsylvania... 
Highland Co., O. 
Warren Co., O.. 
Ireland 

Alsace, France. . 
Brown Co., O.. . 

France 

Utica, N. Y. ... 
Brown Co., O. . . 

Germany 

Brown Co., O. . . 

Ohio 

Lawrence, O . . . 

France 

Brown Co., O. . . 
Pennsylvania . . . 
Brown Co., O. . . 
Warren Co., O. .. 
Bavaria, Ger. . . . 
Adams Co., O. . 
Brown Co., O. . . 

Germany 

Warren Co.. O. . 



48 




SARDINIA 

Washington Twp. ) 



ScaZeugo SooTs to c/t> Irich 



WINCH EST ER n 

'Ms. 





j-j ' "■ 








" ,v 


Ukr r - 


'■'■''/, ' 


'iil'llt V i 

.■/,■;<■,■„,■;, 


J//V/; 
| \K„ r 


,v;.?: ■ 


I? ' 

,.v /.. ' 


J/,,v L 
inv 


n & r 

m - 


4^ 


w ,;■ 


« f > i 
! ' p 


-gfc 


■ 

? - 

I'T V 



□ 

3 

J.JGrkpa. 






Qi'/'J/f),.//! 


Jtrt.L.T/u 














53 




3| si 







IL 



Fees burg 

'-EeWtS Twp.) Scale SO limb to em inaTt 



51 



EE 



7T7 


ri j 


Ml 



















A tJolir.v 




■ 




Decatur 











ft 




— \i 
















^ 





4- 



J Us 1* 


















l&V" *i 


/ - n 





JohnllGordv 




Decatur Business References. 

Joseph Stevenson, Druggist. 

Robert Stevenson, Priprietor of Hotel. 

Wax. C. Baird, Constable. 

S. h. B. Blacke, Physician and Surgeon. Residence 
•* and Office on Eagle Street north of Main. Ail 
oalla promptly attended to. 
C. B. & W. H. Kirkpatrick, Manufacturers of Woollen 
Goods, such as Blankets, Plain and Fancy Cassi- 
mers, Doeskins, Clothe, Tweeds, Satinets, Joans, 
Plain and Plaid l^iannels, Knitting Yarns, &c. 
Highest Market Price paid for Wool. 
M. A. Neel, Dealer in Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, Notions, Hardware, Qaeeni- 
ware, &c. South of Decatnr near township line. 
J. C. Marshall, Proprietor of the Jefferson Mills on the 
west fork of Eat;le Creek, 2- miles S. E. of Uussel- 
vill. Cash paid for Wheat. Custom work 
promptly donB. 
BainI & Slevensou, Proprietors of the Southern Ohio 
Grist Mills, at the junction of the east and west 
forks of Eagle Creek, 2£ miles south of Decatur. 
J. M. Shaw, Blaoksmith, 2£ miles S. of Decatur on 
Eagle Creek. A specialty made of Steel Smithing 
and work of all kinds on Plows. Patronage earn- 
estly Solicitor! . 



Feesburg Business References. 



in Confectioneries, Groceries, Tii 
,ro, aud Notions. Also keeps Ice 



i Cattle, Hogs, Sheep, and 



J. E. White, Deal 

Cream and Soda-wi 

W. H. Kennedy, Deale 
Country Prodaoe. 

Trout, Norm & McKibben, Dealers in Dry Goods, Gro- 
ceries, Hardware, Medicines, Hats, Caps, Boots, 
Shoes, and Rubbers. Ready-made Clothing, &o. 
Customers will find our Btock complete, compn'S' 
ing many articles it is impossible here to men 
tion. 

W. M. White, Proprietor of Saw and Grist Mills, Manu- 
facturer aud Dealer in Lumber, Lath, Paling, and 
Head Staves. Mill located £ mile south of F 

W. M. Martin & Son, Dealers in Dry Goods, Grooei 

Hata, Caps, Boots, ^hoe3, Queeusware, Hardware, 
Drugs, and Patent Medicines, and a variety of 
Notions. Store on the corner Middle and Main 
Cross Streets, 



Sardinia Business References. 

I. M. Beok, M.D., Physician and Surgeon. Residence 
and Office, oor. Main and Winchester Streets. 

A. H. Glenn, Dealer in PureDrmiB and Patent Medi- 
cines, Paints, Oils, Varnishes, &u. &o. Physicians' 
Prescriptions carefully compounded, Residence 
on Main Street. 

J. W. Knight, Undertaker and Dealer in 1'uruilare of 
all kinds. Cheap for cash. Main Streut. 

James Mclntire, Dealer in Dry Good*, Notions, Hats, 
Caps, Boots, Shoes, Clotbiug, Hardware, Queens- 
ware, Groceries, &c. Cheap for cash or good 
country produce. Also a fall line of Millinery 
Goods by Miss P. A. Mclntire, one door west. 

Mrs. Mary A. McNeehy, Milliner and Dressmaker, of 
thirty years' experience. Keeps a full line or Mil- 
linery Goods constantly on hand. Work dono to 
order. Graham Street. 

N. S. Dnnn, Proprietor of Dunn Honse, oorner of Main 
and Winchester Streets. Good Stabling connected 
with the House. 

Something New. 

A A. Kennedy, Double Store, Dry Goods, Notions 
Hats, Caps, Boots, Shoes, Clothing, &o. &C. i- 
Room No. 1. Stoves, Tinware, Hardware, &o. i 
Room No. 2. James A. Kennedy, Saleman; Call 
and see thorn. Cop. Main and Winchester Sts. 

W. W. Vance, Dealer in Groceries, Confectioneries, 
Pare Liqnor, Beer, &o. Main Street. 

P. R. Kincaid, Stook Dealer. 

J. B. McClain, M.D., Regular Physician and Snrgeon 
since 18fjl. Otfice and residenoe on Winchester 
Street, between Main and Graham. All oalls 
promptly attended to, day or night. 




Arnheim Business References. 

W ' BnS 8 ' Ph ^'' »'»» Carpenter and 

P O^ George'town C8 m " eS S ' W ' "'A™ 1 '" 1 - 
Job taike^p Proprietor of Steam Saw Mm ind Spoke, 

!32£"$. 5" R^SiSs?-'- ^ -°- s - E - »' 

Joseph List, Ulaoksmith and Horseshoer Att.„J , to 
repairs of all kind,. AUo Justice of the P.ao, 
Hesidenoe J mile W. of Arnheisi 



58 




Res. of Fred.R.Kautz.PleasantTp. Brown Co. Ohio 




White ()akVallk\ 




I J. inters 

Jf7 



631 



No. 7_30 



Scale 3 Indies fo t/ie 3/Rie 




C: W. & S. G. Boyd, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
and Manufacturers of Building and Dressed Lum- 
ber, Doors, Blinds, Sasli, Door and Window Fratnes, 
Shingles, Tobacco Hogsheads, Flat-boats, &o. 
Branch Office No. 49 W. Front Street, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. Also Dealers in Dry Goods, Groceries, No- 
tions, etc., and General Supply Store, High Street. 
Geo. Heinz, Proprietor of Blacksmith Shop. Horse- 
shoeing and Jobbing of all kinds. A Bpecialty of 
Spring and Road Wagons. 
J. B, Wheeler, Carpenter and Bridge Builder. Resi- 
dence and P. 0. Levanna, Ohio. 
P. Rossman, Proprietor of Wino and Lager Beer Sa- 
loon, Corner High and Apple Streets. Also Boot 
and Shoe Maker. 
Chas. E. Galbreath, Clerk at C. W. and S. G. Boyd's. 
August Bruechweh, Proprietor of Wine and Beer Sa- 
loon. Has a Farm of 48 acres of good improved 
Land for sale. Terms reasonable. Located H 
miles W. of Levanna and 3} from Ripley on River 
Road. 

Robert N. Chunn, Engineer of 11 years* experience, at 
present engaged with C. W. it 8. G. Boyd for 2 
years. 

U. N. Creokbaum, Clerk with C. W. h S. G. Boyd. 




i 



STERLING 



Scale £ inches- lo Uic MSJe 



Locust Rii)(jE 

Tik<' TtrpJ 



Locust Ridge Business References 

W. H. Langstaff, M.D. Res. and Office Locu9t 
2. M. Blair, Trustee of Pike Township. P. 0. Mt. Orab 
H. H. & W. H. Jones, Dealers in Merchants' Gargline 
Oil and Worm Tablets, Dry Goods, Groceries 
Mediomes, Hats, Caps, Boots, Shoes, Rubbers' 
Ready-made Clothing, &o. Customers wall find 
oar Btook complete, comprising many articles im- 
possible here to enumerate, and all sold at mode, 
rat* prices. 

Sterling Township Business References. 

Robert Farqaer, Dealer iu Dry Goods, Notions, Boots, 
Shoos, Hats and Caps, Groceries, Hardware, 
Queensware, &c. &o. Country produce taken in 
exchange for goods. Store located at Centreville. 

Wen. N. Steward, Dealer iu Dry Goods, Clothing, Hats, 
Caps, Boots and Shoes, Groceries, Notions, Hard- 
ware, and Queensware. Store at Cross Town. 

V. B. Creager, Justice of the Peace, and Collecting of 
Claims made a speoialty. Located 1 mile north 
of the Election House. 

Dr. Geo. McDonough, Physician and Sargeoi 
at Res., Cross Town. 

Joseph Simpkins, all kinds of Blaoksmithing clone to 
order promptly. Andersonville. 

Arthur Prall, Dealer in Dry Goods, Clothing, Hats, 
Caps, Boots and Shoes, Groceries, Notions, hard- 
ware and Queensware. Country produce taken 
in exchange for goods. Store at Kirbyville. 



TXEW 'BARMONY" 

(SEBce Twp.) Scale :iO Jiucb. to, in inch 

C. On'cc^ | ] IS JlATDyer -" 7 < l - 









i 

w 








w 


■A 





-J|_ 



New Harmony Business References. 

Lewis Thompson, Proprietor of P. 0. Store, Dealer in 
Dry Goods, Groceries, Hardware, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Ready-made Clothing, Patent Medi- 
oines, &o. &c. 




LIST OF PATRONS OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO^Continuec. 



PERRY TOWNSHIP-Concluded. 



Haines, Zimri H. . . . 
Halm, Murk A 

Hacket, Daniel 

Hacket, Denbam ... 

Hanson, Mrs. Ann. . 

Hoben, Mike 

Hatton, M 

ImhofF, John 

Jordan, Elisha 

Jaequerain, John B 

Kelly, John C 

Kelly, Robert , 

Kelly, Bernard, Sr. . . 

Kelly, Bernard, Jr. . . 

Long, Patrick 

Lear, Joshua; 

Long, Elias 

Little, Elias 

Little, Absalom 

Little, Jas 

Linne, Henry 

Mosset, C. A 

MeConn, Daniel 

Murray, H. W 

Murphy, David 

Marshall, Hugh 

Meyer, John 

MeCafferty, John P. . 
Mair, Etienne Joseph 

Mitchell, Thomas 

Murphy, Daniel 

Murphy, R 

Murray, T. S 

Mitchell, Daniel , 

Mullen, Albert 

McCarren, T. B , 

MeConn, John , 

Xead, Jas 

Owens, John 

Oliver, Russell 

Reddick, R. P 

Reeves, John 

Runyan, B. H 

Savage, P 

Savage, J. C 

Schwartz, Henry 

Scanlin, Wm. H. . . , 

Smith, R, F ... 

Smith, L. D [ \ 

Snell, Zachariah 

Snell, Martin 
Snt-II, David .... 

sndi, j. k. p 

Snider, Arnold 

Sharpe, D. W 

Snowhill, Amos 

Snowhill, Benjamin . . . 

Sourd, Chas 

Triplett, C. C 

Thuney, Joseph 

Tooley, Abraham...!.' 

Thomson, Wm. E 

Valteer, Leonard . 

Wynn, John 

White, V. C. . 

Wise, Ross '.',[[[ 

Ward, Jas. A . . [ 

Williams, J. R ][ 

Walsh, Edward 
Wynn Jas. ... 
Wynn, Ellen....'!"]; 



Appelgate, Anna . . 

Brooks, N. B 

Bauer, Frederick 

Blair, 0. M ' 

Brown, W. Jj. ...... 

Colthar, J. M. . . . . . 

Carpenter, Simon. . . 

Dean, Elmore , 

Dunn, Perry T [ 

Dnnn, Ira B .... 

Day, Mrs. Wilmina . 
Day, James M. , . . . . 
Emmons, D. E 



P. 0. ADDRESS. 



OCCUPATION. 



West Woodville 
Blanchester 
West Woodville 



Fayetteville . 
St. Martins . 
Vera Cruz . . 
Blanchester . 
Marathon . . . 
Fayetteville . 



100£ 



110 
118£ 
168 
123 
100 
50 



160 



Vera Cruz . . . 

Fayetteville . . 
St. Martins . . 
Fayetteville . . 
West Woodvill 
Fayetteville . . 
West Woodvilh 
Fayetteville . . 

Marathon 
Fayetteville . . , 

St. Martins . . . 
Fayetteville . . . 

Vera Cruz 

St. Martins . . . 



Fayetteville . . 
Biuuehester . . 
West Woodvill. 
Fayetteville . . 

St. Martins . . 

Blanchester . . . 
St. Martins . . . 

Vera Cruz 

Blanchester . . . 
Fayetteville . 



St. Murtins 
iMaruthou . 
Blanchester 
West Woodville 
Fayetteville 
West Woodville 
Fayetteville 



West Woodv 
Fayetteville . 



Blanchester . 
St. Martins . 
Fayetteville . 



Farmer 
Farmer and ' 
Farmer 



Proprietor Hotel 
Insurance Agent 
Merchant & Farmer 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Merchant & Farmer 
Farmer & Tax Col . 
Farm. & Contractor 
Farmer 



Clinton Co., O. 
Brown Co., O. . 
New Jersey 
Brown Co., 0. . 
Ireland 



Miller and Farmer. 
Cooper and Farmer 
Farmer 



Merehant . 
Grocer . . 
Farmer . . 



Shoemaker & P. M 
Fanner and Tailor. . 

Farmer 

Merehant & Farmer 
Farmer 



18.15 
1 851 
1850 
1858 
1 357 
185& 
1843 
1844 
1867 
1848 
1835 
1833 

Ireland I 1832 



Bremen, Ger . 
N. Carolina . . 

Belgium 

Brown Co., 0.. 



PIKE TOWNSHIP-Concluded. 



Brown Co., 0. . 

Ireland 

Highland Co., 0. . 
Clermont Co., 0. . 
Hamilton Co., 0. . 
Warren Co., 0.. .. 



Germany 

Switzerland . . . 
Brown Co., O.. 
Ireland 



Merchant 
Fanner . . 



Farm. & Stock Deal 
Farmer 



Farmer and J. P. . 

Plasterer 

Attorney at Law . . 

Merchant ... 



Scotland 

Bohemia, Austrii 
Pennsylvania , . . 

France 

Ireland 



Hamilton, 0 

Kentucky 

North Carolina . . 
Cincinnati, 0. . . . 

Ireland 

Cincinnati, O 

Brown Co., 0 . . . . 
Hamilton Co., 0. . 
Cincinnati, 0 I 1839 



1845 
1855 
1873 
1813 
1857 
1858 
1S57 
1806 
1860 
1845 
1848 
1851 
1863 
I860 
1854 
1841 
1853 
1852 
1852 
1848 
1865 
1864 
1851 
1852 
1844 
1844 
1861 



Enrhart, A. E. 
Earhart, G. H 
Jones, Hi H 
Keethler, Da 
Kcethler, 0 P. 
Langstaff, W. H. 
Moyer, W. H 
Nenl, John 
Bussel, W. H. 
Stump, John B. 
Thompson, Lewis 
Wilson, David 
Wall, Mrs. E 
Wells, D. C. 
young, Joseph 




P. 0. ADDRESS 



Locust Ridge. 



Mt. Orab . 



Locust Ridge. 

New Hope , . . 
New Harmony 



Mt. Orab 

New Harmony . 
Surryville 



Farmer 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Physician . . . . 
Farmer 

Farmer and Teach 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Farmer 



NATIVITY 


Settl'd 
in Co. 


Brown Co., 0 


1^56 




184X 


Clermont Co., 0. . . 


1852 


Brown Co., 0 


1812 




1846 


Muskingum Co., 0. . 


1863 


Brown Co., 0 


1834 




1827 




1854 


Virginia 


1827 


Brown Co., 0 


1842 


Clermont Co., 0. . . 


1844 


Highland Co., 0: .. 


1874 


New Jersey 


1830 


Brown Co., 0 


1834 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 



Teacher 
Farmer 



Farmer & Teacher. . 
Farmer 

Merchant 

Miller and Engineer 
Farmer & Carpenter 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Saddler 

Farmer 

Farm, and Ins. Agt. 

Farmer 

Hame Maker 

Farmer & Merchant 
Farmer 



England . 
Warren Co., 0.. 
Brown Co., O. . . 



Highland Co., 0. 
Clermont Co., 0. 



Warren Co., 0 

Virginia 

Brown Co., 0 

New Jersey 

France 

Brown Co., O. . . . 

France 

Warren Co., O 

England 

France 

Cincinnati, O 

Hamilton Co., O. . 

Ireland 

Hamilton Co., O. . 



Brown Co.,0. . 
Ireland ....... 



1830 
1872 
1844 
1846 
1847 

1873 
1843 
1849 
1849 

1849 
1860 
1845 
1854 
1825 
1855 
1839 
1848 
1853 
1857 
1856 
1843 
1840 
1857 
1855 
1828 
1845 
1842 
1841 



PIKE TOWNSHIP. 



100 


New Harmony. 
Locust Ridge. . 

Surryville 

Mt. Orab 


IIOJ 

47 


229 
214 


Locust Ridge. . 
Mt. Orab 


133 
358 
386 


Surryville 
Mt. Orab 


187 




100 


New Hope .... 
Mt. Orab 



Farmer . . 
Carpenter 
Farmer . . 



Farm. & Stock Deal. 
Farmer 



Farmer and Teacher 



Maryland 
Brown Co., 0. 
Bavaria, Ger. . 
Mason Co., Ky 
Brown Co., 0. . 



Kentucky . 
Brown Co., 



Clermont Co., O. 
Brown Co., O. . . . 
Clermont Co., O. 



mr, 

1851 
1869 
1836 
1861 
1822 
1841 
1836 
1840 
1832 
1849 
1814 
1858 



Arzeno, L 

Arn, M 

Armstrong, A 

Andrews, Charles. . . 

Aliboll, E C 

Bielin, John P 

Bower, Jacob H 

Brady, John T 

Brose, J. E 

Brunner, Michael . . . 

Bruiiner, Henry 

Borden. B. C 

Baker, J. M 

Brown, T. J.. ..... . 

Brose, John G 

Burgett, John V. . . . 

Bayne, Silas 

Brady, William W. . 

Boehm, Gustavus A. 

Brady, Wm. D 

Brose, Jos. W 

Berry, M. D. L 

Berry, R. W 

Bower, Peter 

Braselton, John M. . 

Crnm, Alex. M 

Cnhall, Thomas . 

Cuhall, A. P 

Cnhall, Jas. H 

Crouch, C. B 

Cochran, Robert 

Davis, Mrs. P. A 

Drake, O. W 

Daugherty, J. P 

Dunham, James G. . . 
Delanv, Benjamin 

Day, H. P 

Drake, Cornelius 

Devore, P. L 

Drake, Robert 

Devore, J. W 

Day, J. C, Jr 

Davis, A. W 

Drake, Henry 

Dugan, Jackson 

Devore, James C 

EJlsberry, W. W 

Ellsberry, A. M 

Evnns, A. H 

Ellis, W 

Ellis, James R 

Evans, J. M 

Ellis, Geo. M 

Fite, Rufus L 

Frost, James B 

Frost, W. B 

Flaek, John 

Fee, E. B 

Gordon, Thomas W.. . 

Higgins, R. H 

Hanna, Wm. H 

Hanselraan, Jacob . . . 

Huslam, W. D 

Heizer, John 

Heizer, Lewis 

Heizer, J. F 

Hauck, Adam 

Hughes, George 

Hilbronner, Marks. . . 



10i 
160 
300 



Georgetowu . . 



Ripley 

Georgetown . 



68 
342J 
206 

95£ 
203 
372i 
120 



40 



lo5J 



109 
180 
218 

58} 

43} 
150 



Jeweller . . 
Merchant . 
Tnilor . . . 
Farmer . . 



Lawyer 

Civil Engineer. 

Sheriff 

Fanner \ 

Shoemaker .... 



68} 



20U 
246 
141 



Higginsport. . 
Georgetown . . 



Centre Point . 



Georgetown . 



Higginsport. . 



Georgetown . 



Coal Deale; 
Carpenter. 
Farmer . . 
Baker .... 
Farmer . . 



Carpenter. 
Grocer . . 
Farmer . . 



Georgetown . 



Higginsport. . 

Georgetown . . 
Centre Point . 

Georgetowu . . 



Centre Point . 

Higginsport . . 
Georgetown . . 



Carpenter. 

Farmer 

Milliner 

County Treasure 

.Minister . . 

Farmer 



Physician . 
Farmer . . 

Lawyer . . 
Farmer . . 

Physician . 

Lawyer. . . 
Druggist . 
Farmer . . 
Undertaker 

Teacher . . 
Farmer . . 
Blacksmith 
Farmer . 



Italy 

Baltimore, Md 

Westmorel'd Co. Pa. 
Derbyshire, Eng. . . . 

Brown Co., 0 

France 

Adams Co., O 

Brown Co., 0 

Baltimore, Md 

Bavaria, Ger 



Brown Co., 0. . 



Wurtemberg, Gel 
Brown Co., 0. . . 



1849 
1859 
1833 
1833 
1855 
1835 



Saxony, Ger. . 
Brown Co., O. . 



Germany 

Gibson Co., Ind.. 
Highland Co., 0. 
Brown Co., 0 



Clermont Co., O. 

Brown Co., 0 

Mason Co. , Ky. . . 
Brown Co., 0.. 



Mason Co., Ky. . 
Brown Co., 0.. . 



Clermont Co., 0. . 
Brown Co., O 

Ireland 

Clermont Co., O. . 
Trumbull Co., O. . 
Brown Co., O 

Wurtemberg, Ger. . 
Brown Co., O 

Nicholas Co., Ky. . 
Bavaria, Ger 



1845 

1844 

1828 

1833 

1843 

1806 

1825 

1851 

1845 

1841 

1847 

IS45 

1839 

1858 

1860 

181 9 

1845 

1843 

1837 

1838 

1862 

1826 

1819 

1850 

1835 

1837 

1813 

1843 

1846 

1850 

1831 

1826. 

1823 

1815 

1851 

1832 

1852 

1843 

1809 

1827 

1824 

1828 

1848 

1848 

1815 

1861 

1842 

1850 



1840 
1834 
1833 
1838 
1836 
1837 
1838 
1848 




Ml OllAB 

(jreeat Tyrja.J 

~~ VtoMr/o an/nch 
\ ' JVtt.&i. 
^j3. .1'. 




Mt. Orab Business References. 

Stroup & Hanna (Michael Stroup, M.D., R. D. Hanna, 
M.D. ), Physioiana and Surgeons, will attend to all 
oalls in their profession promptly. 

L. 8. Vance, Dealer in Groceries, Provisions, &o. &c. 

Lee Gray, Proprietor of " Geay Hodsb." 

D. Lee Day, Farmer. Stock Raising a speciality. Res. 

1£ mile north of Mt. Orab. 
Geo. W. Day, Farmer, Huckster, and Peddler. Res. 1^- 
mile north of Mt, Orab. 

E. Bratten, Farmer. Stock Raising a speciality. Res. 

Benton. 

Sam. N. Weeks, Dealer in Groceries, Provisions, No- 
tions, &0. &o. Everything cheap for cash. 

Healion & MoChesney (J. W. MoChesney, J. M. Hea- 
lion), Proprietors of Steam Saw Mill, Manufac- 
turers and Dealers in Lumber, Lath, aod Chair 
Stuff. Pay cash for logs. Mill located at Mt. 
Orab. 

N. R. Walker, Dealer in Drngs, Medicines, Paints and 
Oils, Fancy and Toilet Articles, Notions, Perfu- 
mery, Sponges, Fine Soaps, Books and Stationery, 
Coal Oil and Lamps, Field and Garden Seeds, Pure 
Wines and Liquors for medical U3e, Dye Stuffs. 
Groceries, &o. Physicians' prescriptions oarefully 
compounded. Also, Millinery and Dress Making, 
Cutting and Fitting done to order. All kinds of 
fancy goods constantly on baud by Mrs. Walker. 

B. R. Brown, Farmer. Stock raising a specialty. Res. 
3 miles northwest of Buford. 

Five Mile Business References. 



J. W. Shamon, Carpenter and Joiner; am prepared to 
do all kinds of work in my line with promptness 
and dispatch. 

Wm. W. White, Proprietor of Steam Grist and Steam 
Saw Mill ; Manufactures Flour and all kinds of 
Hard and Soft Lumber. Mill located miles 
east of Five Mile. 

E2ra Barker, Proprietor of Blacksmith Shop. All 
kinds of blacksmithing done to order. Shop lo- 
oated 1£ miles east of Five Mile. 

J. f 1 . Elliott, Machinist and Proprietor of Saw Mill, 
Manufacturer of all kinds of Hard and Soft Lum- 
ber. Mill located 1 mile north of Five Mile. 

J. J. Leonard, Dealer in Grooeries, Notions, &o. Also 
Cabinet and Shoemaker. Will attend to all or- 
ders in bis line promptly. Located at Five Mile. 

Washington Hair, Dealer in Dry Goods, Groceries, 
Hats, Caps, Boots and Shoes, &o. Everything m 
the Hue cheap for cash or produce. Five Mile. 

Thomas Sheldon, Notary Public and Collecting Claims 
a specialty. J mile west of Five Mile. 



Bkntox 

•• Ore t'li Two.) Scale 16 J}o3s to aivinch 



\ 





Cooper Sh 



Ore em 



« »j ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

■ - Scale £ inches to Uie Mile 



f fJwns 



& ■ /!%,„/ 




J'n/n- Snutr 



fits. 



J ■Tli flllcms 

-/so 



/ 33'// / ;i(/F/'~ \ ~ • 



72 



LIST OF PATRONS OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO— Continued. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP— Continued. 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP-Concluded. 



P. 0. ADDRESS. 



OCCUPATION. 



Hanselraan, G. W. . 

Heizer, J. & Wra. . . 

Hauck, Valentine. . 

Henize, C 

Hicks, "Wright 

Inskeep, Geo 

Jennings, Rees 

Jolly, S. H 

Jennings, H. L 

Jennings, G. B. 

Jennings, John 

Jones, John 

King, John W 

Kerans, Geo 

Koelble, Joseph 

Kautz, Gustavus. . . . 

Kimberly, S. D 

King, Thomas 

Kantz, Fred. R 

Knntz, John 

King, A. C. ....... 

Loudon, D W. G. 

Leeds, Thoa. J. 

Leeds, L. B 

Lady, A 

Lewis, J.J 

Liebermon, "William . 

Loudon, James 

Lay cock, P. W 

Loudon, II. C 

Lyon, Daniel 

Lauerman, Conrad . . 

London, V. M 

Lyon, Geo 

Lyon, W 

Lyon, Louis 

Lake, "William 

Laycock, J. Wm 

Laycoek, J. W. , . . . , 

Moore, J. B , 

McKnight, W.W. 

Marshall, J. H 

Marshall, John G. . . . 

McGroarty, P 

Murray, S. J 

Markley, John M. . . , 
McKibben, Harvey . . 
Marshall, J. G., Jr. . . 

Miles, L. B 

Moore, P. S 

Mathews, J. H 

Martin, S 

McFadden, Henry . . . 

Mitchel, Samuel 

Miller, B. W 

Markley, John 

Maklem, TV. P 

Neu, Jacob 

O'flara, CP 

Pearson, D. V 

Phillips, F. J 

Penn, L. B 

Peddicord & Dunn. . . 
Purdon, Mrs. R. D 

Parker, William 

Phillips, Geo. W 

Pohner, George 

Pangbnrn, Wm 

Parker, J. N 

Parker, Wm. R 

Purdum, Isaac W. . . . 
Phillips, Columbus . . 

Pangbnrn, J. H 

Pierce, Henry 

Pobst, Jacob 

Printy, John R 

Quinlan, A. G 

Roney, Enoch E 

Rees, D. A 

Richards, John T. . . . 

Risch & Dngin 

Rees, V. G 

Rees, A. W 

Reicbardt, Louis . . . 

Risch, Fred 

Rainey, Jacob S 

Rhodes, John G 

Stivers, James M 

Snedeker, Wm. A. . . . 
Stephenson, T 



158| 
1371 
17l| 



81* 
123 

no 
m± 

205 
40! 



137 
155 
1I6£ 
123 
85 



Higginsport > 

Georgetown . 
Higginsport . 
Georgetown . 



Russellville . . 
Higginsport. . 

Georgetown . . 



Higginsport. 



Higginsport. 
Georgetown . 



Centre Point . 
Higginsport. . 



Georgetown . . 



Centre Point . 
Georgetown . . 

Higginsport . 
Georgetown . . 
Higginsport. . 
Georgetown . . 



Hamilton Co., 0. . 

Virginia 

Brown Co., 0 

Wurtemberg, Ger. 
Brown Co., 0 



Clerk . . 
Farmer 
Tanner . 
Farmer 



Farmer 

Banker 

Tailor 

Cigar Maker . 
Farmer i . . . . 



Lawyer 
Printer 



Tailor 

Proprietor Hotel . . . 



Lawyer 



Cigar Maker 
Merchant . . 
Carpenter . 
Dentist 
Stonecutter 
Farmer < . . , , 



Tobacco Dealer 

Lawyer 

Banker and Farmer. 



Liverymen . 
Milliner . . . 
Printer . . . 
Farmer . . , 
Barber . . . 
Minister , . . 
Farmer . . . 



Farmer and Mille 
Farmer 



Lawyer 



Farmer . . . 
Blacksmith. 
Farmer ... 



Blacksmith . 
Farmer . . . 
Shoemaker . 
Surveyor . 
Merchant . . 
Physician . . 



Greene Co., Pa. 
New York 
Brown Co., 0. . 



Baltimore, Md. 
Alsace, Ger. lt . 
Brown Co., 0.. 



Clermont Co., O. 



Germany 

Pittsburg, Pa 

Wurtemberg, Ger. . 
Henry Co., Ky. . . . 
Brown Co., O 



Bavaria, Ger. . . . 
Brown Co., 0.. . 



Trumbull Co., O. . 



Ireland 

Massachusetts . . . 

Brown Co., 0 

Clermont Co., O. . 
Brown Co., O. . . . 
Baltimore, Md. . 

Canada 

Brown Co., O. , . . 



Maryland 

Brown Co., 0. . 
Adams Co., O. 
Brown Co., 0. . 



Frederick Co., Md. 
Brown Co., O 

Highland Co., 6. . 

Brown Co., O 

Hamilton Co., O. . 

Cincinnati, O 

Brown Co., 0 . . . . 



Bracken Co., Ky. . . 

Brown Co., O 

New Castle Co., Del, 

Bavaria, Ger 

Brown Co., 0 

Clermout Co., 0. . . . 
Brown Co., O 



Bavaria, Ger. , . 
Brown Co., O. . 



Hesse Darmstadt, G. 

Bavaria, Ger 

Brown Co., 0 

Kennebeck Co., Me. 
Adams: Co., 0 



HWJwn Co., 0.. 



1806 
1834 
1837 
1806 
1852 

1838 
184G 
1843 

1818 
1823 
1835 
1868 
1839 
1842 
1819 
1832 
1836 
1825 
1827 
1865 
1S64 
1834 
1846 
1848 
1806 
1851 
1845 
1850 
1852 
1822 
1828 
1842 
1845 
1808 
1847 
1822 
1846 
1837 
1833 
1833 
1862 
1851 
1853 
1838 
1848 
1863 



1833 
1846 
1813 
1864 
1827 
1833 
1856 
1846 

1825 
1860 
1867 
1872 
1821 
1831 
1821 
1830 
1845 
1841 
1834 
185S 
1813 
1857 
1845 
1844 
1838 
1866 
1848 
1842 
1851 
1867 
1839 
1870 
1SG3 
1800 
1834 



Stevenson, S. H 

Slephan, C 

Stephen, Adam 

Stinemao, T. F 

Single, Christian .... 

Stewart, D. J 

Shackelford, John . > . 

Shew, S. N 

Simpson, James 

Sharp, December 

Sturm, Henry 

Stephens, Margaret . . . 

Stigler, Henry 

Thompson, W. Jesse . . 

Thomas, David 

Thomas, T. 11 

Theis, Churles 

Tarbell, David 

Thompson, Charles D . 

Trncy, F. M 

Wilson, James 

Whitaker, W. E 

White, C. A 

West, Edward W 

Wilson, W. H 

Whaley, Morrisson 

White, Jacob 

Willi, William 

Wall, B. C 

Waterman, N. A 

Young, W. W 

Young, Robert 



164 
155i 



Georgetown , 



Higginsport . 
Georgetown . 
Higginsport. 
Georgetown , 



Higginsport. 
Georgetown . 



Centre Point . 
Georgetown . . 



Lawyer 
Grocer 



Farmer . . 
Carpenter 
Farmer , . 



Plasterer 
Farmer , 



Lawyer 



Merchaut 

Lawyer 

Farmer 

Fanner & Dairyn 
Carriagemaker. . . 
County Clerk 

Lawyer 

Salesman 

Teacher 

Carpenter 

Blacksmith 

Farmer 



Lawyer 
Weaver 



Brown Co., O 

Bavaria, Ger 

Wurtemberg, Ger. . , 
Harrison Co., Ky. . . 

Mason Co., Ky 

Brown Co., Ky 

Virginia 

Mississippi 

Saxony, Ger 

Bavaria, Ger. 

Brown Co., 0. ! . . . . 

Bracken Co., Ky. . . 

Bavaria, Ger 

Brown Co., 0 

Clermont Co., O. . . 
Westmorel'd Co., Pa. 
Sullivan Co., N. H. . 
Brown Co., 0 

Mason Co., Ky 

Brown Co., 0 

Ireland 



SCOTT TOWNSHIP. 



Bfngamnn, A. J., Jr. . 

Bivans, W. A 

Barns, Catherine 

Bail, T. J 

Bean, Simon K 

Colthar, Harrison . . . 
Elschlager, Christian . 

Gibson, H. C 

Guild, George H 

Johnson, W. R 

King, S. W 

McCall, B. B 

Robertson, James . . . 

Stansberry, E. A 

Stevens, J. K. P 

Stansberry, G. W. . . i 
Stansberry, John .... 

Smith, James H 

Thompson, F. W. ... 
Young, Henry 



104 



23 H 



New Hope . . 

Georgetown . 
New Hope . . 



Georgetown . . 
New Hope . . . 

Georgetown . . 



New Hope . . 
Mt. Orab . . . 
New Hope . . 

Georgetown . 
New Hope . . 



Teacher 

Physician 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Prop, of Hotel. . . 

Painter 

Teacher 

Farmer 

Physician 

Miller 

Farmer 

Lawyer 

Farmer 

Farmer and Miller 



Brown Co., 0 

Highland Co., O. 
Brown Co., 0 

Mason Co., Ky. . . 

Brown Co., O 

Baden Baden, Ger. 
Brown Co., 0. 

New York 

Highland Co., O. . 
Brown Co , O 

Ohio 

Brown Co., 0. . . . 

New Jersey 

Brown Co., 0 

New York 



STERLING TOWNSHIP. 



Bracelin, A. M 

Bishop, I 

Creager, V. B 

Crone, G. F 

Farquer, Robert 

Harker, Sabintf 

Holman, J. B 

Leonard, J. J 

Myers, M. V 

Morgan, John 

McDonough, George. . 

Prall, Arthur : 

Reddiek, Elisha 

Sheldon, Thomas 

Smith, Jacob B 

Steward, William N. . . 

Simpkins, Joseph 

Shannon, J. W 

Waits, Benjamin I 103i 

Walker, Michael | 56 



De La Palraa. 
Union Plains . 
De La Palma. 
Five Mile ... 
Union Plains . 

De La Palma. 
Five Mile 

Marathon 

De La Palma. 
Marathon .... 

Five Mile .... 

De La Palma. 
New Harmony 
Five Mile .... 
Union Plains . 



Teacher 

Farmer 

Farmer and J. P. 

Farmer , 

Merchaut & Farmer 
Farmer 

Cabinet &Shoemak'r 
Farmer 

Physician & Farmer 
Merchant & Farmer 

Farmer 

Notary Public .... 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Blacksmith 

Carpenter 

Farmer 



Hamilton Co., 0. . . 


1848 




1852 


Clermont Co., 0. . . 


1841 




1857 


Brown Co., 0 


1832 
1852 




1847 




1847 


Clermont Co., 0. . . 


1855 


Somerset Co., Pa. . . 


1835 


Hamilton Co., 0. . . 


1851 


Warren Co., 0 


1847 


Brown Co., 0 


1841 




1853 


Clermont Co., 0. . . 


1853 


Brown Co., 0 


1835 


Philadelphia, Pa. . . 


1855 


Brown Co., 0 


1845 




1837 


Clermont Co., 0. . . 


1818 



1837 
1858 
1831 
1839 
1863 
1834 
1864 
1817 
1831 
1855 
1853 
1837 
1837 



1852 
1859 

1842 
1837 
1857 

1826 
1843 
1837 
1864 
1S50 
1812 
1840 
1817 
1835 
1861 



1848 
1840 
1832 
1826 
1858 
1817 
1845 
1815 
1867 
1863 
1836 
1840 
1854 
1830 
1845 
1820 
1810 
1846 
1832 
1815 



74. 




LIST OP PATRONS OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO— Continued. 



77 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 



Atwood, John S. ..... . 

Baird, Chambers ...... 

Baunibach, G. , , 

Biehrl, Henry 

Bercaw, H. 0 

Bell, E. R 

Beyersdoerfer, Michael . 

Becker, N 

Beyersdorfer, W. C 

Benua, Peter 

Braun, Jordan 

Bodmer, A. C 

Bruce, Scott 

Boyd, C. W. &S. G 

Bulger, Joseph 

Bruecliweh, August 

Burgctt, N. M 

Burgett, John 

Bradford, Nancy Ann . . 

Bower, Sarah A 

Bradford, E. H 

Beasley, Mrs. Albertiue. 

Beusley, Jephtha C 

Bick, Thomas 

Beasley, Stephen A. . . . 

Chase, M. J 

Carey, John C 

Cochran, William 

Creekbahm, Frank M. . 
Campbell, Robert 

Coburu, William A 

Cochran, John F 

Chase, A. E 

Chase, A. Sydney 

Conn, L 

Creekbaum, J. T 

Carr, Robert 

Creekbuum, H. N 

Cahall, Robert W 

Cahall, R. P 

Chase, William P 

Carr, Sarah E 

Culler, R. V 

Carr, John 

Campbell, J. A. 

Culter, Thomas 

Carr, James 

Carr, John H 

Chunn, Robert N 

Downing, Hollis 

Dixon, W. A 

De Vore, E. Arthur. . . 

Dunham, John W 

Daly, David N 

Drake, W. P 

Dixon, David 

De Vore, J. L 

De Vore, B. L. & E. id. 

Delany, Wesley 

Dragoo, Samuel 

Dempsey, James 

Dugan, Albert 

Earley, George W 

Ellis, Warren W 

Bckhardt, 0 

Evans, George W 

Evans, J. W 

Edwards, 0 

Eubanks, John 

Frost, J. W 

Fulton, Morgan 

Frebis, Frank H 

Fitch, E. M 

Frost, Josiah 

Flaugher, W. J. W. . . . 

Flaugher, E 

Fox, John 

Fryer, Jacob 

Galbreath, W. T 

Gilliland, W. W 

Gilliland, Loyd 

Groomes, J. C 

Grim, L., Jr 

Greenhow, John J 

Galbreath, Chas. E 

Glaze, George W 

Greene, F. M 

Griffith, Mason 

Geiger, Jacob 

Gilliland, James 



59 
129 
100 
8} 

66 
300 
144 
193 



52 
lOli 



12f 



Ripley 



Levanna 
Ripley . 
Levanna 

Ripley . 



Levanna 

Ripley . . 

Red Oak 
Ripley . 

Levanna 
Ripley . 



Centre Point . 

Ripley 

Red Oak 



Ripley . 



Levanna . . . 

Ripley 

Georgetown . 
Ripley 



Prop. Livery Stable 
Attorney at Law . . 



Postmaster. . . 

Grocer 

Physician 
Cigar Maker . 

Teacher 

Druggist 

Salesman 

Cooper 

Baker 

Cooper ...... 

Lumber Dcalei 
Shoemaker . . . 
Farmer 



Farming. 

Physician 
Farming. 
Farmer . 



Piano Manufacturer 

Manufacturer 

Trader 

Life Insurance Agt 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Trader 

Piano Maker 



Trader 

Carpenter . . 
Plasterer . . . 

Clerk 

Fisherman . . 
Farmer 
Piano Maker 
Farming . . . 
Farmer 



Engineer 

Coal Dealer 

Physician 

Student 

Farmer 

Varnisher 

Trader and Farmer 
Farmer 



Farmers . 
Farmer . 



Clerk 

Agent 

Carp. <& Bridge Bdr 
Farmer 



County Recorder 
Farmer 



Tob. &Pork Dealer 

Druggist 

Farmer 

Far. & Tob'co Deal 
Farmer 



Wilcox Co., Ala. . . 

Adams Co., 0 

Hesse Darmstadt, G. 

Alsace, Ger 

New York 

Highland Co., O. . . 

Bavaria, Ger 

Loraine, France. . . . 

Brown Co., 0 

Bavaria, Ger 

Wurtemberg, Ger. . . 

Brown Co., 0. . . 

Lewis Co., Ky 

Mason Co., Ky 

Hesse Darmstadt, G 
Brown Co., 0 

Snow Hill, Md 

Brown Co., 0 



Gloucester, Eng. . . . 

Brown Co., O 

Orleans Co , N. Y. . 

Columbia, S. C 

Brown Co., O 

Ohio Co., Ind 

Co. Tyrone, Ireland 
Brown Co 

Warren Co., Pa. . . . 

Boston, Mass 

Brown Co., 0 

Clermont Co., O. . . 
Brown Co., O 



New York . . . 
Brown Co., O. 



Banker ........ 

Lawyer 

Farmer 

Photographer . . 
Furniture Dealer 

Painter 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Blacksmith 

Farmer & Carpenter 

Butcher 

Farmer 



Huntingdon Co., 1 

Brown Co., 0 

Adams Co., O. . . . 
Kennebec Co., M 
Brown Co., O. . . 
Ripley, Ohio 
Brown Co., O.. . . 
New York City . . 
Brown Co., O. . . . 



Co. Derry, Ireland 
Brown Co., O. . . . 



Bavaria, Ger. . . 
Brown Co., O. . . 

Fleming Co., Ky 
Brown Co., 0. . . 

Bavaria, Ger. . . 
Brown Co., 0.. . 



Fleming Co., Ky. 
Bavaria, Ger. . . . 
Brown Co., 0. . . . 



Clinton Co., 0 

Hamilton Co., O. .. 

Yorkshire, Eng 

Brown Co., O 

Clarke Co., Ind 

Brown Co., 0 

Wurtemberg, Ger. . . 
Pendleton Co., N.C 



1853 
1834 
1849 
1833 
1845 
1852 
1852 
1864 
1848 
1854 
1854 
18G7 
I860 
1849 
1869 
1859 
1843 
1848 
1816 
1840 
1823 
1813 
1809 
18-16 
1825 
1858 
1836 
1817 
1834 
1854 
1823 
1841 
1859 
1813 
1832 
1842 
1841 
1844 
1845 
1824 
1873 
1834 
1824 

1819 
1833 
1197 
1831 
1848 
1853 
1835 
1855 
1849 
1811 
1835 
1815 
1848 
1853 
1837 
1815 
1810 
1845 
1836 
1833 
1855 
1836 
1836 
1819 
1812 
1835 
1851 
1854 
1824 
1809 
1849 
1822 
1865 
1860 
181s 
1815 
1837 
1866 
1806 
1854 
1851 
1852 
1851 
1845 
1860 
1805 



UNION TOWNSHIP-Continued. 



Gilliland, W. A 

Germnnn, Michael .... 

Gardner, |. M. , „ 

Gardner, J. W 

Grow, Fred. . ........ 

Greincr, Peter 

Griffith, C. & Albert . . 
Gibbouey. George .... 

Garrett, J. II 

Hemphill, S 

Hensel, A 

Hclbling, J. P 

Hough, Charles 

Harrison, W. H 

Hughes, W. W 

Heinz, George 

Hudson, Harvey C. . . . 

Hughes, Jacob M 

Heizer, Edward 

Henry, Samuel 

Harding, G. W 

Herrmann, Jacob 

Howard, Cyrus 

Hopkins, John M 

Hauke, Ferdinand 
Hopkins, James A. . . . 

Hanser, Mrs. M 

Hatton, Samuel 

Henderson, E 

Jolly, Philip 

Jenkins, William 

Jackson, Porter 

Jones, John F 

Kerr, Margaret 

Kewler, Anton 

K.irb, Henry 

Knntz, George 

Kelly, A 

Kincaid, S. W 

Kinkead, Scott 

Kinkead, W. G 

Kinkead, G. H 

Kinkead, A. II 

Kinkaid, R. D 

Kraenner, John 

Kincaid, John P 

Knechtlv, Ulrich 

Kellnm, William 

Kerr, S. C 

Linn, Chas. A., Jr. 

Lokey, William 

Linn, M 

Leggett, Mrs. E. F 

Linn, Chas. A., Sr. 
Lewis, Benj. F 

Lawrence, Henry 

Loudon, Win. P 

Linn, John 

Ladenberger, L 

Liggett, W. W 

Long, D. L 

Lewis, Fred 

Marphy, M. M 

Martin, A. B 

Mnddox, W 

McCague, John 

Merrell, Stanley 

Mnddox, John 

McCormick, S A. . . . 

Misehler, August .... 

Mockbee, W. L 

Martin, Samuel 

Mefford, A. B 

MefTord, Walker 

Mennugh, G. W 

Miller, Robert S 

Mauser, Catharine . . . 

Martin, Henry 

McPherson, Iris 

McElfresh, Culeb 

Martin, Mrs. Susan . . 

Martin, Rufus 

Martin, George W. . . 

Midler, Daniel 

Norris, William 

Nardin, E. T 

Norris, B. S 

Porter, Isaac 

Parker, J. P 

Phipps, G. W 



225 
105} 
161} 
165 
142 
128 
80 
113 



42f 



hid 

12 
111 

45| 



1110 



Ripley 



Red Oak. 
Ripley ,. 



Levanna . 
Ripley. . . 



Centre Point . 
Ripley 



Levanna . 
Ripley . . 
Red Ouk 
Ripley . . 



Red Ouk. 
Ripley . . 



Levanna . 
Ripley . . 



Red Ouk 
Ripley . . 



Red Oak 
Ripley . . 



Farmers 

Farmer ....... < . 

Hotel Keeper. . , , . 

Merchant 

Boot and Shoemake 
Trader .......... 

PitinO Mnker 
Marble Cutler . . . 

Billiards 

Blacksmith 



Atlorney at Law . . . 
Cabinet mak. & Far 
Funuer 



Druggist. 
Furmer . 



Hotel Keeper. 
Fanner 



Farming 



Wine Grower 
Fanner 



Merchant . 
Farmer . . 



Minister 

Pros. Attorney . 
Harness Maker . 
Mereliunt 



Trader . . . 
Carpenter. 
Farmer . . 



Cooper 
Farmer 



Bookkeeper 

Trader and Farmer 

Druggist 

J. P. and Ins. Agt. 
Drug&Gro. Sulesm 
Furniture Dealer. . 

Farmer 

Brewer 

Manufacturer 

Farmer 



Tailor . . 
Farmer 
Wiu H Gr< 
Farmer 



Farming. 
Farmer . 



Brown Co., O.. 
Bavaria, Ger. .• , 
Brown Co., 0. . 



Germany 

Brown Co., O 

Davis Co., Ky 

Lancaster Co., Pa. , 
Montgomery Co.,Ky 

Mifflin Co., Pa 

Bataria, Ger. .- . . . 

Brown Co , O 

Passaic Co., N. J. . 
New York City 

Brown Co., O. 

Bavaria, Ger. ...... 

Brown Co., 0. 



Hesse Dnrmstadt, G. 
Brown Co., O. . . . . . 



Austria. 
Browa Co., O. . 

Germany .■ 

Rockbridge Co., Va, 
Kentucky ..... 
Brown Co., O. 



Adams Co., O. 
Fleming Co., Ky. 
Mason Co., Ky. . . 
Bavaria, Ger 



Baden, Ger..,. 
Brown Co., O.. 
Adams Co., O. 
Brown Co..O.. 



Alsaee, France 

Brown Co., O 

Switzerland w 

Brown Co,, O 

Harrison Co., O. .■ . . 

Bavaria, Ger 

Somerset Co., Md. . 

Bavaria, Ger. .• 

Mason Co., Ky 

Bavaria, Ger 

Brown Co., 0 

Dearborn Co., Hid. . 

Brown Co., 0 

Bavaria, Ger 

Strasburg, France . . 

Brown Co., 0 

Adams Co., 0. 
Fleming Co., Ky. . , 
Highland Co., O. .. 

Brown Co., 0 

Adams Co., O 

Hamilton Co., O. . 
Adams Co., 0 



Bavaria, Ger 

Clermont Co., O. . 
Brown Co.. O 



Bavaria, Ger. . 
Brown Co. 0. 



Bavaria, Ger. . . . 
Mason Co., Ky. . 



Wine Growing. 
Blacksmith 

Piano Tuner 1 Butler Co., O. 

Contractor Brown Co., 0. . 

Farmer " 

Moulder Mobile, Ala. ... 

Physician & Surgeon' Mason Co., Ky. . 



SO 



LIST OF PATRONS OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO — Concluded. 



UNION TOWNSHIP-Continued. 



Pleiffer, Max 

Pangburn, John .... 

Pfeifier, John 

Penty, Henry 

Perry, Albert 

Prickett, J. T 

Reynolds, J 

Reinert, Lewis 

Reynolds, W. P 

Reichmann, Lorenz . . 

Rossmann, P 

Roemer, Henry 

Richer, Josiah 

Riehey, Philip J. B. . . 

Riesser, Joseph 

Rnbenaker, J. P 

Rossman, Philip 

Shaw, F. F 

Slv. William H 

Scholler, Joseph 

Shaw, George W 

Shaw, Capt. O. F 

Snlton, O 

Senior, W. F 

Stonebraker, J. A. . . . 

Schilling, M. 

Stephenson, J. E 

Saepalt. Joseph 

Smith, William 

Smith, Mathew 

Stephenson, W. R 

Smith, David 

Sneder, Valentine 

Salisbury, C. L 

Smith, Samuel 

Salisbury, T. S 

Stephenson, Thomas . . 

Seipelt, Fred 

Stamm, Jacob 

Snead, Caleb 

Tomlinson, W. B 

Thompson, H 

Tweed, J. Wiley 

Thompson, Mrs. B. . . . 

Tweed, Marion 

Thompson, Thomas M. 
Tweed, Jas. Archie . . . 

Vance, Jos. K 

Vance, William S 

Vogel, Frank 

Wolff, Wniliam 

Wylie, J. L 



OCCUPATION. 



Ripley . . 

Ripley . . 
Red Oak 
Ripley . . 



II) I -i 
206i 
214 

26 

85J 
100 



Leranna . 

Ripley . . 

Leranna . 
Ripley . . 



Ripley 



Levanna , 
Ripley . . 



Cooper 

Farmer 

Boot and Shoemaker 
Farmer 



Physician 

Banker 

Baker 

Publisher 

Marble Cutter . 
Shoemaket 



Fanner Bavaria, Ger. 



Shoemaker 

Farmer 

Wine k Beer Saloon 
Justice and Notary . 
Attorney at Law. . . 

Restaurant 

Grocer 

Steamboat Clerk . . 

Farmer 

Piano Maker 

Insurance Agent . . 

Miller 

Teacher 

Gardener , 

Farmer 



Trader 
Farmer 



Farm. & Stonemason Yorkshire, Eng. , 
Farmer Brown Co., 0 . . . 



Wurtemberg, Ger. 
Brown Co., O. . . . 
Wurtemberg, Ger. . 

Adams Co., 0 

Lee Co., W. Va.. . 

Brown Co., 0 

Franklin Co., Pa. . 
Wurtemberg, Ger. . 

Brown Co., 0 

Bavaria, Ger 

Hesse Darmstadt, G. 



Brown Co., O. 

Bavaria, Ger. . . 
Baden, Ger. . . . 

Germany 

Brown Co., O. . 



Baden, Ger. . . 
Brown Co., 0.. 



London, Eng 

Belmont Co ; 0. . . 
Wurtemberg, Ger. . 
Brown Co., 0. . . . . 

Austria 

Bavaria, Ger. 



, Co., 0.. 



Mechanic 

Farmer 

Editor Ripley Bee. 

Grocer 

Miller 



Farmer 



Carpenter 
Partner . . 



Machinist 

Physician & Surgeon 



Austria 

Bavaria, Ger. . . 
Brown Co., 0.. 



Virginia 

Brown Co., 0.. . . 
Jefferson Co., 0. , 

Brown Co., O 

Mason Co., Ky. . . 
Brown Co., O. . . . 
Adams Co., 0. . . . 



Austria 

Hamilton Co., 0. 
Ballard Co., Ky. . 



18.i.3 
1819 
1853 
1869 
1861 
18(14 
1828 
185T 
1849 
1>51 
1850 
1857 
1S30 
1848 
1867 
1852 
1852 
1829 
1824 
1856 
1850 

1833 

1870 

1860 

1872 

1837 

1854 

1866 

1847 

1843 

1826 

1832 

1842 

1865 

1818 

1826 

1851 | 

1840 I 

1841 

1847 

1845 
1835 
1836 
1859 
1857 
1863 
1873 
1854 
1365 
1844 



UNION TOWNSHIP-Concluded. 



Wylie, A. N 

Wheeler, John W. . 

AVheeler, J. B 

Whisner, Alex 

Wiles, W. P 

Wiles, Joseph 

Welzel, Martin 
Williamson, J. E. . . , 
Williamson, Albert . 
Whisner, Porter S. . 
Young, William D. . 
Yeaton, Samuel 
Zaumseil, Charles, , , 



Ripley 

Lcvanns 
Ripley . 



Physician ...... , 

Barber 

Carpenter. ....... 

Former 

Butcher 

Farmer 

Attorney at Law . 

Farmer 

Jeweller 



Washington Co., Pa 
Montgomery, Ala.. . 
Lincoln Co , Me.. . . 
Brown Co., 0 



Hesse Darmstadt, G 
Fleming Co., Ky. . . 
Brown Co , 0 



Oxford Co., Me. 
Saxony, Ger. . . - 



WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP. 



Beck, Isaac M 

Bare, Huston 

Barngrover, Mrs. Calh. 

Dunn, N. S 

Dunn, Robert 

Glenn, A. H 

Hitc, J. L 

Hile, Cassius M. C. . . . 

Kincuid, P. R 

Knight, J. W 

Kennedy, J. L 

Kennedy, A. A. 
Kiesewetler, John .... 

Knight, James 

Kirk, J. W 

1. acock", Moses 

Mclntire, James 

McNeeley, Mrs. Mary A 

McFaddin, Joseph 

McFaddin, Josiah 

McClain, J. B 

Nelson, Geo. M 

Petithury, Charles 

Purely, Ellison 

Partly, John C 

Stephens, Henry 

Snider, Jacob 

Tracy, Ira 

Vance, W. W 

Wright, John 

Wardlow, Levi, Jr 

Waters, A. M 



108 
183£ 



New Hope . 
Sardinia . . . 



Arnheim . 
Sardinia . 



Physician 

Farmer 

Pr. Hot. & Stk. Deal 

Farmer 

Druggist 

Farmer 

Farmer and Teacher 
Farmer and J. P. . . 
Furniture Dealer. . . 

Clerk 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Farm, k Wagonmak 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Mill. & Dressmaker. 
Farmer 

Physician ' .' .' .' .' .' .' .' .' 
Farmer and Teacher 
Fanner 

Farmer and Teacher 
Farmer 

Farm. & Stock Deal. 
Prop. Restaurant . . 
Farmer & Co. Com. 

Farmer 

Lawyer 



1816 
1870 
1871 
1827 
1830 
1827 
1865 
1831 
1846 
1 838 

1860 
1859 



Clermont Co., O. 
Brown Co., 0. . . . 

Gallia Co., O. . . . 
Brown Co., O. . . . 

Hamilton Co., 6. 
Brown Co , 0. . . . 

Austria 

Brown Co., O 

Baltimore Co., Md 

Brown Co., O 

Philadelphia, Pa. . . 

Brown Co., O 

Augusta Co., Va. . 
Highland Co., O. , 
Clermont Co., O. , 
Highland Co., O. . 

France 

Highland Co , O. . 

Brown Co., 0 

Germany 

Pennsylvania 

New York 

Brown Co., 0 

Ohio 



182S 
1813 
1842 
1844 
1815 
1848 
1842 
1844 
1823 
1871 
1835 
1840 
1853 
1822 
1834 
1830 
1842 
1824 
1827 
1828 
1866 
1848 
1856 
1837 
1847 
1835 
1839 
1837 
1845 
1814 
1839 
1851 



80 



LIST OP PATRONS OP BROWN COUNTY, OHIO— Concluded. 



UNION TOWNSHIP-Continued. 



Pfeiffer, Max 

Pangburn, John 

Pfeiffer, John 

Penty, Henry 

Perrv, Albert 

Prickett, J. T 

Reynolds, J 

Reinert, Lewis 

Reynolds, W. P 

Reiehraann, Lorenz . . 

Rossmann, P 

Roemer, Henry 

Richey, Josiah 

Richey, Philip J. B.. . 

Riesser, Joseph 

Rubenaker, J. F 

Rossman, Philip 

Shaw, F. F 

Sly, William H 

Sebolter, Joseph 

Shaw, George W 

mktr, Capt. O. F. 

Sntton, O 

Senior, W. F 

Stonebraker, J. A 

Schilling, M 

Stephenson, J. E 

Saepalt. Joseph 

. Smith, William 

Smith, Mathew 

Stephenson, W. R 

Smith, David 

Sneder, Valentine 

Salisbury, C. L 

Smith, Samuel 

Salisbury, T. S 

Stephenson, Thomas . . 

Seipelt, Fred 

Stamm, Jacob 

Snead, Caleb 

Tomlinson, W. B 

Thompson, H 

Tweed, J. Wiley 

Thompson, Mrs. E. . . . 

Tweed, Marion 

Thompson, Thomas M, 
Tweed, Jas. Archie . . . 

Vance, Jos. K 

Vance, William S 

Vogel, Frank 

Wolff, William 

Wylie, J. L 



Ripley . . 
Levanna . 
Ripley . . 
Red Oak 
Ripley . . . 



160 
44£ 



Levanna . 

Ripley . . 

Levanna . 
Ripley . i 



Ripley 



Levanna . 
Ripley . . 



Cooper 

Farmer 

Boot and Shoemake 
Farmer 



Physician 

Banker 

Baker 

Publisher 

Marble Cutter . 

Shoemaker 

Farmer 



Shoemaker 

Farmer 

Wine &■ Beer Salooi 
Justice and Notary 
Attorney at Law. . 

Restaurant 

Grocer 

Steamboat Clerk . . 

Farmer 

Piano Maker 

Insurance Agent . . 

Miller 

Teacher 

Gardener 

Farmer 



Trader 
Farmer 



Farm. & Stonemason 
Farmer 



Mechanic 

Farmer 

Editor Ripley Bee. 

Grocer 

Miller 



Farmer 



Carpenter 
Fanner . . 



Machinist 

Physician & Surgeon 



Wurtemberg, Ger. 
Brown Co., O. ... 
Wurtemberg, Ger. . 

Adams Co., 0 

Lee Co., W. Va. . . 

Brown Co., 0 

Franklin Co., Fa. . 
Wurtemberg, Ger. . 

Brown Co., O 

Bavaria, Ger 

Hesse Darmstadt, G 

Bavaria, Ger 

Brown Co.. 0 



Bavaria, Ger. . 
Baden, Ger. . . 

Germany 

Brown Co., 0. . 



Baden, Ger. .. 
Brown Co., 0. 



London, Eng 

Belmont Co . O. . . 
Wurtemberg, Ger. . 

Brown Co.,0 

Austria 

Bavaria, Ger 



Srown Co., 0. . 



Yorkshire, Eng. 
Brown Co., 0 . . 

Austria 

Bavaria, Ger. . . . 
Brown Co., 0.. . 

Virginia 

Brown Co., O. . . 
Jefferson Co., O. 
Brown Co., O,. . 
Masou Co., Ky. . 
Brown Co., 0. . . 
Adams Co., 0. . . 

Austria 

Hamilton Co., O 
Ballard Co., Ky. 



1 S.i.S 
1819 
1853 
1869 
1861 
1804 
1828 
1857 
1849 
1854 
1850 
1857 
1830 
1848 
1867 
1852 
1852 
1829 
1824 
1856 
1850 

1833 
1870 
1860 
1872 
1837 
1854 
1866 
1847 
1843 
182G 
1832 
1842 
1865 
181S 
1826 
1854 
1840 
1841 
1847 

1845 1 

1835 

1836 

1859 1 

1857 ■ 

1863 , 

1873 

1854 

1865 

1844 



UNION TOWNSHIP-Concluded. 



No. of p o ADD R E ss. OCCUPATON 



Wylie, A. N 

Wheeler, John W. . 

Wheeler, J. B 

Whisner, Alex 

Wiles, W. P 

Wiles, Joseph 

Wetzel, Martin . . . 
Williamson, J. E. . . 
Williamson, Albert 
Whisner, Porter S. 
Young, William D. 
Yeaton, Samuel . * > 
Zaumseil, Charles, . 



Ripley 

Levam 
Ripley 



Physician 

Barber 

Carpenter. ....... 

Farmer 

Butcher 

Farmer 

Attorney at Law . 
Farmer ........ 

Jeweller 



Washington Co., Pa 
Montgomery, Ala.. . 

Lincoln Co , Me 

Brown Co., O 



Hesse Darmstadt, G 
Fleming Co., Ky. . . 
Brown Co , 0 



Oxford Co., Me. 
Saxony, Ger. . . . 



WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP. 



Beck, Isaac M 

Bare, Huston 

Barngrover, Mrs. Cath. 

Dunn, N. S 

Dunn, Robert 

Glenn, A. H 

Hite, J. L 

Hile, Cassius M. C 

Kineaid, P. R 

Knight, J. W 

Kennedy, J. L 

Kennedy, A. A. , .... . 

Kiesewetter, John 

Knight, James 

Kirk, J. W 

Lacoeft, Moses 

Melntire, James 

MeNeeley, Mrs. Mary A 

MeFiiddin, Joseph 

MeFoddin, Josiah 

McClain, J. B 

Nelson, Geo. M 

Petithory, Charles 

Purdy, Ellison 

Purdy, John C 

Stephens, Henry 

Snider, Jacob 

Tracy, Ira 

Vance, W. W 

Wright, John 

Wardlow, Levi, J r 

Waters, A. M 



358 
29 
6& 
15l| 

72i 
72! 
56" 



108 
183* 



New Hope . 
Sardinia . . . 



Arnheim . 
Sardinia . 



Physician 

Farmer 

Pr.Hot.&Stk. Deal 

Farmer 

Druggist 

Farmer 

Farmer and Teacher 
Farmer and J. P. . . 
Furniture Dealer. . . 

Clerk 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Farm. & Wagonniak. 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Mill. & Dressmaker. 
Farmer 

Physician 

Farmer and Teacher 
Farmer 

Farmer and Teacher 
Farmer 

Farm. & Stock Deal. 
Prop. Restaurant . . 
Farmer & Co. Com. 

Farmer 

Lawyer 



Clermont Co., 0. 
Brown Co., O. . . - 



Gallia Co., 0. . 
Brown Co., O. , 



Hamilton Co., O. 
Brown Co . O. . . . 



Austria 

Brown Co., O 

Baltimore Co., Md 

Brown Co., 0 

Philadelphia, Po. . . 

Brown Co., O 

Augusta Co., Va. . 
Highland Co., O. . 
Clermont Co., O. , 
Highland Co., O. . 

France 

Highland Co , O. . 

Brown Co., 0 

Germany 

Pennsylvania 

New York 

Brown Co., 0 

Ohio 



V 



ft 



rf 



IS 



% 



■u 



0) 



3? 



If 



37 




if 



n 



4 Id 



If 



It 



(LU 



1 



1 



Mm